Tag Archives: sexuality

Columbia Law's GCSL Now Accepting Applications for Sabbatical Visitors!

Deadline April 15.  Tell your friend to apply if you don’t think it’s your year. What a great opportunity.

The Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia Law School invites applications for Sabbatical Visitors for the 2013-2014 academic year to undertake research, writing and collaboration with Center faculty and students in ways that span traditional academic disciplines. The CGSL welcomes applications from faculty from any field who are interested in spending a semester or the academic year in residence at Columbia Law School working on scholarly projects relating to Gender and/or Sexuality Law.

Sabbatical visitors will receive an office with phone and computer, secretarial support and full access to university libraries, computer systems and recreational facilities. In addition, Sabbatical Visitors will be expected to participate in CGSL activities and present a paper at the Center’s Colloquium Series.

more here: Gender & Sexuality Law Blog » Blog Archive » Now Accepting Applications for Sabbatical Visitors!.

New on SSRN Reva Siegel, Dignity and Sexuality: Claims on Dignity in Transnational Debates Over Abortion and Same-Sex Marriage

Dignity and Sexuality: Claims on Dignity in Transnational Debates Over Abortion and Same-Sex Marriage by Reva Siegel :: SSRN.

abstract:

Dignity’s meaning is famously contested. This essay explores competing claims on dignity in late twentieth-century debates over abortion and in the first decisions on the constitutionality of abortion legislation that these debates prompted. Advocates and judges appealed to dignity to vindicate autonomy, to vindicate equality, and to express respect for the value of life itself. Appeals to these distinct conceptions of dignity are now appearing in debates over the regulation of same-sex relations. Analyzed with attention to competing claims on dignity, we can see that in the debate over same-sex relations, as in the debate over abortion, a crucial question recurs: Do laws that restrict non-procreative sexuality violate or vindicate human dignity? Agonists who hold fundamentally different views about sexuality share an allegiance to dignity, enough to fight for the authority to establish dignity’s meaning in debates over sexual freedom. Today, as in the 1970s, dignity’s meaning is being forged in cross-borders conflict over dignity’s sex.

I am looking forward to reading this and thinking about Canadian jurisprudence which has struggled to define and operationalize “dignity” in a variety of equality rights contexts. See for instance, Denise Reaume, Discrimination & Dignity available on SSRN here.

 

Sexual Orientation and Aging: On the radio/in the journals/doc movies too

The CBC project SHIFT did a piece recently entitled “Back in the Closet”.  The reporters examined unique issues facing LGBT people as they age.  You can listen here.

I see now that Nancy Knauer of Temple University has just posted an article on SSRN entitled “Gen Silent: Advocating for LGBT Elders“.  It is forthcoming in the Journal of Elder Law. Abstract:

This article provides a general introduction to the specific challenges facing LGBT elders. In addition to the general burdens of aging, LGBT elders are disadvantaged by a number of LGBT-specific concerns, most notably: the legal fragility of their support systems, high levels of financial insecurity compounded by ineligibility for spousal benefits, and the continued prevalence of anti-LGBT bias on the part of their non-LGBT peers and service providers. Part I outlines the ways in which LGBT elders differ from their non-LGBT peers in terms of demographics and their reliance on “chosen family,” as well as some of the particular issues confronting transgender elders. Part II turns to two issues that loom large in the lives of LGBT elders: the closet and the constant threat of anti-LGBT bias. It contends that pre-Stonewall history continues to inform the behavior and beliefs of LGBT elders, and that the prevalence of anti-LGBT bias and violence distorts their view of the aging process. Part III discusses the extent to which LGBT elders can use traditional estate planning tools to safeguard their interests. A brief conclusion summarizes the types of reforms that are necessary to ensure dignity and equity in aging regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. It argues that the limitations of existing planning tools should serve as a powerful reminder that many elder law issues require a wider lens and that the reach of elder law ultimately extends well beyond the finer points of estate planning and the spousal impoverishment rules. Aging in the U.S. is first and foremost a civil rights issue that implicates fundamental issues of justices and fairness. In this regard, the isolation and fear experienced by LGBT elders should strike a universal chord, as should their call for dignity and equity in aging.

This isn’t Knauer’s first effort to talk about this issue.  See her faculty bio for links to pdf’s of other articles and the one I mention above.

You could also check out this doc, “A place to live: The story of Triangle Square“.