Tag Archives: equality

Feb 28-March 1 in Kingston: Feminist Legal Studies Queen's presents Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law & Justice in Development and Equality

This picture of a woman's hand holding an ulu is taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 - the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives CanadaArctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality: In celebration of Dr. Patricia A. Monture

Click here for FLSQ queens page for this workshop

via Prof. Kathy Lahey (Kingston) with a reminder that students will have free registration, daytime meals, and a break on the dinner price as well.

Jan. 31, 2014 draft

FLSQ Program: Arctic/Northern Women

Friday, Feb. 28, 2014
11:30 Registration – Robert Sutherland Hall, Policy Studies room 202 – light lunch

12:30 Welcome and introduction to conference themes

Janice Hill, Four Directions Student Centre, Queen’s University
[Elder]

Åsa Gunnarsson, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå
University, Sweden

1:00 Keynote address: Eva-Maria Svensson, Gothenburg and Tromso
Universities, Principal’s Development Fund International Visitor –
‘Approaches to Gender Equality in Regional Governance of the Arctic Region’

2:20 Break

2:35 Panel I Governance and Voice: Indigenous Peoples, Women,
Climate, and Corporations

Tahnee Prior, Global Governance Program, Balsillie School of International
Affairs, University of Waterloo — ‘The Rights and Role of Indigenous Women
in Climate Change Regulation’

Vrinda Narain, Faculty of Law and Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and
Feminist Studies, McGill University – ‘Postcolonial Constitutionalism:
Complexities and Contradictions’

Kathleen Lahey, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University – ‘Gender, Indigenous
Peoples, and the Paradox of Plenty in Resource Rich Regions’

4:00 Panel II Appropriations and Dependencies: Women and Earnings,
Livelihoods, Knowledges, and Aging in Arctic Regions

Elena Kotyrlo, Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, Sweden – ‘Earnings
and Labor Force Participation of Native and Immigrant Women in
Vasterbotten and Norrbotten’

Shahnaj Begum, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland – ‘Livelihood
Transformation in the Arctic: Effects on Older People from a Gender-based
Perspective with a Special Focus on Finnish Lapland’
Lena Wennberg, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå
University – ‘Women and Aging in the Arctic Region’

Bita Amani, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario –
‘Restitution, Repatriation, and Resistance: Reframing the Biopiracy Dialogue
toward Women’s Work and Traditional Indigenous Knowledge’

5:30 Cash bar
6:00 Dinner

7:30 Celebrating Patricia Monture – Her Legacy in Activism and Learning

Kim Pate, Canadian Association of EFrye Societies and University of Ottawa –
‘Canada Corrections and Marginalized Women – Trish Monture’s Legacies’

Rakhi Ruparelia, University of Ottawa – ‘Legal Feminism and the Post-Racism
Fantasy’

Saturday, March 1, 2014

8:30 Registration

9:00 Keynote Address: Rauna Kuokkanen, Department of Political Science and
Aboriginal Studies Program, University of Toronto – ‘Indigenous Economies,
Self-Determination, and Women’s Rights’

10:20 Break

10.35 Panel III Women and Economic Development: Roadmaps and
Strategies

Louise Langevin, Faculty of Law, Laval University – ‘Gender-based Analysis of
Discrimination against Women – ‘Economic Development and Women’s
Bargaining Power’

Kate McInturff, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – ‘Gender Equality
and Women in the Arctic: Mapping the Future’

Gail Baikie, Faculty of Social Work, Dalhousie University – ‘Rhetoric and
Realities: The Mokami Status of Women Council’s Environmental Assessment
Submission’

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Panel IV Gendered Dislocations, Ruptures, and Violences

Hege Brækhus, University of Tromsø, Norway – ‘International Marriages:
Russian Women Marrying Norwegian Men’

Rachel Kohut, Arctic Institute, Montreal – ‘Imagining Birth Dislocated from
Medicine: The Interconnectedness of the State and the Birthing Process
in Canada’s North’

Monica Burman, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå
University – ‘Men’s Violence against Sami Women — A blind Swedish Spot’

Cindy Hanson, Adult Education/HRD, University of Regina, Saskatchewan –
‘Gender Lens on the Indian Residential School Claims Process’

3:00 Break

3:30 Panel V Arctic/Northern Prostitution and Sex Trafficking

Marguerite Russell, Barrister and Solicitor (Ont. and UK) – ‘Trafficking in
Women: International Legal Perspectives’

Victoria Sweet, Michigan State University College of Law – ‘Rising Waters,
Rising Threats: Human Trafficking and Other Gender-Related Crimes
in the Circumpolar Region of the United States and Canada’

Åsa Yttergren, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå University
– ‘Prostitution and Trafficking in the North of Sweden – The “Swedish Model”
in Action’

4:45 Closing discussion: publication and followup plans

The picture is of a woman’s hand holding an ulu.  The full picture can be seen at the source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 – the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives Canada.   An ulu is a “woman’s knife” ᐅᓗ.

Women use all kinds of tools, of course.  Have you seen this website – Feeding my Family ?  An eyeopener about food security in the North.  See also 15 Sw. J. Int’l L. 223 (2008-2009)
Northern Frontier, Northern Homeland: Inuit People’s Food Security in the Age of Climate Change and Arctic Melting by the University of Ottawa’s Sophie Theriault. Click here for access via Hein online (not open access),  Another article to consider is Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez (U of A) Nunavut: Whose Homeland, Whose Voices? Canadian Woman Studies26.3/4 (Winter/Spring 2008): 128-134 (also not available open access – try  via ProQuest if you have access to the database through your institution.

CFP: Feminist Legal Studies Queen's presents Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law & Justice in Development and Equality

This picture of a woman's hand holding an ulu is taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 - the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives CanadaFeminist Legal Studies Queen’s (Profs Kathleen Lahey & Bita Amani) has put out a really interesting call for papers, “Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality: In celebration of Dr. Patricia A. Monture“.  Proposals can be submitted up to October 4, 2013.

The picture is of a woman’s hand holding an ulu.  The full picture can be seen at the source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 – the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives Canada.   An ulu is a “woman’s knife” ᐅᓗ.

Women use all kinds of tools, of course.  Have you seen this website – Feeding my Family ?  An eyeopener about food security in the North.  See also 15 Sw. J. Int’l L. 223 (2008-2009)
Northern Frontier, Northern Homeland: Inuit People’s Food Security in the Age of Climate Change and Arctic Melting by the University of Ottawa’s Sophie Theriault. Click here for access via Hein online (not open access),  Another article to consider is Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez (U of A) Nunavut: Whose Homeland, Whose Voices? Canadian Woman Studies26.3/4 (Winter/Spring 2008): 128-134 (also not available open access – try  via ProQuest if you have access to the database).

 

Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality:  In celebration of Dr. Patricia A. Monture (1958-2010)

Feb. 28-March 1, 2014 in Kingston, Ontario

 

Arctic and northern regions of the globe are undergoing rapid climate, economic, and social changes. This conference will focus on how these changes affect women’s legal, economic, and social status with particular reference to challenges facing indigenous, northern, racialized, and immigrant women. Relevant legal frameworks include international human rights, including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women; constitutional provisions, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982; and domestic laws and policies. This conference is designed to accelerate access to legal and policy research concerning Arctic/northern women, people affected by changes occurring in and as the result of policies in circumpolar states, and proposals for governance and policy reforms.

 

This conference is convened in celebration of the life and work of Dr. Patricia A. Monture, Queen’s Law 1988, Hon. LL.D. (Athabaska and Queen’s), a fierce and proud Haudenosaunee woman who graced the Queen’s and Kingston communities with her tireless teachings as she confronted the realities of racism, colonialism, and Aboriginal existences. For those who wish to address the many challenges and contributions made by Dr. Monture in her work and activism, please see Malinda Smith, ‘Thunder in her soul,’ at http://www.idees-ideas.ca/blog/thunder-her-soul-remembering-patricia-monturex.

 

FLSQ invites academic and practicing lawyers, policy analysts, interdisciplinary and comparative scholars and experts, students in law and other disciplines, community members, and those involved in research and governance to submit proposals for papers that examine issues relevant to this broad area of engagement.

Proposals are invited on the following topics, as well as on others proposed in response to this call for papers:

  • First Nations, Inuit, and Metis women, indigenous women in other regions
  • The ‘paradox of plenty’ and nonrenewable resource extraction
  • Traditional economies and reciprocal relationships
  • Self-governance and political agency
  • Environmental issues, including human and ecological degradation, settlements, and human health
  • Fiscal policies and tax jurisdictions
  • Legal education and legal needs of indigenous and northern women
  • Commons, users, and concepts of property, including traditional knowledges
  • Science, nation building, and militarization in circumpolar states
  • Food, shelter, and wellbeing in northern regions
  • State systems and policy options
  • Demographics of northern and extractive regions
  • Sexual assault, trafficking, and violence
  • Globalization and interstate politics
  • Corporate governance
  • De/re/neo/colonizations
  • Economic development and social inequalities
  • Public services and accountability
  • Maternal and reproductive health
  • International human rights
  • Reproductive health and genetics
  • Law and policy reform related to any of these substantive topics, based on doctrinal, theoretical, empirical, comparative, or interdisciplinary approaches

 

Call for papers:

Submissions grounded in Aboriginal studies, domestic or international law, public policy, social anthropology, history, sociology, economics, philosophy, women’s/gender studies, human rights, or political studies are sought.

 

Date and Location:  The conference will be held at the Faculty of Law building, Macdonald Hall, 128 Union St., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario on Friday Feb. 28 and Saturday March 1, 2014.

 

Submitting paper proposals:

If you are interested in presenting a paper or organizing a panel on a specific issue, please email a short outline of your proposal (a paragraph in length) to Kathleen Lahey (at kal2@queensu.ca) or Bita Amani (at amanib@queensu.ca).  A proposal may be made at any time until October 4, 2013.  Participation will be confirmed in November 2013.

 

Travel funding:

When submitting a paper or panel proposal, please indicate whether you would be able to obtain institutional support to attend, or whether you could attend only if you receive funding from Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s.

 

Registration:

Attendance without presenting a paper is welcome, as the goal is to discuss a wide variety of equality and justice issues. Contact the organizers to indicate interest and obtain registration information. Some funding is available to assist students to attend. Registration will open on November 15.

 

 

Accommodation and childcare:

Information on accommodation will be provided on request. Anyone wanting childcare should mention this request so appropriate arrangements can be made.

 

For further information please contact:

 

Prof. Kathleen Lahey                                                  Prof. Bita Amani

Co-Director                                                                 Co-Director

Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s                                 Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s

Faculty of Law, Queen’s University                          Faculty of Law, Queen’s University

Kingston, Ontario                                                       Kingston, Ontario

kal2@queensu.ca                                                        amanib@queensu.ca

 

 

 

Robson reviews Andrews at Jotwell: The Global Problem of Women`s Equality

cover of book linking to publishers siteFind Ruthann Robson’s review of (Albany Law Dean) Penelope Andrews’ “From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights” on Jotwell, here.

At its most hopeful, Andrews’ book presents the struggle for equality in South Africa as it was mounted against the Apartheid state, resulting in a new constitutional regime devoted to transformative law and politics. Andrews attributes the fact that this transformation included gender equality to a confluence of forces, but most importantly women’s participation. She suggests that the path chosen by South Africa is a model for many other nations, stressing that the involvement of women at all levels and phases is vital.

Find other papers by Andrews here (SSRN: open source).  Warning: you`ll want to read any you haven`t already.

Consider speaking to your librarian to request that they order books which interest you, if you don’t already.

Democratic Deficits: Equality & Rep in Canadian Politics: Workshop in Mtrl November 20, 2013

A note from Trudeau Scholar Kerri Froc about this workshop to be held November 20, 2013:

Democratic Deficits? Equality and Representation in Canadian Politics / Déficits démocratiques? Égalité et représentation politique au Canada

Equality is a critical element of Canada’s representative democracy, yet it is one that our electoral system faces critical challenges in delivering. In principle, Canadians are governed under notions of voter equality, “effective representation” of diverse communities, and equal treatment of political candidates. However, the chronic under-representation of women, racial minorities and Aboriginals in our elected institutions, alleged voter suppression tactics, and electoral boundaries that dilute the votes of some Canadians suggest we still have far to go in making these ideas a practical reality. At this workshop, we will hear from academics and practitioners about the sources of under-representation and unresponsiveness and propose solutions for greater equality and fairness.

This event is being held in conjunction with the Trudeau Foundation’s 10th Annual Conference.

 

 

Agenda / Ordre du jour

8:30 – 8:45 a.m.   Welcome / Bienvenue
8:45 – 9:30 a.m.   Keynote Address / Discours-programmeJean-Pierre KingsleyFormer Chief Electoral Officer / ancien director général des élections
9:30 – 11:00 a.m.   Gender Balance in Parliament / Équilibre entre les sexes au Parlement
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.   Break / Pause
11:30 – 1:00 p.m.   Ethnocultural Diversity in Politics / Diversité ethnoculturelle en politique
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.   Lunch / Déjeuner
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.   Electoral Boundaries / Délimitation des circonscriptions électorales
3:30 – 4:00 p.m.   Break / Pause
4:00 – 5:30 p.m.   Justice in Electioneering / Justice électoraliste
5:30 – 5:45 p.m.   Conference close / Clôture de la conférence

 

Speakers / Conférenciers

Panelists will be announced in September 2013. Check back for details!

Les conférenciers seront annoncés en Septembre 2013. Revenez pour plus de détails!

 

Sessions / Séances

Gender Balance in Parliament / Équilibre entre les sexes au Parlement

More than 80% of Canadians are now governed by female premiers, and there are more women in the federal Cabinet than ever before. Paradoxically, however, women comprise only 25% of MPs, and Canada ranks 46th of 189 countries in terms of the number of nationally-elected women. How can we turn these cracks in the glass ceiling into a true breakthrough for women? This panel will discuss the reasons for women’s under-representation in Parliament, as well as possible solutions.

Plus de 80% des Canadiens sont maintenant gouvernés par des premières ministres, et nous avons plus de femmes au Cabinet que jamais. Paradoxalement, les femmes ne représentent que 25% des députés et le Canada se classe au 46ième rang sur 189 pays en termes du nombre de femmes élues à l’échelle nationale. Comment pouvons-nous transformer ces petites fissures dans le plafond de verre en véritable percée pour les femmes? Ce panel examinera les raisons de la sous-représentation des femmes au Parlement, ainsi que certaines solutions potentielles.

 

Ethnocultural Diversity in Politics / Diversité ethnoculturelle en politique

Canada’s population is becoming increasingly diverse and while ethnocultural minorities and Aboriginal peoples have made some important gains in the electoral arena, our country’s representatives largely have Anglo, Western European and Caucasian origins. Visible minorities, immigrants and First Nations are numerically under-represented. This panel will look at the representation of ethnocultural diversity in elected politics, voter attitudes toward non-White candidates and the media’s portrayal of minorities in politics. It will chart progress and gaps and pinpoint strategies for increasing diversity in Canadian political life.

La population du Canada est de plus en plus diversifiée. Mais même si les minorités ethnoculturelles et les peuples autochtones ont fait des gains importants dans l’arène électorale, les représentants de notre pays demeurent en générale anglophones, occidentaux et blancs. Les minorités visibles, les immigrants et les Premières Nations sont numériquement sous-représentés. Ce panel se penchera sur les questions de la diversité ethnoculturelle dans la politique électorale, des attitudes des électeurs à l’égard des candidats non-blancs et de la représentation médiatique des minorités visibles sur la scène politique. Le panel va identifier les progrès réalisés et exposer les lacunes ethnoculturelles dans l’espace politique national, et tentera de définir des stratégies pour accroître la diversité dans la vie politique canadienne. 

 

Electoral Boundaries / Délimitation des circonscriptions électorales

Electoral districts are the building blocks of democracy. The distribution of federal electoral districts among the provinces was recently changed by the Fair Representation Act. Independent, non-partisan commissions in each province are now redrawing electoral boundaries. Yet redistricting receives relatively little academic or judicial scrutiny in Canada, compared to other democracies. This panel will investigate the competing principles at play and the institutional context.

Les circonscriptions électorales sont les piliers de notre démocratie. La répartition des circonscriptions électorales fédérales parmi les provinces a été récemment modifiée par la Loi sur la représentation équitable. Des commissions non-partisanes et indépendantes dans chaque province s’attardent maintenant à retracer les limites des circonscriptions électorales. Au contraire de ce que l’on retrouve dans d’autres démocraties, ce redécoupage n’a soulevé que peu d’intérêt chez les universitaires canadiens ou dans la jurisprudence canadienne. Ce panel examinera les enjeux contradictoires qui influencent le contexte institutionnel de cet exercice de redécoupage.

 

Justice in Electioneering / Justice électoraliste

Canada’s election administration has recently come under stress, with the Supreme Court ruling on a disputed election in Etobicoke, Federal Court hearings into alleged “robocalls”, and allegations of improper political party financing and contributions in Quebec. This panel will explore how federal and provincial electoral administration should respond.

L’administration des élections au Canada a récemment fait l’objet de critiques sérieuses, avec la décision de la Cour suprême sur la controverse des résultats électoraux à Etobicoke, les audiences de la Cour fédérale sur les appels-robots, et les pratiques illicites de contributions politiques et de financement des partis au Québec. Ce panel explorera comment les administrations électorales fédérale et provinciales devraient répondre à ces situations problématiques.

CFProposals: Radically Rethink Marriage with @kootenaydreams & @nicolajbarker

Easing back from my vacation into the webworld.  Strangely, I didn’t miss it much this time.  I think that means that i am now clearly associating the web with work – this is not, I think, a good thing.  But this next is –  a  great looking CF Proposals via Nicola Barker (Kent) @nicolaJbarker (see previous IFLS posts re Nicola here) and Suzanne Lenon (Lethbridge) @kootenaydreams

Note that this conference might be at Onati in Spain – the fall back is ….Paris.  So there is that too.

Radically Rethinking Marriage

Deadline for Submissions: September 20, 2013 (Workshop: July 2015)

find this conference on FB, here.

Over the last few months the issue of same-sex marriage has once again received a lot of international attention with the partial repeal of DOMA in the United States, the overturning of Proposition 8 in California, and the legalization of same-sex marriage in the United Kingdom. But as with previous debates in countries that have already introduced same-sex marriage, the public debates have contained little or no critical interrogation of the institution of marriage itself. Feminist critiques of marriage, once widespread in academia, have been silenced by the difficulty of interjecting in an argument strongly shaped by discourses of love, and where the premise of the dispute is itself delimited by a framing that understands marriage as an unquestioned good that should either be protected in its ‘traditional’ form, or available to all couples. But how could feminists radically rethink marriage? What is at stake (politically, materially, affectively) in such an endeavour? What would “rethinking marriage” look like?

This two-day workshop seeks to bring together feminist scholars working across disciplines to radically rethink law(s) of and around marriage. We seek papers that offer an engaged analysis and re-imagining of marriage within law, attending to the complexities of its racial, sexual, gendered, class and colonial effects. Abstracts may engage any of the following (or other) broad themes:
• Same-sex marriage
• Polygamy
• Polyamory
• Alternative property regimes
• the ‘Beyond Marriage’ movement
• Conjugality
• Sovereignty and/or decolonization
• Marriage and wealth

In the spirit of the feminist judgments projects,* we ask that abstracts (1) identify a specific case, statute or key article and/or debate from the literature and (2) offer a re-thinking, new interpretation or rewriting: How could we decide a case or interpret a statute differently? Is it even possible to (re)imagine its transformative potentiality? How could we fill gaps in the key articles or debates, in ways that fundamentally challenge the existing legal institution of marriage? Is there a feminist alternative to marriage?

Submissions are encouraged from scholars, activists and artists and are not limited to traditional academic papers.

Once we have abstracts we will apply to hold the workshop at the International Institute for the Sociology of Law in Oñati, Spain.

If this is not possible, it will be held at the University of Kent’s campus in Paris. Participants are responsible for their own travel and health insurance, travel costs, registration fee, and accommodations.

Deadline for Submissions:

A 500 word abstract and title, along with affiliations and a short biography, should be sent in electronic form (Word document) to Suzanne Lenon, Women & Gender Studies, University of Lethbridge, suzanne.lenon@uleth.ca and Nicola Barker, Kent Law School, University of Kent, n.j.barker@kent.ac.uk by September 20, 2013.

Please do not hesitate to contact us for further information.

*For more information on the Feminist Judgment Projects, see: Women’s Court of Canada, http://womenscourt.ca/home/; Feminist Judgments Project http://www.kent.ac.uk/law/fjp/; Irish Feminist Judgments Project http://humanrights.ie/announcements/introducing-the-irish-feminist-judgments-project/; and Australian Feminist Judgments Project http://www.law.uq.edu.au/australian-feminist-judgments-project. See also E. Brems (ed.) Diversity and European Human Rights: Rewriting Judgments of the ECHR (CUP, 2013).