Tag Archives: law

New in Print from UBC Press: Calder & Beaman, Polygamy's Rights and Wrongs

 

Click here for UBC press page

Gillian Calder (UVic) and Lori G. Beaman (UOttawa) Eds.

Polygamy’s Rights & Wrongs: Perspectives of Harm, Family, and Law 

Contents look really interesting – with a strong theme connecting them but quite diverse.    They are described in Lori Beaman’s introduction, “Is Polygamy Inherently Harmful?”, which, happily, you can read as a sample, here.  I hope your librarian is getting this (they may appreciate an email suggesting it).  Great cover design too!

 

1 Plus Ça Change … ? Bountiful’s Diverse and Durable Marriage Practices / Angela Campbell 

2 How Should Public Institutions Assess Religious Identity? The Case of Polygamy / Avigail Eisenberg 

3 Polygamy and the Predicament of Contemporary Criminal Law / Benjamin L. Berger 

4 Are They Not Us? A Personal Reflection on Polygamy / Arta Blanche Johnson 

5 Reflecting on Polygamy: What’s the Harm? / Rebecca Johnson 

6 Polygamy in the Parisian Banlieues: Debate and Discourse on the 2005 French Suburban Riots / Jennifer A. Selby 

7 Polygamy and Race-Thinking: A Genealogy / Margaret Denike 

8 Making Them Fit: The Australian National Census and Aboriginal Family Forms / Frances Morphy 

9 The Raids at Short Creek and Yearning for Zion Ranch and the Law of Unintended Consequences / Martha Bradley-Evans 

Conclusion: “To the Exclusion of All Others” — Polygamy, Monogamy, and the Legal Family in Canada / Gillian Calder 

art break: Indian Act by Nadia Myre

two pieces from the larger work

My colleague Kate Sutherland (@lawandlit) sent me a link to this fascinating and beautiful artwork.  Resonates on so many levels – raising questions about textual meaning, and the way laws come to be and many more….   Have a look.  I wonder where this work is now.

some great pictures of Indian Act by Nadia Myre can be seen online at: The Medicine Project.

Lawrence reviews Sara Ahmed's On Being Included on Jotwell

I reviewed Sara Ahmed’s On Being Included on Jotwell, here: bit.ly/1cdXfyg

After reading Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia1 and attending the Symposium organized around the book by the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law and Justice, I came home to find Sara Ahmed’s On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life waiting in my mailbox (this Jot is about On Being Included, although I’m quite prepared to say that I like Presumed Incompetent (lots) as well). The combination of these two books, both filled with personal stories and institutional insight, cracked my vision of my own place in the legal academy, and the “practice” of diversity, wide open. I read this work as a person who shares a (not surprising, really) number of experiences-as-academic with Ahmed. I read it just after reading the often deeply personal essays in Presumed Incompetent. I also read it as a person who has worked to avoid being noticed as “the problem” while trying to maintain a commitment to anti-racist work. These days, that means deep concern that my own strategies and efforts are nothing more than thinly veneered cooptation. All of these things, I think, amplified the impact of the book on me. But I still do not hesitate to recommend it to you, Jotwell reader

Go and read the full review, if you have a few minutes.

If you aren’t following Jotwell: Equality (and the other sections too), maybe consider it? A good way to have other people curate some of the flood of publications.  Also, that picture of me on jotwell – more than 10 years old, so, yes. Especially in light of the fact that I can update social media 10x a day, I can probably manage a new photo.

Welcome to summer, if you’re in my hemisphere.

Professor Ngaire Naffine (Adelaide): "The Legal Person after the Sexual Revolution: Criminal Law, the Church and the Family"

The legal person after the sexual revolution

Professor Ngaire Naffine (Adelaide) delivered this LRST/IFLS lecture as a Genest Visitor to Osgoode Hall Law School on September 24th, 2012. Find out more about Professor Naffine via IFLS posts – here.

Columbia Law's GCSL Now Accepting Applications for Sabbatical Visitors!

Deadline April 15.  Tell your friend to apply if you don’t think it’s your year. What a great opportunity.

The Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School invites applications for Sabbatical Visitors for the 2013-2014 academic year to undertake research, writing and collaboration with Center faculty and students in ways that span traditional academic disciplines. The CGSL welcomes applications from faculty from any field who are interested in spending a semester or the academic year in residence at Columbia Law School working on scholarly projects relating to Gender and/or Sexuality Law.

Sabbatical visitors will receive an office with phone and computer, secretarial support and full access to university libraries, computer systems and recreational facilities. In addition, Sabbatical Visitors will be expected to participate in CGSL activities and present a paper at the Center’s Colloquium Series.

more here: Gender & Sexuality Law Blog » Blog Archive » Now Accepting Applications for Sabbatical Visitors!.