Tag Archives: privilege

Nancy Leong on cyber harassment, & etc.

A few weeks ago I tweeted a link to Prof. Nancy Leong‘s (Denver Sturm Law – her SSRN page here) series about about harassment in cyberspace (at Feminist Law Professors, here), definitely  worth a read.  As part of her reflections on anonymity, identity, and how to understand the responsibility of thread starters, website administrators, etc, she describes her own experience:

Over the course of about fifteen months, this particular harasser commented about me approximately 70 times on at least five different websites, frequently remarking on my physical appearance.  ….. Moreover, he wrote offensive profiles of a dozen other law professors who were–so far as I could tell, with one exception–all women or people of color or both. (from part 4, here)

The ABA site writes about the ethics complaint that Leong eventually filed, here, as does well known law blogger Brian Leiter here (and elsewhere).   Leiter noted Leong’s Feminist Law Professors posts back in November, in this post, where he also references work by Law Prof Mary Anne Franks (Miami) on this subject, and a few days ago he noted that Amanda Hess has written an article in the Pacific Standard:  The Next Civil Rights Issue: Why Women Aren’t Welcome on the Internet –  which references work by Franks and Danielle Citron (Maryland).

The connection between the generalised misogyny of the internet,  and the very specific targeting of particular women is interesting both in terms of understanding why and how they happen, and in terms of how both affect the behaviour of those who are neither harassers nor targets, but are in the same spaces as those who are filling those roles. I highly recommend a look at Leong’s Feminist Law Professors posts – both for those who are at home on the net and those still resisting. Leong’s work also has the advantage, in my view, of bringing an intersectional view to the question of harassment.

In Canada, I have seen a variety of work which looks at cyberbullying or related topics from law school scholars like Jane Bailey (Ottawa) (and the eGirls project researchers as a group, see the website for this SSRHC funded project here), Karen Eltis (Ottawa), A. Wayne MacKay (Dalhousie), and I’m sure many more – if anyone has an up to date bibliography on this issue I would be happy to post it.

 

If you want to read more by Leong, try this article, The Open Road and the Traffic Stop: Narratives and Counter-Narratives of the American Dream,64 Fla. L. Rev. 305 (2012) here

This review of that article, which takes on interesting questions about conceptual inquiry and its place in educating law students, and this, by Ruthann Robson pointing to another blog post by Stephen Diamond.

Boyd: "Marriage is More than Just a Piece of Paper: Feminist Critiques of Same Sex Marriage"

This article reviews feminist critiques of same sex marriage and analyzes how marriage as a ocio-legal institution relates to inequality based on factors such as sex, race and class. The article first identifies how the legalization of same sex marriage can be viewed as a positive step in the quest for equality and recognition of lesbians and gay men. It then describes the legal and statistical trends in relation to marriage in Canada, as one of the first countries to legalize same sex marriage. The heart of the article discusses the key feminist critiques of both marriage and same sex marriage, drawing on an international survey of primarily English language literature. It considers why these critiques have been understated in the debates on same sex marriage and reviews empirical studies on the views of lesbians and gay men on marriage. While acknowledging that legal marriage can offer important rights to some couples, the conclusion suggests alternatives to placing marriage at the center of the lesbian and gay movement for equality and recognition.

via Marriage is More than Just a Piece of Paper: Feminist Critiques of Same Sex Marriage by Susan B. Boyd :: SSRN.