STUDENT DAYS: SHUT UP AND WRITE! AND IFLS SOCIALS

In an effort to cultivate the feminist (and feminist-curious) student community at Osgoode, and to use the comfy couches in the IFLS space, we will be starting a couple of exciting new initiatives for students this year:

Shut Up and Write! – 2nd  Wednesday of the month @ 12:30-2:30

Shut Up and Write! began as a writers’ meet-up group in San Francisco. The idea is to fight off the two great student foes—isolation and procrastination—by meeting up to focus on writing together. PhD student Terrine Friday got this started at Osgoode last year and we want to keep it alive! So get out of your carrel/library/head and come work through those writing blocks in a supportive environment!

Each Shut up and Write! session includes:

  • 10 minutes for introductions and chat
  • 2-3 rounds of writing Pomodoros (each Pomodoro includes 25 minutes of intensive writing plus a 5 minute break)
  • Time to discuss your work and get feedback from fellow students

We start on Sept 9, and there will be snacks!

pic of notebook and laptop

 

IFLS Socials – 4th Wednesday of the month @ 12:30-2

A chance to discuss feminist issues, develop new initiatives, get to know fellow students, and just hang out. Bring your lunch (except on Sept 23 — see below!)

We will begin on Sept 23rd with a special “Meet the Director” event. IFLS Director Prof Ruth Buchanan and Graduate Student Coordinator Dana Phillips (that’s me) will be there to welcome you to the IFLS space and community. Finger foods will be served.

Here is the fall schedule:

Sept 9, 12:30-2:30 — Shut up and Write!

Sept 23, 12:30-2 — IFLS Social: Meet the Director

Oct 14, 12:30-2:30 — Shut up and Write!

Oct 28, 12:30-2 – IFLS Social

Nov 11, 12:30-2:30 – Shut up and Write!

Nov 25, 12:30-2 – IFLS Social

December – TBA

Shut Up and Write! and IFLS Socials will take place in the IFLS/Nathanson Centre Common Space in Rm 3067.  All JD and graduate students are welcome. 

pic of IFLS/Nathanson common space in Room 3067
IFLS/Nathanson common space in Room 3067

Students who would like to use this space for meetings etc. on other Wednesdays @12:30 (when there are no planned events) are welcome to do so provided that they give advance notice via email to Lielle Gonslaves.

We start on September 9 with our first Shut Up and Write! Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

 

 

CFP: Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the 2016 LSA Annual Meeting in New Orleans

New Orleans themed face masks
CC image courtesy of David Ohmer on Flickr

For those thinking of attending the Law and Society Association’s Annual Meeting in New Orleans next June, take note! From the Planning Committee:

Call for Papers – Friday September 18th Deadline Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting New Orleans, June 2-5, 2016

Dear friends and colleagues,

We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in 2016.

Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: www.lawandsociety.org/NewOrleans2016/neworleans2016.html.

Within Law & Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is belonging, place, and visions of law and social change. We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.

A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject. Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a chair for the panel and a commentator for each individual paper. As a condition of participating as a panelist, you must also agree to serve as a chair or commentator for another panel or participant. We will of course take into account your scheduling and topic preferences to the degree possible.

The duties of a chair are to organize the panel logistically, including registering it online with the LSA, and moderating the panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before their upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for assigning commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter. The duties of a commentator are to read one paper and provide verbal comments as well as brief written (email is fine) comments.

If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please email an abstract or summary, along with your name and a title, to Jessica Clarke at jessicaclarke@umn.edu. There is no need to upload the document to the TWEN site this year. Note that LSA is imposing a new requirement that your summary be at least 1,000 words long. Although a shorter summary will suffice for our purposes, you will be required to upload a 1,000 word summary in advance of LSA’s deadline on

October 15. If you are already planning a LSA session with at least four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Jessica know.

In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion. If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please let us know. Please note that for roundtables, organizers are now required to provide a 500 word summary of the topic and the contributions they expect the proposed participants to make. Please also note that LSA rules limit you to participating only once as a paper panelist or roundtable participant.

Please submit all proposals by Friday, September 18. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. In the past, we have attempted to accommodate as many panelists as possible, but have been unable to accept all proposals. If we are unable to accept your proposal for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.

We hope you’ll join us in New Orleans to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.

Best,

LSA Planning Committee

Jessica Clarke
Jill Hasday
Jessica Knouse
Elizabeth Kukura
Seema Mohapatra
Marc Spindelman

 

Rape’s Long Shadow

The Globe & Mail recently published this article about the long-term consequences of sexual violence, featuring Amanda Dale, Executive Director of Toronto’s Barbra Schlifer Clinic and a fellow Osgoode graduate student.

Picture of Amanda Dale
Amanda Dale

A couple noteworthy points from the article:

  • Social responses to women who disclose sexual violence make a difference.

Research suggests that the reception a woman gets the first time she discloses her attack can shape her experience of trauma. With supportive reception, survivors’ psychological distress can lessen, making them less susceptible to re-victimization. But women who are dismissed when they speak up for the first time often do not talk about it again, a silence that can be extremely detrimental.

  • The current rise in awareness and disclosure needs to be matched by an increase in front-line services.

It’s irresponsible to raise awareness without raising the capacity to receive these stories,” Dale says. “We got 30 calls last week. We don’t want to keep those women waiting for a response. They’re ready. They’re calling.

Also interesting is the continued use of the term “rape” in this and other recent articles, despite the fact that rape was replaced by sexual assault in the Canadian Criminal Code back in 1983. Wondering about the reasons for this (somewhat ineffective) change in wording? See here for a helpful overview.

 

 

grad student job opportunity: research on gender equality in EU policy processes

I’m very pleased to be working with the IFLS as the graduate student coordinator!  One of my goals for the coming year is to find new ways for the IFLS to support JD and grad students interested in feminist legal studies.  On that note, here is an interesting grad student job opportunity from the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR) at York:

Interested in gender studies?  Interested in European studies? Interested in policy studies?

We currently looking to hire graduate research assistants on a recently-funded Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council research program that brings together scholars and policymakers from Canada and Europe to study how the problem of gender inequality is (and is not addressed) in European Union policy processes.

Ideally, you are:

-an MA or PhD student in a social science discipline

-have some background in gender studies (e.g., relevant coursework)

-have some background in and/or are interested in European and policy studies.

If you are interested, please send a letter of interest along with your your academic transcripts and a resume/CV to: hmacrae@yorku.ca.
Prof. Heather MacRae Department of Political Science York University

You can learn more about Dr MacRae’s work here.

 

Introducing Dana Phillips: IFLS Graduate Student Coordinator

picture of Dana PhillipsThe IFLS has hired a graduate student coordinator for 2015-16! Dana Phillips  completed her J.D. at the University of Victoria, and articled at the National Judicial Institute in Ottawa.  She is currently completing her master’s thesis in criminal law and feminist legal theory at Osgoode Hall Law School, under the supervision of Professor Benjamin Berger.

In her doctoral work beginning this fall, Dana will continue to explore the themes of her master’s research under Professor Berger’s supervision, with an added focus on evidence and epistemology.

Her work with the IFLS will focus on connections between the IFLS and students (both JD and graduate students), social media and a few other projects.  Got ideas on what the IFLS could offer students? Let us know! More on these initiatives later – when the summer writing blitz slows down.