Tag Archives: Human Rights

CANCELLED: Dean Penny Andrews at Osgoode on New Strategies for Pursuing Women's Human Rights

Feb3PAPosterCANCELLED

Please note that flight cancellations have led to this talk being cancelled.  With apologies to all who were hoping to attend today.

 

 

Dean Penelope Andrews (Albany) will be at Osgoode Monday February 3, 2014,  and will speak from her latest book, From Capetown to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights (Ashgate) 1230-230 in room 2027.  Please RSVP to Lielle Gonsalves, lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

The author examines and compares gender inequality in societies undergoing political, economic and legal transformation, and looks at two countries – South Africa and Afghanistan – in particular. These two societies serve as counterpoints through which the book engages, in a nuanced and novel way, with the many broader issues that flow from the attempts in newly democratic societies to give effect to the promise of gender equality. Developing the idea of ‘conditional interdependence’, the book suggests a new approach based on the communitarian values which underpin newly democratic societies and would allow women’s rights to gain momentum and reap greater benefits. [from the publisher]

Ruthann Robson reviewed the book for Jotwell, here.

More about Dean Andrews from the Albany website, here:

Dean Andrews, who was born and raised in South Africa, has extensive international experience, including teaching at law schools in Germany, Australia, Holland, Scotland, Canada and South Africa. An annual award in her name—The Penelope E. Andrews Human Rights Award—was inaugurated in 2005 at the South African law school of University of KwaZulu-Natal. Along with numerous other awards, she holds a “Women of South Africa Achievement Award,” as well as Albany Law’s Kate Stoneman Award, which she received in 2002.

In 2005 she was a finalist for a vacancy on the Constitutional Court of South Africa, the highest court in South Africa on constitutional matters. She has consulted for the United Nations Development Fund for Women, and for the Ford Foundation in Johannesburg, where she evaluated labor law programs. She earned her B.A. and LL.B from the University of Natal, Durban, South Africa, and her LL.M from Columbia University School of Law, New York.

She has published extensively on topics centered on gender and racial equality, South African legal issues, Australian legal issues, and international justice.

Dean Andrews will also be speaking to Professor Dayna Scott’s International Environmental Law class on Monday afternoon on the right to water in South African (constitutional) law.

 

Dean Penny Andrews at Osgoode: on New Strategies for Pursuing Women's Human Rights

Feb3PAPosterDean Penelope Andrews (Albany) will be at Osgoode Monday February 3, 2014,  and will speak from her latest book, From Capetown to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights (Ashgate) 1230-230 in room 2027.  Please RSVP to Lielle Gonsalves, lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

The author examines and compares gender inequality in societies undergoing political, economic and legal transformation, and looks at two countries – South Africa and Afghanistan – in particular. These two societies serve as counterpoints through which the book engages, in a nuanced and novel way, with the many broader issues that flow from the attempts in newly democratic societies to give effect to the promise of gender equality. Developing the idea of ‘conditional interdependence’, the book suggests a new approach based on the communitarian values which underpin newly democratic societies and would allow women’s rights to gain momentum and reap greater benefits. [from the publisher]

Ruthann Robson reviewed the book for Jotwell, here.

More about Dean Andrews from the Albany website, here:

Dean Andrews, who was born and raised in South Africa, has extensive international experience, including teaching at law schools in Germany, Australia, Holland, Scotland, Canada and South Africa. An annual award in her name—The Penelope E. Andrews Human Rights Award—was inaugurated in 2005 at the South African law school of University of KwaZulu-Natal. Along with numerous other awards, she holds a “Women of South Africa Achievement Award,” as well as Albany Law’s Kate Stoneman Award, which she received in 2002.

In 2005 she was a finalist for a vacancy on the Constitutional Court of South Africa, the highest court in South Africa on constitutional matters. She has consulted for the United Nations Development Fund for Women, and for the Ford Foundation in Johannesburg, where she evaluated labor law programs. She earned her B.A. and LL.B from the University of Natal, Durban, South Africa, and her LL.M from Columbia University School of Law, New York.

She has published extensively on topics centered on gender and racial equality, South African legal issues, Australian legal issues, and international justice.

Dean Andrews will also be speaking to Professor Dayna Scott’s International Environmental Law class on Monday afternoon on the right to water in South African (constitutional) law.

 

NIP: Muslim Women and Shari'ah Councils: Transcending the Boundaries of Community and Law, Samia Bano

New in Print from Palgrave McMillan

Muslim Women and Shari’ah Councils: Transcending the Boundaries of Community and Law Samia Bano

H/T Brenna Bhandar.

From the publisher’s flyer:

About the Author
SAMIA BANO lectures in Family law, Gender and Law and Research Methods in Law at the University of Reading Law school, UK, where she was recently been appointed Deputy Director of Research. Samia is recognized as an international scholar in the field of Muslim family law, multiculturalism and gender discrimination. Before joining the law school at Reading Samia worked as a researcher on a number of projects in the area of legal policy and practice and gender equality. November 2012 Hardback £60.00 £30.00* 9780230221482
Available as ebook  Click here for Flyer offering 50% off.
Drawing upon original empirical data and critiquing existing research material this book challenges the language of community rights and claims for legal autonomy in matters of family law. It draws upon critiques of power, dialogue and positionality to explore how multiples spaces in law and community both empower and restrict women at different times and in different contexts. It also opens up the conceptual space in which we can see in evidence the multiple legal and social realities in operation, within the larger context of state law, liberal multiculturalism and the human rights discourse. In this way the book provides an important contribution to current debate on the use of privatized and ADR mechanisms in family law matters while analyzing the dynamics of relationality and cultural diversity in new forms of mediation practices. In a wider context it explores the conceptual challenges that the rise of a faith-based dispute resolution process poses to secular/liberal notions of law, human rights and gender equality.

Table of Contents:
PART I: CONTEXT AND BACKGROUND
Multiculturalism and Secularism in the British Context
South Asian Muslims and State Law Relations
Background to the Study
PART II: SHARI’AH COUNCILS AND WOMEN’S EXPERIENCES OF MUSLIM DIVORCE
Shari’ah Councils in Britain
Shari’ah Councils and the Practice of Law-making
Personal Experiences of Marriage
Muslim Women, Divorce and Shari’ah Councils
Shari’ah Councils and Civil law
Conclusion: Justice in the ‘Shadow of Law’?

160 Girls Fundraiser October 25 at Fasken Martineau, Toronto

The “160 Girls” project is a legal initiative that aims to achieve justice and protect against rape for all girls in Kenya. The 160 Girls project will initiate litigation to secure legal remedies ordering the state to enforce existing laws in Kenya to protect girls from sexual violence and to hold rapists accountable.

The project will mobilize the law to secure concrete change for women and girls who currently experience some of the most appalling forms of violence in the world today.

More information on the 160 Girls Project here.

Information on the October 25 event here, including agenda, location, and RSVP email information.

This evening will also include an address by Dr. Elizabeth Archampong, Vice-Dean of Law at Kwame Nkrumah University, Ghana, [and former Osgoode student!] and a video launch of a mini-documentary on the 160 Girls, created by award-winning filmmaker Andrea Dorfman.

More information about the Equality Effect charitable organization, which uses human rights law to improve the lives of women and girl and has many Osgoode connections, at their website here and a previous IFLS blog post here.