Tag Archives: sexual violence

Rape’s Long Shadow

The Globe & Mail recently published this article about the long-term consequences of sexual violence, featuring Amanda Dale, Executive Director of Toronto’s Barbra Schlifer Clinic and a fellow Osgoode graduate student.

Picture of Amanda Dale
Amanda Dale

A couple noteworthy points from the article:

  • Social responses to women who disclose sexual violence make a difference.

Research suggests that the reception a woman gets the first time she discloses her attack can shape her experience of trauma. With supportive reception, survivors’ psychological distress can lessen, making them less susceptible to re-victimization. But women who are dismissed when they speak up for the first time often do not talk about it again, a silence that can be extremely detrimental.

  • The current rise in awareness and disclosure needs to be matched by an increase in front-line services.

It’s irresponsible to raise awareness without raising the capacity to receive these stories,” Dale says. “We got 30 calls last week. We don’t want to keep those women waiting for a response. They’re ready. They’re calling.

Also interesting is the continued use of the term “rape” in this and other recent articles, despite the fact that rape was replaced by sexual assault in the Canadian Criminal Code back in 1983. Wondering about the reasons for this (somewhat ineffective) change in wording? See here for a helpful overview.

 

 

Sexual Violence – against men & boys in Conflict Situations (Report from UN Workshop)

Catching up on all the things the profs send for posting – my colleague Sean Rehaag sent this UN Workshop Report from  December 2013 via the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict) to me some weeks ago, sorry for the delay.  Looks very interesting. 

Much important academic work has been done both to deconstruct gender stereotypes and biological essentialisms, and to theorize women’s rights. In the fields of international activism, policy and practice on conflict-related sexual violence, however, the discussion about gender has been blurred with and frequently subsumed into a necessary struggle for women’s rights in the face of historical indifference to the widespread  subordination of women. Notwithstanding the importance of this struggle, the resultant discursive and policy  focus on sexual and gender based violence as a women’s rights issue has become, from a policy and  humanitarian perspective, a serious obstacle to prevention of and response to conflict related sexual and  gender-based violence against men and boys, as practitioners lack both awareness of the issues, and the  appropriate experience and skills with which to respond to male survivors.  The predominance of this paradigm is evident in the fact that in most people’s minds, whether in rural villages  in eastern DRC or in the corridors of power in key donor states, the field of ‘gender’, and the sub-field within  that of SGBV, is understood to be about women. SGBV scenarios are populated by male perpetrators and  female victims. pp8-9

Full report here.  Includes Key resources starting at p 22.  Slides from the July 2013 workshop, here.

Exec Summary here.

November 28 at York: Problematizing international discourses on displacement and sexual violence in Central Africa | Centre for Refugee Studies

Centre for Refugee Studies celebrates 25 years with a keynote address by

Dr. Patricia Daley, Oxford University 

Thursday, November 28th  3:00pm – 5:00pm

Room 519, Kaneff Tower  Yorku 

Problematizing International Discourses on Displacement and Sexual Violence in Central Africa

Dr. Daley’s latest publication is titled “Refugees, idps and Citizenship Rights: the perils of humanitarianism in the African Great Lakes region”. It can be found here.  

Current Research

Her principal research interests are on the intersection between global geo-politics, militarism, masculinities, genocidal violence, humanitarianism and forced migration in East and Central Africa. She is also interested in the dynamics of land tenure, resource extraction and environmental change from a political ecology perspective. Her other projects include an examination of the condition of new African diaspora communities in Great Britain, focusing on issues relating to their spatial distribution, socio-economic status and housing characteristics, and the negotiation of their multiple identities, especially that arising from the experience of trans-racial fostering.  http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/staff/pdaley.html#bio

Other publications include

Daley, P. (2007) Gender and Genocide in Burundi: The Search for Spaces of Peace in the Great Lakes Region, Oxford: James Currey, Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press 

 

Sponsored by:

Office of Dean of LA&PS Office of Dean of FES Office of VP Research & Innovation Centre for Feminist Research Department of Social Science York Centre for International & Strategic Studies Faculty of Graduate Studies School of Gender, Sexuality & WS Development Studies Department of Geography Harriet Tubman Institute Social and Political Thought Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies Graduate Program in Sociology Department of Gender Studies, Queen’s University

Rwanda, Survivors, and Gacaca Courts: Sandra Chu & Dr. Anne-Marie de Brouwer at Intlawgrrls

Sandra Ka Hon Chu, Dr. Anne-Marie de Brouwer and photographer Samer Muscati released The Men Who Killed Me: Rwandan Survivors of Sexual Violence (that link is to the book’s website, much more than just an ordering link) in 2009.  Recently, Sandra and Anne-Marie reinterviewed some of the women and contributed an amazing three part post to the website IntlawGrrls. Part 1 is here, part 2 here and part 3 is here.  Recommended, if difficult, reading about legal processes in post-conflict societies.

Sandra is an Osgoode LLM grad who works as a Sr. policy analyst at the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network.  You can read more about Sandra and Anne-Marie here.