Tag Archives: feminism

Weekend Read: Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay in the VQR

Roxane Gay, a writer I really like, in the latest issue of the Virginia Quarterly Review, on being a bad feminist.

Will no doubt resonate with many, and perhaps slightly reassure? Some of the beats i like are er, slightly misogynistic.  And in part because of that, I try not to be the feminist police.  But I don’t buy the argument that feminism means validating all the choices any woman, anywhere, ever makes as inherently feminist… Anyway, this is a nice weekend read.

My favorite definition of a feminist is one offered by Su, an Australian woman who, when interviewed for Kathy Bail’s 1996 anthology DIY Feminism, described them simply as “women who don’t want to be treated like shit.” This definition is pointed and succinct, but I run into trouble when I try to expand it. I fall short as a feminist. I feel like I am not as committed as I need to be, that I am not living up to feminist ideals because of who and how I choose to be. I feel this tension constantly.

Roxane Gay, via VQR » Bad Feminist.

When you are done and want to know, ‘Who is this Roxane Gay and where else can I read her work?’, she has a blog and here is a link to her writing at The Rumpus, where she is essays editor.  She seems far too cool to be a professor, but apparently not.  For those of you who discover your new best (writer-you-want-to-be-best-friends-with) through this post – you’re welcome! I will pass your thanks to @lawandlit who brought me to Roxane Gay through this article on trigger warnings.

 

 

Law, Feminism, [short] Fiction: A reading group at Osgoode (York)

a casual reading group looking at short fiction, assorted wednesday afternoons at 230

Please let us know of your interest by picking up readings from Lielle Gonsalves in the IFLS/Nathanson suite on the third floor of the law school — and putting your name on the Reading Group list.

Location TBA (watch this space/or if you put yourself on our list, we’ll send you a note)

Click here for a pdf poster to print or send.

Sonia Lawrence & Kate Sutherland

 

September 26

women lawyers
Margaret Atwood, “Weight” (1991)
Michele Martinez, “The Mother” (2009)
Ruthann Robson, “His Sister” (2000)

October 10

women & criminality, murder, prison
Laura Lippman, “The Crack Cocaine Diet” (2005)
Sharyn McCrumb, “A Predatory Woman” (1991)

October 17

classic feminist SF; reimagining reproduction,

gender, & gender relations;colonialism, dystopia
Octavia Butler, “Bloodchild” (1984)
Raccoona Sheldon (aka Alice Sheldon, aka  James Tiptree, Jr.),“The Screwfly Solution” (1977)
Lisa Tuttle, “Wives” (1976)

November 7

abortion; infanticide; class; race; immigration
Heather Birrell, “Frogs” (2012)
Nadine Gordimer, “Happy Event” (1952)

November 14

women lawyers; personal injury, negligence,

damages

Judith McCormack, “The Rule of Last Clear Chance” (2003)

December 5

academia; illness; disability; sexuality; torts;

environmentalism
Ruthann Robson, “black squirrels” (2000)

 

 

a little bit new: Knop, Michaels and Riles, From Multiculturalism to Technique Feminism, Culture, and the Conflict of Laws Style”

Because I can definitely use help in negotiating the issues raised by Knop, Michaels and Riles.

“From Multiculturalism to Technique: Feminism, Culture, and the Conflict of Laws Style” By Karen Knop, Ralf Michaels & Annelise Riles, 64 Stan. L. Rev. 589 (2012) |

 

The German Chancellor, the French President, and the British Prime Minister have each grabbed world headlines with pronouncements that their states’ policies of multiculturalism have failed. As so often, domestic debates about multiculturalism, as well as foreign policy debates about human rights in non-Western countries, revolve around the treatment of women. Yet feminists are no longer even certain how to frame, let alone resolve, the issues raised by veiling, polygamy, and other cultural practices oppressive to women by Western standards. Feminism has become perplexed by the very concept of “culture.” This impasse is detrimental both to women’s equality and to concerns for cultural autonomy. We propose shifting gears. Our approach draws on what, at first glance, would seem to be an unpromising legal paradigm for feminism—the highly technical field of conflict of laws (conflicts). Using the nonintuitive hypothetical of a dispute in California between a Japanese father and daughter over a transfer of shares, we demonstrate the contribution that conflicts can make. Whereas Western feminists are often criticized for dwelling on “exotic” cultural practices to the neglect of other important issues affecting the lives of women in those communities or states, our choice of this hypothetical not only joins the correctives, but also shows how economic issues, in fact, take us back to the same impasse. Even mundane issues of corporate law prove to be dizzyingly indeterminate and complex in their feminist and cultural dimensions.
What makes conflict of laws a better way to recognize and do justice to the different dimensions of our hypothetical, surprisingly, is viewing conflicts as technique. More generally, conflicts can offer a new approach to the feminism/
culture debate—if we treat its technicalities not as mere means to an end but as an intellectual style. Trading the big picture typical of public law for the specificity and constraint of technical form provides a promising style of capturing,
revealing, and ultimately taking a stand on the complexities confronting feminists as multiculturalism is challenged here and abroad.

Law, Feminism, [short] Fiction: A reading group at Osgoode (York)

a casual reading group looking at short fiction, assorted wednesday afternoons at 230

Please let us know of your interest by picking up readings from Lielle Gonsalves in the IFLS/Nathanson suite on the third floor of the law school — and putting your name on the Reading Group list.

Location TBA (watch this space/or if you put yourself on our list, we’ll send you a note)

Click here for a pdf poster to print or send.

Sonia Lawrence & Kate Sutherland

 

September 26

women lawyers
Margaret Atwood, “Weight” (1991)
Michele Martinez, “The Mother” (2009)
Ruthann Robson, “His Sister” (2000)

October 10

women & criminality, murder, prison
Laura Lippman, “The Crack Cocaine Diet” (2005)
Sharyn McCrumb, “A Predatory Woman” (1991)

October 17

[cxld]

 

November 7

abortion; infanticide; class; race; immigration
Heather Birrell, “Frogs” (2012)
Nadine Gordimer, “Happy Event” (1952)

November 14

classic feminist SF; reimagining reproduction,

gender, & gender relations;colonialism, dystopia
Octavia Butler, “Bloodchild” (1984)
Raccoona Sheldon (aka Alice Sheldon, aka  James Tiptree, Jr.),“The Screwfly Solution” (1977)
Lisa Tuttle, “Wives” (1976)

 

 

December 5

women lawyers; personal injury, negligence,

damages

Judith McCormack, “The Rule of Last Clear Chance” (2003)

academia; illness; disability; sexuality; torts;

environmentalism
Ruthann Robson, “black squirrels” (2000)

 

 

a little something from the past

The best summer “work” project i have is that the IFLS needs to put some stuff up on the walls, now that we have walls.  Here are some pics from the Toronto Archives that I found noodling around

link to page describing the Pamela Harris fonds in the Toronto Archives. 

link to Pamela Harris’s Sumach Press Book, Faces of Feminism

Got ideas? Let me know. Budget for this project-get-art-on-walls is what you would expect for a feminist project.