Tag Archives: UK

via Jotwell: Womb as Wedge: What We Can Learn from Revisiting the Political History of the Abortion Controversy in the US

Here’s my post on Jotwell Equality.

[What? You don’t read Jotwell: The Journal of things we like (lots)?]

Womb as Wedge: What We Can Learn from Revisiting the Political History of the Abortion Controversy in the US – Jotwell: Equality.

Linda Greenhouse and Reva Siegel, Before (and After) Roe v. Wade: New Questions about Backlash, 120 Yale L.J. 2028 (2011), available at SSRN.

Sitting in Toronto or maybe Bristol, we have a tendency to watch American politics with both fear and amusement, rather like (or so I hear) some people watch Jersey Shore or Keeping up with the Kardashians: Who are these people? Why do they behave this way?

This is delightfully, smugly, self-satisfying. It is neither analytic nor strategic. And when, inevitably it seems, our relatively open access to abortion (as Carol Sanger has called it, the “luxury of legality”) starts to be challenged, it might leave us rather less than prepared. Greenhouse and Siegel’s article illustrates how a slow burn, not the blast of Roe v. Wade, led to the bitter struggle over reproductive rights in the U.S. today.

continue reading here.

With thanks to my colleague Ben Berger for pushing the article on me, and CUNY’s Ruthann Robson for promo’ing the piece on Constitutional Law Prof Blog.

Sr. UK judge: Women should be given priority for top law jobs

Women should be given priority for top law jobs, says one of Britain’s most senior judges | Mail Online.

 

Master of the Rolls Lord Neuberger wants to use new legislation to favour female and minority candidates over white men if they are equally qualified for a role.

But the view is likely to be seen by critics as supporting illegal positive discrimination.

Meanwhile, here in Canada, we’re wigless, but more importantly, numbers of federal appointments of women are plummeting.  The Globe had a nice article, here and a  lovely infographic here,.

“If anything there is a larger pool of brilliant and exceptionally qualified women lawyers to draw upon since 2005,” Prof. Sheehy said. “If the current process of selection cannot deliver anything approaching a representative bench … then it is clear that something is broken.”

I’ve written about representation on the bench, (Reflections: On Judicial Diversity and Judicial Independence in this book) and I think it’s pretty clear that we have serious problems with judicial appointments which reflect the forms of discrimination which pervade our society.  The news that things are getting worse comes on top of the fact that things were not that great to begin with.

H/t IFLS member and Osgoode colleague Sara Slinn