Tag Archives: Amanda Dale

The Fifth Estate re Wilno Murders: Why Didn’t We Know?

Last night, I watched the most recent Fifth Estate episode, about the murders of Carol Culleton, Anastasia Kuzyk, and Nathalie Warmerdam last September near Wilno. The episode asks (shows) how the criminal justice system failed these women and others in abusive relationships. Not a good choice of bedtime material. Be prepared to be outraged (and probably shed some tears).

Osgoode PhD student and long time women’s advocate Amanda Dale has a brief spot towards the end of the episode, where she responds to the due process question in such cases.

Why Didn’t We Know?

In a matter of hours last September, three women were killed near the small town of Wilno, Ontario. The man arrested and accused of their murders, Basil Borutski had a long criminal history, including charges involving two of the three women. How did the system that’s supposed to protect women go so disastrously wrong? Gillian Findlay investigates, with revealing interviews with family members, friends of victims and witnesses

 

 

Rape’s Long Shadow

The Globe & Mail recently published this article about the long-term consequences of sexual violence, featuring Amanda Dale, Executive Director of Toronto’s Barbra Schlifer Clinic and a fellow Osgoode graduate student.

Picture of Amanda Dale
Amanda Dale

A couple noteworthy points from the article:

  • Social responses to women who disclose sexual violence make a difference.

Research suggests that the reception a woman gets the first time she discloses her attack can shape her experience of trauma. With supportive reception, survivors’ psychological distress can lessen, making them less susceptible to re-victimization. But women who are dismissed when they speak up for the first time often do not talk about it again, a silence that can be extremely detrimental.

  • The current rise in awareness and disclosure needs to be matched by an increase in front-line services.

It’s irresponsible to raise awareness without raising the capacity to receive these stories,” Dale says. “We got 30 calls last week. We don’t want to keep those women waiting for a response. They’re ready. They’re calling.

Also interesting is the continued use of the term “rape” in this and other recent articles, despite the fact that rape was replaced by sexual assault in the Canadian Criminal Code back in 1983. Wondering about the reasons for this (somewhat ineffective) change in wording? See here for a helpful overview.