via Jotwell: Womb as Wedge: What We Can Learn from Revisiting the Political History of the Abortion Controversy in the US

Here’s my post on Jotwell Equality.

[What? You don’t read Jotwell: The Journal of things we like (lots)?]

Womb as Wedge: What We Can Learn from Revisiting the Political History of the Abortion Controversy in the US – Jotwell: Equality.

Linda Greenhouse and Reva Siegel, Before (and After) Roe v. Wade: New Questions about Backlash, 120 Yale L.J. 2028 (2011), available at SSRN.

Sitting in Toronto or maybe Bristol, we have a tendency to watch American politics with both fear and amusement, rather like (or so I hear) some people watch Jersey Shore or Keeping up with the Kardashians: Who are these people? Why do they behave this way?

This is delightfully, smugly, self-satisfying. It is neither analytic nor strategic. And when, inevitably it seems, our relatively open access to abortion (as Carol Sanger has called it, the “luxury of legality”) starts to be challenged, it might leave us rather less than prepared. Greenhouse and Siegel’s article illustrates how a slow burn, not the blast of Roe v. Wade, led to the bitter struggle over reproductive rights in the U.S. today.

continue reading here.

With thanks to my colleague Ben Berger for pushing the article on me, and CUNY’s Ruthann Robson for promo’ing the piece on Constitutional Law Prof Blog.

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