Asides

Laura Beth Nielsen at Yorku Law & Society/ Socio-Legal Studies on October 22

Laura Beth Nielsen at Yorku Law & Society/ Socio-Legal Studies on October 22

“Rights, Reinscription and Racial Inequality”  Monday, October 22nd 2:30-4:00pm S 701 Ross  All Welcome

Rights, Reinscription, and Racial Inequality

This presentation examines how law perpetuates inequalities of race, sex, disability, in different ways in different social locations.  I hope to engage you in thinking about the relationship between rights, law, hierarchy, and legal consciousness in my research which is primarily in the US context in order to introduce you to the theoretical concept I am currently developing that I am calling “Relational Rights.”  All of my research centers on one theoretical question:  Under what conditions can law be harnessed for progressive social change. Specifically, how can law be used to remedy inequalities of unearned privilege like race, sex, sexual orientation, ability, and the like? Using a variety of methods in different organizational, institutional, and legal contexts, I use legal consciousness as a theoretical and methodological framework for my questions. The talk will focus on research about street harassment, employment discrimination, and campus sexual assault.

Laura  Beth Nielsen is a Research Professor at the American Bar Foundation,  Professor of Sociology, & Director of the Center for Legal Studies  at Northwestern University.  She received a PhD in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from UC Berkeley  in 1999 and her law degree also from Berkeley in 1996. She is the author  or editor of 5 books, including  License to Harass: Law, Hierarchy, and Offensive Public Speech, published by Princeton University Press in 2004 which studies racist and sexist street speech, targets’ reactions and responses to it, and attitudes about using law to deal with such speech.  Rights on Trial: How Employment Discrimination Law Perpetuates Inequality (Chicago, 2017) examines  the litigation system of employment civil rights in the United States.   In addition to her scholarly publications in the UCLA Law Review, Law and Society Review, & Law and Social Inquiry, she has participated in Congressional briefings  about federal hate crime legislation and the role of speech in hate  crime. Coverage of her scholarship and her own commentary have appeared  in the New York Times, Time Magazine, the LA Times, FOX News, Morning Edition (NPR), ABC Radio, Al-Jazeera English, the  Huffington Post, USA Today, and the Nation.

 

 

bone picking | ugh twitter, international networks and academic housework

[this post was edited for typos and errors, july 11]

[edited again for NEWS july 12]

ONE:

It is a good thing that Freya talked to me. When I looked, the feed broke down in late 2017, so even the small number of posts I have done haven’t been being pushed out by email via feedburner. Working on this technical problem as we speak and apologies to all the feed based subscribers, who probably aren’t reading this anyway!

so Freya Kodar of UVic law  just stopped me in the LSA2018 lobby and after some pleasant conversation about important and real things, said “I have a bone to pick with you”.   TL;DR, my heart restarted, i should figure out what i’m acting so guilty about, and the bone was just  twitter/communication from IFLS and the shift from blog-delivered-by-email to twitter.

So in the beginning there was a blog, and I was in a place in my life outside of work where sustained things were feeling highly disrupted by family responsibilities including but not limited to small kids.  Putting things on the internet about other people’s work and issues was a way for me to stay connected and au courant when I was worried i would never again be able to do sustained writing.  Then things shifted and twitter arrived and that was more mobile and i would sometimes remember to do roundups of the IFLS twitter feed (which is actually pushed through the IFLS FB page – otherwise not maintained) and clean out the chatter, leaving the links and announcements and things with at least some substance.  Those roundups were produced with Storify, which is no more (https://storify.com/faq-eol).

I know i need a solution for this, because i do think that one of the things IFLS can/should do is highlight new legal feminist scholarship, to share interesting news,  to post items that might otherwise be hard to come by, etc. etc.    So it’s on my list of things to do this summer.   A partial solution (it isn’t really but) is this: if you want to see the IFLS twitter feed, i just opened up my google drive catalogue of the tweets which is a google sheets (google excel) file.  Access open here.  It seems likely that you need to sign in to google to do this which is why it’s not a real solution plus you have to read through a ridiculous amount of tweeting (i started this file to try to make sure i was paying attention to what a time suck twitter was, but it didn’t help).  It’s here.  And thanks Freya, for reminding me that this was something i was “dealing with”! Continue reading bone picking | ugh twitter, international networks and academic housework