Tag Archives: teaching

Reposting re: The emotional labour of teaching [some new links]

I posted on this “emotional labour” piece last week – it made me ask around about an article i recalled which looked at the distribution of service work in the academy (including this kind of “emotional labour”).  Liz Sheehy (Ottawa) sent me the cite.  It is:

Levit, Nancy, Keeping Feminism in Its Place: Sex Segregation and the Domestication of Female Academics. Kansas Law Review, Vol. 49, p. 775, 2001 (link is open source).  The article does has lots of more general discussion of gendered divisions in law school – both empirical and otherwise.

A deeper, more invisible pattern is occurring in the work of law schools across the country. Women law professors are becoming domesticated—and I mean that in several senses. First, female law professors are performing a disproportionate share of domestic chores within the law school relative to their numbers on faculties. Second, some feminists who espouse more radical or provocative theories suffer a different kind of domestication: a taming of the individuals through promotion and tenure processes and castigations in print of their more radical theorizing. Third, a number of traditional theorists have accused some feminists and other critical scholars of attacking reason because they urge acceptance of atypical points of view. These separate threads—concerning the roles of female academics, the career jeopardy for particularly radical feminists, and the assault on feminist theory as work lacking in reason—unite to keep feminism in its place.

ORIGINAL POST

H/T to Deb Parkes for sending me Janni Aragon’s (UVic polisci) Guardian blog post on the emotional labour of teaching.  Summer’s a better time to confront some of these questions, no?  There are both fewer students, and some particularly difficult post-marks meetings with students.

In my time as an academic, I’ve accompanied students to the police department to report a sexual assault and listened to others talk about the old memories triggered by a reading or a discussion. This is part of the emotional labour of the job. Granted, for some students, it’s not issues of violence but rather issues related to coming out, finances, a bad break up, eating disorders, and many more. My degrees are not in mental health, so I know that it’s best if I listen and then make a referral. But here’s the thing: I never attended a professional development seminar about students and mental health until I was more than 10 years into my career. I am not qualified to help the students with the array of issues that they might have.

via We should be paying more attention to the emotional labour of teaching | Higher Education Network | Guardian Professional.

 

See also:

Emotional Labor in Academia: The Case of Professors by Marcia L. Bellas The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science January 1999 vol. 561 no. 1 96-110 

abstract:  Most professors divide their time between teaching, research, service, and, for some, administration. As in the nonacademic labor market, there is a gendered reward structure in academia. Teaching and service are most closely aligned with characteristics and behaviors culturally defined as feminine, and, in the aggregate, women spend more time in these activities than men. Teaching and service clearly involve substantial amounts of emotional labor, but this labor is generally not seen as involving valued skills and is conse quently poorly rewarded. In contrast, research and administration are associated with traits culturally defined as masculine, and, on average, men spend more time in these activities. Although research and administration also involve emotional labor, their emotional aspects are largely ignored, while intellectual, technical, or leadership skills are emphasized and highly compensated. Aside from differences in the propensity of women and men to engage in different activities and the gendered reward structure associated with these activities, even when the tasks are the same, the type and intensity of emotional labor required of the sexes may differ.

We should be paying more attention to the emotional labour of teaching | Higher Education Network | Guardian Professional

H/T to Deb Parkes for sending me Janni Aragon’s (UVic polisci) Guardian blog post on the emotional labour of teaching.  Summer’s a better time to confront some of these questions, no?  There are both fewer students, and some particularly difficult post-marks meetings with students.

In my time as an academic, I’ve accompanied students to the police department to report a sexual assault and listened to others talk about the old memories triggered by a reading or a discussion. This is part of the emotional labour of the job. Granted, for some students, it’s not issues of violence but rather issues related to coming out, finances, a bad break up, eating disorders, and many more. My degrees are not in mental health, so I know that it’s best if I listen and then make a referral. But here’s the thing: I never attended a professional development seminar about students and mental health until I was more than 10 years into my career. I am not qualified to help the students with the array of issues that they might have.

via We should be paying more attention to the emotional labour of teaching | Higher Education Network | Guardian Professional.

 

See also:

Emotional Labor in Academia: The Case of Professors by Marcia L. Bellas The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science January 1999 vol. 561 no. 1 96-110 

abstract:  Most professors divide their time between teaching, research, service, and, for some, administration. As in the nonacademic labor market, there is a gendered reward structure in academia. Teaching and service are most closely aligned with characteristics and behaviors culturally defined as feminine, and, in the aggregate, women spend more time in these activities than men. Teaching and service clearly involve substantial amounts of emotional labor, but this labor is generally not seen as involving valued skills and is conse quently poorly rewarded. In contrast, research and administration are associated with traits culturally defined as masculine, and, on average, men spend more time in these activities. Although research and administration also involve emotional labor, their emotional aspects are largely ignored, while intellectual, technical, or leadership skills are emphasized and highly compensated. Aside from differences in the propensity of women and men to engage in different activities and the gendered reward structure associated with these activities, even when the tasks are the same, the type and intensity of emotional labor required of the sexes may differ.

Canadian Feminist/Legal Scholars on Case Method & Context

These two pieces from West Coast colleagues caught my eye lately. Both are about putting the context back into cases and they offer much to us as educators and scholars.

Young, Margot E., Insite: Site and Sight (Part 1 – Insights on Insite) (2011). Constitutional Forum, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 87-91, 2011.

The case thus presents a legal moment in a much longer and more complex social and political struggle over the rights and life chances of groups significantly marginalized and disadvantaged in Canadian society generally, and in the urban life of the city at issue in particular.

Elizabeth A. Adjin-Tettey and Freya Kodar  offer up  Film as a Complement to the Written Text: Reflections on Using the Sterilization of Leilani Muir to Teach Muir v. Alberta (2011). Alberta Law Review, Vol. 48, No. 3, 2011.  This one grabbed me at least in part because of Regina Austin’s recent visit and our discussions about the place of documentary film and video making as a part of teaching lawyers.  Adjin-Tettey and Kodar are thoughtful on the opportunities and questions – definitely worth a read for those thinking about tweaking their teaching.

The increasing use of film, fictional and documentary, to tell stories about law is partly influenced by the perception that moving images and sound recordings of real life events
offer the audience entry points into the lives of those involved in the case, along with a picture of the broader contexts that may be omitted in case reports. In this regard films,
particularly documentaries, take viewers beyond the “official” accounts in the case reports and allow them to experience the “reality” of the cases.47 Visual images, as well as sound
recordings of events, provide audiences a rare opportunity to reflect on, interpret images and sounds, and form their own impression and understanding of events. The opportunity to
observe body language, facial expression, and demeanour, as well as any subtext that might not be immediately apparent in a written record, produces an affective and embodied
response not always possible from engagement with written texts. It allows the viewer a better sense of the meaning of the case to those involved.

 

Online teaching roundtables – a model from The Conglomerate blog

At Conglomerate blog, they are running some online roundtables on teaching business courses. Neat model! Takers? Any we could run here? We could think about “teaching gender/equality/law” or we could talk about getting equality/gender content into one/more of the first year courses….

Click here to see an example from the Conglomerate.

New in Print: Women, Law, and Equality: A Discussion Guide

The editors are well known Canadian scholars (former LEAF litigator Prof. Carissima Mathen and new Dalhousie Dean Kim Brooks).  The other contributors are the soon to be at Ottawa U Suzanne Bouclin and Carleton U’s Doris Buss.

Equally interesting is the intended audience for the book: “ideal for a survey or introductory-level gender studies, women in the law, or women-focused political science course. It could also be used for a series of book club-style discussions,” according to Irwin Law’s promotional blurb.  Book club, anyone?

Women, Law, and Equality: A Discussion Guide (clickable link takes you to the Irwin Law site to order).

Kim Brooks and Carissima Mathen, eds.

[from the Irwin law site]

  • …designed to stimulate and facilitate discussions around the complicated issues of feminism, equality, and social justice among broad spectrum of readers, with varied perspectives and knowledge.
  • Each chapter provides excerpted and compiled texts and discussion questions intended to stimulate discussion.
  • The range of topics covered in the guide make it ideal for a survey or introductory-level gender studies, women in the law, or women-focused political science course. It could also be used for a series of book club-style discussions.

Summary Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Let’s Talk Women, Law, and Equality

Glossary

Chapter 1: Polygamy

Kim Brooks

Chapter 2: Caring for Young Children

Kim Brooks

Chapter 3: Feminism, Law, Cinema

Suzanne Bouclin

Chapter 4: Women and Power (or, Powerful Women)

Carissima Mathen

Chapter 5: Women and Migration

Doris Buss

Chapter 6:  Final Thoughts