Category Archives: What we’re thinking/reading/doing (IFLS blog)

What’s interesting these days?

#LawNeedsFeminismBecause #LeDroitABesoinDuFéminismCar

The Feminist Collective of McGill Law created this campaign and invited law students across Canada to participate by finishing the sentence Law Needs Feminism Because…/ Le Droit A Besoin Du Féminism Car…. and becoming part of a photo project with other legal scholars (students and professors).

See McGill Law students (and Profs) in all their feminist glory here: http://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/ 

Join the IFLS and the Osgoode Feminist Caucus Friday Feb 3, 2017, 10-1230 in the Faculty Lounge (2027)of Osgoode Hall Law School from 10-12:30.  Think about what you want to say, or let it come to you on the spot.  We will have coffee, chai (if Sonia gets up early enough), a photographer and good company*.  Critical feminist discussion is encouraged and welcome.  Please wear solid colours!

Need an appointment? Tell us when you plan to come and we’ll bump you to the front of the line when you arrive (email slawrence@osgoode.yorku.ca).

[brought to you by the Osgoode Feminist Caucus & the Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies]

If you don’t have class, why don’t you come at 12 and stay for the IFLS Feminist Friday with Professor Jula Hughes: “Politics is Women’s Work: A gender lens on the duty to consult”   
3-Feb-2017 12:30 PM – 02:00 PM 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School
Lunch will be served at this talk, so please RSVP www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp


Abstract:  In Atlantic Canada, Indigenous women participate in the political and organizational leadership of off-reserve and non-Status organizations like Native Councils and Friendship Centres to a much higher degree than Canadian women participate in political leadership at any level. In a series of interviews and through research projects in collaboration with Indigenous women leaders, I have asked how these women leaders came to their political work and explored their political practice. In this presentation I report on findings from this research. What emerges is an understanding of the role of women in Wabanaki society that is anchored in a traditional division of labour that emphasized community leadership as women’s work. Indigenous women leaders also understand their work as an important response to the historical experience of gender discrimination under the Indian Act. They note that governments perpetuate its gender discriminatory effects by failing to engage with and consult off-reserve and non-Status populations and advocate for a development of the constitutional duty to consult that promotes gender equality.
Dr. Jula Hughes researches in the areas of criminal law, Indigenous governance & Aboriginal law, and judicial ethics. She was the lead researcher on a multidisciplinary, community-driven research project on the duty to consult with urban Aboriginal organizations in Atlantic Canada conducted by the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network.  Her current work considers the duty to consult through a gender lens.  The research explores Indigenous women’s governance and living experiences in Eastern Canadian urban settings.

Screenshot at very shrunk size of McGill Feminist Collective's project page of photos.
http://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/  screenshot

February 3 1230-2, Jula Hughes: Politics is Women’s Work: A gender lens on the duty to consult

IFLS talk "Politics is Women’s Work - A Gender Lens on the Duty to Consult" Dr. Jula Hughes  Date: 3-Feb-2017 Time: 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM Location: 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School  Dr. Jula Hughes researches in the areas of criminal law, Indigenous governance & Aboriginal law, and judicial ethics. She was the lead researcher on a multidisciplinary, community-driven research project on the duty to consult with urban Aboriginal organizations in Atlantic Canada conducted by the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network.  Her current work considers the duty to consult through a gender lens.  The research explores Indigenous women's governance and living experiences in Eastern Canadian urban settings.  Kindly RSVP www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp
IFLS talk “Politics is Women’s Work – A Gender Lens on the Duty to Consult” Dr. Jula Hughes (UNB Law)

3-Feb-2017     12:30 PM – 02:00 PM
2027 Osgoode Hall Law School
Ignat Kaneff Building (IKB Bldg #32 here)

Public transit directions to York University)

Kindly RSVP, as lunch will be served:  www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

Abstract:  In Atlantic Canada, Indigenous women participate in the political and organizational leadership of off-reserve and non-Status organizations like Native Councils and Friendship Centres to a much higher degree than Canadian women participate in political leadership at any level. In a series of interviews and through research projects in collaboration with Indigenous women leaders, I have asked how these women leaders came to their political work and explored their political practice. In this presentation I report on findings from this research. What emerges is an understanding of the role of women in Wabanaki society that is anchored in a traditional division of labour that emphasized community leadership as women’s work. Indigenous women leaders also understand their work as an important response to the historical experience of gender discrimination under the Indian Act. They note that governments perpetuate its gender discriminatory effects by failing to engage with and consult off-reserve and non-Status populations and advocate for a development of the constitutional duty to consult that promotes gender equality.

Dr. Jula Hughes researches in the areas of criminal law, Indigenous governance & Aboriginal law, and judicial ethics. Find some of her work here, on SSRN. She was the lead researcher on a multidisciplinary, community-driven research project on the duty to consult with urban Aboriginal organizations in Atlantic Canada conducted by the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network. Her current work considers the duty to consult through a gender lens. The research explores Indigenous women’s governance and living experiences in Eastern Canadian urban settings.

 

 

 

[Jan16] Tell: Making Poetry from Law (at Osgoode)


all information available in text belowTell: making poetry from law
Soraya Peerbaye and Sheila Batacharya in conversation with Kate Sutherland

photo of Soraya Peerbayephoto of Professor Sutherlandphoto of S. Batacharya

Monday January 16 2017
1030-1230
Osgoode Hall 4034 (in the Faculty Wing)

In writing the award winning Tell: Poems for a Girlhood, poet Soraya Peerbaye was deeply influenced by legal materials from the trial of the murderers of Reena Virk and the scholarship of Dr. Sheila Batacharya on reading the case through the lenses of race, crime and law.

Join us to hear Soraya Peerbaye and Sheila Batacharya in discussion with Osgoode Professor Kate Sutherland about the story of Reena Virk, the process by which legal materials can be turned into poetry, and the power and potential of this kind of work.

Coffee Tea and Snacks
Please RSVP www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

Soraya Peerbaye’s most recent collection of poetry, Tell: Poems for a Girlhood (Pedlar Press, 2015), won the Trillium Book Award for Poetry in English and was a finalist for the Griffin Poetry prize. Her first collection, Poems for the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (Goose Lane Editions, 2009) was short-listed for the Gerald Lampert Award. Her poems have appeared in Red Silk: An Anthology of South Asian Women Poets, and the chapbook anthology Translating Horses, among others. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Guelph.

Dr. Sheila Batacharya completed her PhD at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto. She has taught education, women’s and gender studies, criminology and sociology courses at several colleges and universities in Southern Ontario. Sheila’s research about the murder of Reena Virk includes a published book, co-edited with Dr. Mythili Rajiva, entitled Reena Virk: Critical Perspectives on a Canadian Murder (2010). Her research about embodiment, pedagogy and decolonization includes a forthcoming collection co-edited with Yuk-Lin Renita Wong. Her research in this area is fueled by her experiences teaching yoga and her curiosity and concern with articulating and practicing attunement to social-sentient embodied experiences in formal education and community contexts. At present, Sheila is pursuing TESL Ontario certification to teach English as a second or additional language.

Dr. Kate Sutherland is a professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, and a published author and poet.  Her most recent work is How to Draw a Rhinoceros (Book Thug, 2016), and she is the host and producer of the podcast On the Line: Conversations about Poetry.   You can follow her on Twitter: @lawandlit.

IFLS Book Club, 2016/17

Last year, the IFLS revived a feminist book club tradition at Osgoode. The group will continue this year, and we would like to invite those interested in taking part for the year to join. All are welcome, regardless of whether your research interests align with the IFLS. We try to meet about once a month to discuss a book, graphic novel, poetry anthology or some other form of the written word, from a feminist perspective. There are usually treats!  If you’re interested or have any questions, please send an email to Dana at danaphillips@osgoode.yorku.ca. Looking forward to seeing faces old and new as the school year starts up again.