Tag Archives: reproduction

via Impact Ethics – Commentary by Rachael Johnstone: Privileging Infertility over Abortion in New Brunswick

whath/t Sanda Rodgers for this very interesting piece by Dr. Rachael Johnstone.

Privileging Infertility over Abortion in New Brunswick at Impact Ethics blog

If it were part of a larger commitment to create a spectrum of women’s reproductive health services, the infertility fund could be laudable. However, when contrasted with the government’s long held, paternalistic stance against the creation of substantive access to abortion, it suggests more alarming commitments. Validating the desires of women to have children by investing money in expensive (often unsuccessful) treatments, while simultaneously denying the rights of those facing unwanted pregnancies by failing to provide relatively minimal financial support, suggests deeply troubling views of women’s reproductive rights. If pregnancy is the only reproductive choice the government supports, what happens to women who do not want to reproduce, or are unable or unwilling to support a child? What do these policies say about the value of women’s contributions to the community? Moreover, without clear policy guidelines to protect the health of women who undergo infertility treatment, what message is the government sending about the importance of women’s health?

 

today Prof. Joanna Erdman, MacBain Chair at Dalhousie Law – "New Ideas in an Age-Old Field": Regulating Reproduction [room change]

2027

“New Ideas in an Age-Old Field”: Regulating Reproduction
Professor Joanna Erdman
MacBain Chair in Health Law & Policy, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University

Thursday October 25, 1230-2pm

Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2003 now in 2027 Faculty Lounge
Light Lunch Served, please RSVP to lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

Poster for emailing, printing, sharing, here.

 

suggested reading:

Reva Siegel, “The Constitutionalization of Abortion” in M. Rosenfeld & A. Sajó eds., The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law 1057-78 (2012).

 

Marie Ashe, “Zig-Zag Stitching and the Seamless Web: Thoughts on ‘Reproduction’ and the Law,” (1989) 13 Nova L. Rev. 355  (this is a hein online link and will require access to hein, e.g. through the York library system)


IFLS presents Prof. Joanna Erdman on October 25: "New Ideas in an Age-Old Field": Regulating Reproduction

“New Ideas in an Age-Old Field”: Regulating Reproduction
Professor Joanna Erdman
MacBain Chair in Health Law & Policy, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University

Thursday October 25, 1230-2pm

Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2003
Light Lunch Served, please RSVP to lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

Poster for emailing, printing, sharing, here.

 

suggested reading:

Reva Siegel, “The Constitutionalization of Abortion” in M. Rosenfeld & A. Sajó eds., The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law 1057-78 (2012).

 

Marie Ashe, “Zig-Zag Stitching and the Seamless Web: Thoughts on ‘Reproduction’ and the Law,” (1989) 13 Nova L. Rev. 355  (this is a hein online link and will require access to hein, e.g. through the York library system)


The Transformation of Pregnancy: Murray on Sanger at Jotwell

Fascinating Jotwell review of Carol Sanger’s article “The Birth of Death”: Stillborn Birth Certificates and the Problem for Law”  by Melissa Murray in Jotwell’s brand new Family Law section (Janet Halley and Melissa Murray, eds), here.

In order to understand the nature of the loss, Sanger explains, one must understand the transformation of pregnancy and childbirth in our culture. Medical technology has “permanently altered our relationship to the fetus.” In particular, obstetric sonography “has made fetuses present” in the lives of their families “in ways that once were possible only after the baby was born.” This process, which Sanger terms “social birth,” now precedes biological birth. And it is the fact of social birth that makes stillbirth—and the standard legal response to it—so confounding to grieving parents. A fetal death certificate seems to many parents of stillborn children “an offensive and bureaucratic response to their circumstances and suffering.” It denies for many the basic fact that there was a pregnancy, labor, and the delivery of an actual baby, rather than a fetus. In short, it is a clinical response that fails to capture the complexity of the parent-child relationship in utero, and in failing to grasp the nature of this relationship, compounds the parents’ grief.

…..

Importantly, Sanger’s critique of the promise and perils of public recognition has implications that extend beyond the narrow context of stillbirth and fetal loss.  For example, scholars of marriage and sexuality have frequently noted the degree to which legal recognition turns on exclusivity—for recognition to mean something, there must be an other that goes unrecognized.

via A Hug From the State: Recognizing Stillbirths – Jotwell: Family Law.

new in print (March 2011) Reproducing Race : Khiara M. Bridges

Read Chapter 1 here and get hooked.

Reproducing Race : Khiara M. Bridges

Reproducing Race, an ethnography of pregnancy and birth at a large New York City public hospital, explores the role of race in the medical setting. Khiara M. Bridges investigates how race—commonly seen as biological in the medical world—is socially constructed among women dependent on the public healthcare system for prenatal care and childbirth. Bridges argues that race carries powerful material consequences for these women even when it is not explicitly named, showing how they are marginalized by the practices and assumptions of the clinic staff. Deftly weaving ethnographic evidence into broader discussions of Medicaid and racial disparities in infant and maternal mortality, Bridges shines new light on the politics of healthcare for the poor, demonstrating how the “medicalization” of social problems reproduces racial stereotypes and governs the bodies of poor women of color.

Khiara M. Bridges is Associate Professor of Law and Associate Professor of Anthropology at Boston University.  Her bio is as interesting as the book:

Interests: critical race theory; criminal law

Khiara M. Bridges joins the BU faculty from the Center for Reproductive Rights, where she enjoyed an academic fellowship that was co-hosted and co-sponsored by Columbia Law School. She has written many articles on race and women’s experiences of reproduction, and she is the author of Reproducing Race: An Ethnography of Pregnancy as a Site of Racialization, to be published by the University of California Press. Her scholarship has appeared in the Columbia Law Review, the California Law Review, and the Texas Journal of Women & Law, among others.

She graduated as valedictorian from Spelman College, from where she received her degree in three years. She received her J.D. from Columbia Law School and her Ph.D., with distinction, from Columbia University’s Department of Anthropology. While in law school, she was a teaching assistant for the former dean, David Leebron (Torts), as well as for the late E. Allan Farnsworth (Contracts). She was a member of the Columbia Law Review and a Kent Scholar. While in college, she was a counselor at the Feminist Women’s Health Center in Atlanta, gaining experience with policies affecting the availability of abortion services in Georgia. She has also been a reporter for the Miami Herald, speaks fluent Spanish and basic Arabic, and is a classically trained ballet dancer who continues to perform professionally in New York City. Professor Bridges teaches Critical Race Theory and Criminal Law at BU Law.