Tag Archives: Wanrow

Round Up of items from the Web: Wanrow, Clothes, and a dean search…

To begin,a talk from Donna Coker (UMiami Law).  She’s talking about the Wanrow case, not one I have studied before, but truly fascinating (link is to Wikipedia, not the judgment, which is here).  Here’s part of what she says at Feminist Law Professors about the talk:

The “story” describes a fascinating account of both feminist and Native American activism on fair trial rights for women.

Sold! She talks about the case, the lawyers, the defendant – it’s a chapter in the upcoming “Criminal Law Stories”, of which Coker is a co-editor.  Canadian women’s law stories, anyone?  Imagine it. Glorious.

My ongoing obsession (furthered by slutwalk discussions) about how feminists can grab attention for public projects without using sexist/racist tropes appreciated this discussion over at sociological images of this poster from a German human rights group.

In where fashion meets inclusion and activism, two little things – not slutwalk! First, also from WISI, Resport – a sports hijab.  You may recall news reports about girls banned from various sports because of the hijab or niqab – this sleek design is intended to solve any safety issues and account for religious belief.  Second, I have been really enjoying hearing the CBC radio reporting on Izzy Camillieri’s new Toronto boutique which sells clothes for a “seated clientele” – in other words, women who use wheelchairs.  It got me thinking about “what is activism” and “how to make a difference” – the testimonials from women who checked out the clothes all were clear about what a difference the availability of adaptable, professional and relatively affordable clothes would mean to them – and it was a big, big deal.   And the clothes are pretty amazing too. Here’s IZ Adaptive Clothing’s “Press” page., Having the “right” things to wear – to accommodate belief, rules, comfort, professional roles – these things really matter in terms of being and feeling welcome in a particular space.  Sometimes activism requires insisting that the context change and accept different modes of dress. Sometimes, though, that approach might miss a more obvious and meaningful improvement….

Finally,this post from Brian Leiter describes a scene from Wisconsin’s Dean search – and raises the question – what is the blogger’s responsibility for what goes on in comments? Widely read blogger Ann Althouse, who is a prof at Wisconsin, profiled the candidates and then asked

for “comments” from her readers, who then proceed to trash and insult the candidates for Dean of her school!  Wow!

The “trashing” was a lovely stew of racism and homophobia, as I understand it.  I haven’t seen it – the post is still up – but shows 0 comments.