All posts by Sonia Lawrence

Empowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique: Talk by Terezinha da Silva March 20 2017

EmpowEmpowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique. Talk by Terezinha da Silva. Monday, March 20, 2017 Kaneff Tower 519 2:00am – 4:30pm All are welcome! The last decade has seen a coal mining boom in northern Mozambique with the arrival of Riversdale, Rio Tinto, Vale and Jindal. The Mozambican government has welcomed these investments as the guarantee of economic growth, jobs and poverty alleviation. Brazil has given strong backing to its corporations in Africa, within an upbeat narrative of South-South solidarity. For the mining communities, it has been a story of unfulfilled promises. There have been forced resettlements of traditional farmers without prior consultation or respect for land rights. Vale has relocated them in a rural area with houses, schools and a health post but no land or means of livelihood. The influx of miners has exacerbated already scarce social and infrastructure in the region, overcrowding roads, schools and hospitals and creating social problems. While there have been many general studies of impacted communities, WLSA’s research project is the first study looking specifically at the impact on women and girls from a gender perspective. The study analyses, in context of resettlements, how women and men produce their responses as a result of mining actions. Terezinha da Silva will talk about the community workshops based on the research and the challenges of taking up these issues in communities with patriarchal traditions still deeply embedded. Speaker’s Bio: Terezinha da Silva (Mozambique) is currently the national coordinator of WLSA Mozambique (Women and Law in Southern Africa), a regional NGO working on women human’s rights. She is also the board member of different NGO’s working on themes related to community development, social studies, children, gender and women issues and ageing. Her other professional experiences are related to management and institutional development. She worked for many years at the Ministry of Health and Social Action. She also has a wide range of experiences in teaching planning and management, including curriculum development of national courses. Her research experience include areas related to public policies, gender and development, integrity of the judiciary, unpaid care work, gender audit and ageing. She holds a Masters degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics. Co-sponsors: The Harriet Tubman Institute, African Studies, Global Labour Research Centre, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Law and Society (LASO), The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (IFLS),Centre for Feminist Research. ering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique:

Talk by Terezinha da Silva.

Monday, March 20, 2017
Kaneff Tower 519
2:00am – 4:30pm

All are welcome!

The last decade has seen a coal mining boom in northern Mozambique with the arrival of Riversdale, Rio Tinto, Vale and Jindal. The Mozambican government has welcomed these investments as the guarantee of economic growth, jobs and poverty alleviation. Brazil has given strong backing to its corporations in Africa, within an upbeat narrative of South-South solidarity. For the mining communities, it has been a story of unfulfilled promises. There have been forced resettlements of traditional farmers without prior consultation or respect for land rights. Vale has relocated them in a rural area with houses, schools and a health post but no land or means of livelihood. The influx of miners has exacerbated already scarce social and infrastructure in the region, overcrowding roads, schools and hospitals and creating social problems. While there have been many general studies of impacted communities, WLSA’s research project is the first study looking specifically at the impact on women and girls from a gender perspective. The study analyses, in context of resettlements, how women and men produce their responses as a result of mining actions. Terezinha da Silva will talk about the community workshops based on the research and the challenges of taking up these issues in communities with patriarchal traditions still deeply embedded.

Terezinha da Silva (Mozambique) is currently the national coordinator of WLSA Mozambique (Women and Law in Southern Africa), a regional NGO  working on women human’s rights. She is also the board member of different NGO’s working on themes related to community development, social studies, children, gender and women issues and ageing. Her other professional experiences are related to management and institutional development.  She worked for many years at the Ministry of Health and  Social Action.  She also has a wide range of experiences in teaching planning and management, including curriculum development of national courses. Her research experience include areas related to public policies, gender and development, integrity of the judiciary, unpaid care work, gender audit and ageing. She holds a Masters degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics.

Co-sponsors: The Harriet Tubman Institute, African Studies, Global Labour Research Centre, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Law and Society (LASO), The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (IFLS),Centre for Feminist Research.

March 8 LRST/IFLS presents Leslie Griffin: “Institutional or Individual: What is Religious Freedom in the United States Today?”

Prof. Leslie C Griffin (UNLV Law) “Institutional or Individual: What is Religious Freedom in the United States Today?”

All information on poster is in text of post

This paper will argue that the U.S. government has usually interpreted religious freedom to protect institutions and frequently ignored the interests of religious individuals. Interpreting the Free Exercise Clause to protect religious institutions’ rights against their members ignores the experience of the earliest Americans. Allowing the courts to enforce a rule that automatically favors religious institutions over their members is at odds with the early history of liberty of conscience.

This talk will look at two examples of the courts privileging institutions over individuals. First, the ministerial exception allows church employees’ claims against their employers to be dismissed without lawsuit. Second, RFRA (the Religious Freedom Restoration Act) permits religious employers to deny full health insurance coverage to their employees.  The talk then explores the alternative, individual approach to law and religion, which the courts should favor in the future.

Wednesday, March 8, at 12:30-2 at Osgoode Hall law School, in the Faculty Common Room, room 2027.

Prof. Leslie C. Griffin (Boyd School of Law, UNLV) is a constitutional scholar known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion, with a particular focus on the interface of religious liberties, gender, and equality in the United States.  She is the author of numerous articles and book chapters about law, religion, politics and ethics, and her recent works include “A Word of Warning from A Woman: Arbitrary, Categorical, and Hidden Religious Exemptions Threaten LGBT Rights,” 7 Ala. C.R. & C.L.L. Rev. 97 (2015) and “The Catholic Bishops vs. the Contraceptive Mandate,” Religions 2015, 6, 1411–1432, available here. 


March 10th Seminar with Prof. Diamond Ashiagbor

Feminist Friday Seminar March 10th, 2017
Gender, political economy and the construction of the labour market with Professor Diamond Ashiagbor, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies London, UK & Genest Global Faculty Visitor to Osgoode Hall Law School

Date: 10-Mar-2017
Time: 12:30 PM – 02:30 PM
Location: 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School

“Scholarship in the political economy tradition explores how unequal social relations are constructed in specific labour markets. The aim of this seminar is to bring this approach into conversation with the intersectionality literature, to examine the gendered and racialised ways in which inequalities in economic life and in the labour market are structured and experienced. This seminar will examine how women’s social location, for instance in terms of their migration status, race and ethnicity, family status and role in social reproduction, shapes their encounter with the labour market and impacts on the experience of equality law and other legislation as an agent for social change. This requires not only an investigation into intersections between identity categories such as gender and race, and the implications of intersectionality for equality and work. It also necessitates an exploration of other types of ‘intersection’, namely the interaction of employment and equality law with competing normative orders (trade law, human rights law, criminal law, and immigration law) which structure the vulnerability of those who enter a state and operate to deny women’s ability to realise the potentially transformative power of law.

 

Professor Ashiagbor’s research interests have focused on labour/employment law, particularly in the context of regional integration (the European Union and the African Union); trade and development; economic sociology of law; human rights, equality and multiculturalism. Her book The European Employment Strategy: Labour Market Regulation and New Governance (OUP, 2005) won the 2006 Society of Legal Scholars/Peter Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship. She is currently working on ‘Social rights and the market: embedding trade liberalisation in regional labour law’, a research project that is interrogating the social dimension of regional economic integration with sub-Saharan Africa as its focus. 

A full bio is available here: http://ials.sas.ac.uk/about/about-us/people/diamond-ashiagbor
Please RVSP  lunch will be served and materials may be circulated.
www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp Feminist Friday Seminar Gender, political economy and the construction of the labour market with Dr. Diamond Ashiagbor, Institute for Advanced Legal Studies London, UK & Genest Global Faculty Visitor to Osgoode Hall Law School Date: 10-Mar-2017 Time: 12:30 PM - 02:30 PM Location: 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School Dr. Ashiagbor's research interests have focused on labour/employment law, particularly in the context of regional integration (the European Union and the African Union); trade and development; economic sociology of law; human rights, equality and multiculturalism. Her book The European Employment Strategy: Labour Market Regulation and New Governance (OUP, 2005) won the 2006 Society of Legal Scholars/Peter Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship. She is currently working on ‘Social rights and the market: embedding trade liberalisation in regional labour law’, a research project that is interrogating the social dimension of regional economic integration with sub-Saharan Africa as its focus. A full bio is available here: http://ials.sas.ac.uk/about/about-us/people/diamond-ashiagbor (See attached file: DAshiagbor.jpg) Please RVSP lunch will be served and materials may be circulated. www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

Feminist Friday March 3: “Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

The paper is linked below and a brief description provided.

Institute for Feminist Legal Studies Feminist Friday March 3 

1230-230 in Osgoode Hall Law School 2027  RSVP HERE: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

“Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

Vulnerability, Equality & Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law Professor Sheila R. Foster (Fordham Law) Friday March 3 1230-230 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School Ignat Kaneff Building http://bit.ly/RSVPOSGOODESheila R. Foster is University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She is also the faculty co-director of the Fordham Urban Law Center. She served as Vice Dean of the Law School from 2011-2014 and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from 2008-2011. Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on land use, environmental law, and antidiscrimination law. Her early work was dedicated to exploring the intersection of civil rights and environmental law, in a field called “environmental justice.” Her most recent work explores the legal and theoretical frameworks in which urban land use decisions are made. Land use scholars voted her article on Collective Action and the Urban Commons (Notre Dame Law Review, 2011) as one of the 5 best (out of 100) articles on land use published that year. Professor Foster is the recipient of two Ford Foundation grants for her on environmental justice and urban development. Professor Foster is also the coauthor of a recent groundbreaking casebook, Comparative Equality and Antidiscrimination Law: Cases, Codes, Constitutions and Commentary (Foundation Press, 2012). She has taught and conducted research internationally in Switzerland, Italy, France, England, Austria, Colombia, Panama, and Cuba.

In this paper and talk, Prof. Foster suggests that one way to “to better integrate equality norms into environmental decision making — is through the lens of vulnerability. From an equality standpoint, legal theorists have advanced vulnerability as an alternative to the limitations of anti discrimination law and as a more robust conception of the role of the state in protecting vulnerable populations. In the environmental context, social vulnerability analysis and metrics have long been employed to assess and address the ways that some subpopulations are more susceptible to the harms from climate change and environmental hazard events like hurricanes and floods. The use of vulnerability, either as a policy framework or as social science, has not been utilized much in the pollution context to capture the array of factors that shape the susceptibility of certain places and populations to disproportionate environmental hazard exposure. This limitation suggests that a fertile area of research is how to utilize vulnerability metrics in regulatory and legal analysis to better protect these populations and communities.”

All are welcome to join us for this talk.  Lunch will be available, so please do RSVP so that we can ensure sufficient quantity