Tag Archives: gender

Reclaiming our Narratives: Conversations on Gender and Racial Profiling in Toronto

GRP - PosterThis event has been fully booked for a while.  It’s tomorrow at Osgoode, organized by a dynamic group of women and a great collection of organizations (see below for a complete list).  IFLS is pleased to be a sponsor of this event and once the post-event report is finished, we’ll hope to have it available on this blog.

You can find a full description of the event below – or click here for a program in pdf.

Reclaiming Our Narratives: Conversations on Gender and Racial Profiling in Toronto 

Saturday, November 28, 2015, 9:30AM to 6:30PM

We all seem to be talking about racial profiling – from lawyers to police officers; from the media to politicians; from people who are profiled every day to those who have never been subject to the experience. But what aren’t we talking about when we talk about racial profiling?
Join us on November 28, 2015, as we discuss the many ways gender impacts racial profiling. We will highlight the often silenced stories of women, girls and trans people, and their experiences with racial profiling — whether at the border or in jails, whether it’s the direct experience of being profiled or the indirect experience of parents and supporters of those who are profiled.

10:00am: Keynote 11:00am: Police brutality and incarceration 12:00pm: Border policing 1:00pm: Lunch & free clothing bank provided by Windfall Clothing 2:00pm: Racial profiling and reproductive justice 3:00pm: Youth experiences 4:00pm: Closing plenary: remedies and resistance
Accessibility:
We know these conversations can be traumatizing for people who are forced to live with the experience of being profiled. We will strive to create a safe and accessible space for speakers, facilitators, and attendees by providing the following services throughout the conference:
active listeners and/or counsellors; ASL language interpretation; child-minding;  Halal food options; gender-neutral washrooms;  room accessibility for mobility devices and tokens for transportation support.
A final report detailing the conference will be produced and distributed. We will also explore other ways to share the event’s key insights.
Organizing Partners:
This event is the collective effort of a number of people and organizations, including
Across Boundaries (rep: Idil Abdillahi); Andrea Anderson, PhD Candidate, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University; Anti-Black Racism Network (rep: Idil Abdillahi); Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law (rep: Fathima Cader); Harmony Movement (rep: Brittany Andrew-Amofah); METRAC (rep: Jessica Mustachi); Network to Eliminate Police Violence (rep: Kimalee Phillip)

 

York's Centre for Feminist Research presents Barbara Baird on Race, Gender, HIV and Australian Criminal law

Centre for Feminist Research presents

Visiting Scholar Dr. Barbara Baird (Flinders)

“Endangering Life: The Raced Politics of Gender in an Australian Case of the Criminalization of Exposure to HIV” 

introduced by Professor David Murray

Wednesday, October 8, 3-5pm, 280N York Lanes

Please RSVP to this event by emailing juliapyr@yorku.ca.

Refreshments provided.

This paper tells a story of the criminalisation of exposure to HIV in recent times in Australia. It concerns John Chan, an Australian citizen of Sudanese background living in Adelaide, South Australia. Mr Chan came to Australia as a refugee in 1999. In 2004 he was diagnosed with HIV and, after first coming to the attention of the South Australian Health Department authorities, in 2009 he was arrested on a charge of ‘Endangering Life’ for having unprotected (consensual) sex with three women and thus exposing them to the virus. In mid 2011 he was sentenced to five and a half years in gaol. The paper uses John Chan’s story as a case study through which to analyse some aspects of contemporary gender relations in Australia. Its focus is on the position of white women in a cultural and political environment characterised by both conservative and neo-liberal discourses of gender and sexuality.

Barbara Baird is an Associate Professor in Women’s Studies at Flinders University in South Australia. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Feminist Research at York. Her research focuses on histories and cultural politics of sexuality and reproduction in contemporary Australia, with particular attention to their shaping by discourses of race and national identity. She is particularly interested in the politics of abortion and is currently embarking on a cultural history of the provision of abortion services in Australia since 1990. She is also part of a collaborative project to historicise sexual citizenship in Australia. Her work is widely published in journals of history and gender and sexuality studies.

via CFR.

Empiricism and Equality: Studying Fathers’ Rights – Robson reviews Behre at Jotwell Equality

Empiricism and Equality: Studying Fathers’ Rights – Jotwell: Equality.

Very interesting, go and have a look at the review – and the article (Kelly A. Behre, Digging Beneath the Equality Language: The Influence of the Fathers’ Rights Movement on Intimate Partner Violence Public Policy Debates and Family Law Reform, 21 Wm. & Mary J.  Women & L. (forthcoming 2014), available at SSRN.).

While discussions, critiques, and analysis of the equality rhetoric of the international fathers’ rights movements are not novel, Kelly Behre’s article, Digging Beneath the Equality Language: The Influence of the Fathers’ Rights Movement on Intimate Partner Violence Public Policy Debates and Family Law Reform, does – – – as the title promises – – – “dig beneath.” The article’s first section is an excellent overview of the equality narratives of the fathers’ rights movement, including the appeal to civil rights movements and the use of both discrimination and gender-neutral tropes. But the real contribution of Behre’s article is her exploration of the relationship between empiricism and equality. [from Ruthann Robson’s explanation of why she likes the article – lots]

 

IFLS Speakers Series: Dr. Yofi Tirosh (Tel Aviv) Who Cooked the Current Middle East Crisis (and Who is Going to do the Dishes)?

Monday October 6  230-4 IKB (Osgoode Hall) Rm 2027Oct6YofiTirosh

Who Cooked the Current Middle East Crisis (and Who is Going to do the Dishes)? A Human Rights Perspective

Dr. Yofi Tirosh (Tel Aviv Law)                                                   

This talk, followed by a Q & A session, will provide a scholarly and a personal take on the current geo-political crisis in the Middle East. As a law professor, a human rights activist, and a regular media contributor of legal interpretation, Dr. Tirosh will point to the covert relationship between the status of women and minorities in Israel, Palestine, and Gaza, and the unprecedented military and symbolic violence of summer of 2014. The presentation will use satirical video clips, TV commercials, as well as Supreme Court rulings from Israel to throw some light on the bitter conflicts over (breast-)milk and honey.

Poster for sharing/printing here

Dr. Tirosh is a Senior Lecturer at the Tel Aviv University Faculty of Law and a 2014-16 Senior Fellow at Hebrew University’s Martin Buber Society of Fellows. Tirosh teaches labor and employment law, antidiscrimination law, food law, body and law, and feminist jurisprudence. Her research interests include affirmative action, bioethics, law and culture. The working title of her book in progress is Feminist Libertarianism.  Dr. Tirosh is a graduate of The University of Michigan Law School, were she was a graduate fellow at Michigan’s Institute for the Humanities. She served as a Visiting Professor at Georgetown Law Centre in fall 2012, and as a Hauser Fellow at NYU Law School in 2008. Alongside research and teaching, Tirosh gives workshops on writing blocks, women in academia, and job talks. As a human rights activist, she is the leading public voice in the efforts to stop the growing sex segregation in public and private spaces in Israel. She is a regular contributor of legal interpretation to leading media venues in Israel.

Light refreshments will be provided

Questions? Please contact the IFLS administrator, Lielle Gonsalves LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.caOct6YofiTirosh

 

Judges & Daughters (who is checking this factor wrt new SCC appointments)

h/t Kristina Mansveld

Assuming this government isn’t going to get around to appointing a woman for some time (“be patient”, “there aren’t as many female candidates”, et boring cetera), here’s another factor we could consider, as illustrated in a study by profs from Rochester & Harvard:

Another Factor Said to Sway Judges to Rule for Women’s Rights: A Daughter – NYTimes.com.

See also the issue of Justice Blackmun of SCOTUS, his daughter, and Roe: here.

Slightly heartwarming, in a way.  Although it does raise some VERY pointed questions about race based cases, doesn’t it?  To be fair, at the end of the NYT article, the author suggests other new experiences which might affect our view of the world.

I couldn’t quite tell, from the article, whether the effect was as pronounced for women as for men, so I’m interested in that as well.  I should get the study, which is here.