Tag Archives: NNEWH

NNEWH: women working in particular occupations have an increased risk of developing breast cancer

Plastics workers in the auto industry (Windsor, Ont) were part of the study.“This research supports a growing understanding that when it comes to endocrine disrupting chemicals, even low doses can be dangerous” stated Dayna Nadine Scott, [Osgoode colleague and ] Director of NNEWH. “We are exposed to these chemicals at home, in the workplace and in the environment – it’s time to demand a regulatory response that is integrated and health-protective for everyone.”

via The National Network on Environments and Women’s Health

 

As we  noted earlier this year, NNEWH has had all it’s funding cut by the federal government.

Government Cuts continue: Women's Health Contribution program cut, interdisciplinary research loses.

Received this from my wonderful colleague Dayna Scott, director of the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health:

I regret to inform you that the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health, a research center that has been housed at York for the past decade, learned last week that our funding will end March 31, 2013.

The Network was part of the Women’s Health Contribution Program (WHCP), though which Health Canada had funded innovative interdisciplinary health research, built community partnerships and provided important mentorship opportunities for students in women’s health. The program was eliminated by Health Canada in the fallout from the federal budget 2012.

“The effect of this decision by Health Canada is yet another strong sign that the federal government is pulling away from its responsibility to gender equality. The work funded through the WHCP has been crucial to ensuring that Canadian women have had access to the best evidence and policy advice on women’s health issues, through research that recognized that social and environmental determinants of health are key“ said Chi Nguyen, Chair of the Board of the Canadian Women’s Health Network (another organization affected by the cuts to the WHCP).

In recent years at NNEWH we have conducted research on the governance of toxics, with specific attention to the way that sex and gender considerations are incorporated into decision making in the management of the risks from everyday chemical exposures.

We add our voices to the growing body of Canadians who are shocked and outraged by the short-sightedness of the federal government cuts to programs, services and the federal civil service, particularly in the areas of Aboriginal women’s health and the environment. These cuts are in direct contradiction to the pledges regarding gender equality that Canada has made both in international commitments and to Canadians. Women are being hit particularly hard with these cuts, and, because the research being eliminated generated proactive, preventative strategies for health promotion, these cuts will cost everyone in the long term. The end of this work will be most strongly felt by the disadvantaged and the disempowered.

Breast Cancer & Toxics: Do labelling campaigns burden women?

Delighted to have this “Guest Post” from Osgoode colleague and IFLS member  Dayna N. Scott who is the Exec Dir of the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health.  You can find some of her research here, on SSRN.

Léa Pool’s documentary about the breast cancer industry, Pink Ribbons Inc (clip below), premiered at the Toronto International Film Fest last month. Cancer has touched all of us, and it has probably inspired in all of us an urge to “do something”, too, but this film challenges us to think a lot more about what kinds of things we should do if we really want to stop this disease.  Pool’s film was inspired by Samantha King’s book Pink Ribbons, Inc.: Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy.

Breast Cancer Action Montreal (BCAM) is an organization that really is working towards preventing breast cancer.  They recently launched a campaign, in this spirit, asking for a recognizable symbol or label to be placed on all consumer products in Canada that contain carcinogens.   But doesn’t a labelling campaign (see Femme Toxic‘)  just shift the onus (and the risk!) onto individual consumers – mainly women – who will vary dramatically in their capacities to make use of that label?  We at the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health argue that this “precautionary consumption” is undeniably women’s work.

Read my exchange with Patricia Kearns of BCAM here.

logo for action group Femme ToxicDayna Scott.

2008 Critical Perspectives on Environment and Women’s Health Workshop Co sponsored by IFLS and National Network on Environments and Women's Health

Supported by the National Network on Environment and Women’s Health (NNEWH), a Center of Excellence located at York University, this interdisciplinary workshop sought to engage with contemporary ideas around environmental health and justice.

“As feminists, activists and scholars we are committed to a social determinants of health model, which allows for an analysis of the complex ways in which environments produce and reproduce the conditions that create disparities in health. We are interested in exploring and deconstructing conceptions of nature, motherhood, ecologies and health as articulated within mainstream environmental discourses.

“We are seeking to overcome the tendency towards fragmentation of social movements, and to foster environmental justice organizing that takes account of gender, sexuality, race, citizenship and dis/ability in a way that is inclusive and that meaningfully accounts for difference.

Participant List

ANNE BLOOM Associate Professor of Law at the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law

PASCALE FOURNIER Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa and an associate at the university’s Human Rights Research and Education Centre (HRREC)

LOCHLANN JAIN

Assistant Professor of Cultural and Social Anthropology at Stanford University.

ARYN MARTIN Assistant Professor at the Department of Sociology and Program in Science & Technology Studies at York University.

STU MARVEL (Osgoode PhD candidate)

ROXANNE MYKITIUK Associate Professor of Law at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

DAYNA NADINE SCOTT Assistant Professor Osgoode Hall, cross-appointed with the Faculty of Environmental Studies

RACHEL STEIN professor of English and director of Women’s and Multicultural Studies at Siena College in New York.

NOËL STURGEON Chair and Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Graduate Faculty in American Studies at Washington State University

CHERYL TEELUCKSINGH Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology at Ryerson University

This workshop inspired an article recently published by Prof. Dayna Scott (Osgoode) a co director of the NNEWH

Gender Benders: Sex and Law in the constitution of polluted bodies.  Feminist Legal Studies (2009) 17: 241

Springerlink to article (requires authorized access)