Tag Archives: Robert Leckey

Panels, Workshops, l'Université féministe d'été

It was a great privilege to see Sherene Razack speak today at an event organized by students at York’s Faculty of Environmental Studies. Time to thank the people -faculty, students and staff, who roll up their sleeves and make these things happen.

Here is another set of things you may wish you could be at:

 

Radical Formations: Sex, Race, Trans

How do social movements resist and react to new measures for legal equality? This interdisciplinary panel tackles this question via resistance to intersectional state violence, transgender people’s legal consciousness, and race-based critiques of rights.

Panelists:

Sharon Cowan, School of Law, University of Edinburgh

Roderick Ferguson, American Studies Department, University of Minnesota

Dean Spade, Seattle University School of Law

Panel discussion followed by a reception sponsored by IGSF

Organized by Robert Leckey, William Dawson Scholar, Faculty of Law, in collaboration with IGSF, funded by a SSHRC Connection Grant.

via Radical Formations: Sex, Race, Trans.

A bit closer in time and closer to [here – Toronto, that is] this one is this weekend, in Toronto (includes a penal on gendering South Asian Studies)

 Critical Approaches to South Asian Studies Workshop (April 5, 2013)

[website with full program : http://www.yorku.ca/ycar/Events/south_asia.html]
The YCAR South Asian Studies Workshop will offer an intimate forum for exploring research and methodological issues in the study of South Asia and South Asian Diasporas. The workshop, which is being organized by YCAR’s South Asia Research Group (SARG), will be a step towards building a network of scholars, artists and community organizers working on South Asia and South Asian Diasporas at York University and in the GTA.

 

And this one as well:

Women’s Quests for Rights in the Middle East and North Africa: Contestations, Complexities, Contradictions (April 5-6, 2013)
The Centre for Feminist Research presents panels with leading international scholars and activists. Full programme here.

To register and purchase food tickets, please email cfr@yorku.ca. programme and details available on conference webpage: cfr.info.yorku.ca/wqr

Later this summer at Université Laval, TECHNOLOGIES Libération ou exploitation des femmes?, UNIVERSITÉ FÉMINISTE D’ÉTÉ  (Mai 19-24, 2013). 

Full programme & information here.

Les développements technologiques considérables des dernières décennies influencent profondément les représentations de soi et du monde, les conditions de vie et le changement social. Si personne, aujourd’hui, ne voudrait se priver des avantages qui en découlent, force est de constater que, en matière de technologies, des inégalités particulièrement marquées existent entre les hommes et les femmes ainsi qu’entre différentes régions dans le monde. De plus, l’ampleur, la rapidité et la complexité des transformations qui nous touchent directement et indirectement font en sorte qu’il est difficile de se tenir à jour et de conserver une distance critique. Pour sa 11e édition, l’Université féministe d’été vous convie à Québec, du 19 au 24 mai 2013, pour une semaine intensive et conviviale d’échanges, de ressourcement et de réseautage en compagnie de spécialistes œuvrant dans différents domaines et disciplines.

Uncomfortable Marriage: Nicola Barker's book & Leckey reviews Joshi on Jotwell

Here at Jotwell, McGill’s Robert Leckey has reviewed London based writer and UCL-affiliated Yuvraj Joshi’s Respectable Queerness.

On Joshi’s reading, and it is a fair one, the push for same-sex marriage has proceeded less by demanding respect than by attempting to demonstrate gay men’s and lesbians’ respectability. The agency associated with respectability is a key analytical insight: while assimilation refers to pressures imposed by the mainstream, respectability gestures to efforts made by gay men and lesbians to remake themselves as worthy of recognition. Think of the factual accounts of model plaintiffs advanced to courts in same-sex marriage litigation, which were advanced in order to establish couples’ stability and heteronormativity.

Check out the review and the original article.

Also touching on the respectability point as part of a much larger development of the feminist critique of same-sex marriage is Dr. Nicola Barker in Not the Marrying Kind: A Feminist Critique of Same-Sex Marriage (Palgrave-MacMillan Socio-Legal Studies 2012)  (not that Nicola Barker, this one, from Kent Law School (UK)).  You can hear her discuss the book here, podcast from Feminist Current. You can also download a sample chapter from the publisher here

Not the Marrying Kind is a new and comprehensive exploration of the contemporary same-sex marriage debates in several jurisdictions including Australia, Canada, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States. It departs from much of the existing scholarship on same-sex marriage, which argues either for or against marriage for same-sex couples. Instead, this book begins from a critical analysis of the institution of marriage itself (as well as separate forms of relationship recognition, such as civil partnership, PaCS, domestic partnership) and asks whether and how feminist critiques of marriage might be applied specifically to same-sex marriage. In doing this, the author combines the theories of second wave feminism with insights from contemporary queer theory.

 

New on SSRN: Face to Face by Robert Leckey (McGill)

Robert Leckey (McGill, other work on SSRN here) has posted Face to Face on SSRN

This draft paper uses queer theory, specifically literature on Bowers v. Hardwick, to analyze debates over legislation proposed in Quebec regarding covered faces. Queer theory sheds light on legal responses to the veil. Parliamentary debates in Quebec reconstitute the polity, notably as secular and united. The paper highlights the contradictory and unstable character of four binaries: legislative text versus social practice, act versus status, majority versus minority, and knowable versus unknowable. As with contradictory propositions about homosexuality, contradiction does not undermine discourse but makes it stronger and more agile.

Leckey likes Monk (lots!) at jotwell equality: The Problem of (condemning) Homophobic Bullying

Even as we celebrate the news that the UN Sec’y General has said that homophobic bullying is a grave human rights violation,

It affects young people all the way through to adulthood, causing enormous and unnecessary suffering. Bullied children may become depressed and drop out of school. Some are even driven to suicide.

can i urge you all to take a look at Robert Leckey’s review of  Daniel Monk (Birkbeck), Challenging Homophobic Bullying in Schools: The Politics of Progress, 7 (2) Int’l J. L. Context 181 (2011at Jotwell Equality?  And then of course, read the original article here (not available free of charge as far as I can tell, curses! *tangent: see Danah Boyd’s excellent and important ‘rant’ on academic publishing here)?  Leckey writes approvingly (inter alia) of Monk’s “counterintuitive” argument that:

the problematization of homophobic bullying has ushered in a shift by which the negative characteristics once associated with homosexuality are now associated with the victims of bullying. “Development into successful normal adulthood is not ‘arrested’ by paternal or maternal attachment, but rather by homophobia itself. In other words, the development question now is not, ‘What makes someone homosexual?’, but instead ‘What makes someone behave in a way that fails to conform to heteronormative behaviour’.” The queer youth remains “a reassuringly distinct and tragic ‘other’ from that of the heterosexual.” Now the developmental cause is not homosexuality, but bullying. The upshot? Queer youth still need help.