Tag Archives: feminists@law

Vol 4 of {openaccess} Feminists@Law Journal is out…

Vol 4, No 1 2014 Cover Art by Hannah Tiernan on Feminists@Law websitewith fabulous Table of Contents. Come on – you don’t really want to keep grading, do you?  Feminists@law’s all online format means that they can publish “multimedia” work, that is, talks and similar items – see the last section of the ToC.

Vol 4, No 1 2014.

 

Introduction: Gendering Labour Law  Judy Fudge, Emily Grabham

This special section of feminists@law is the outcome of a workshop, called ‘Gendering Labour Law’, held at Kent Law School on June 20 and 21, 2013. The workshop marked the first collaborative effort of participants in the nascent Gender Labour Law Research Network (GLLRN), which is being launched simultaneously with the publication of this collection. The GLLRN, the workshop and this special section emerge from a collaboration between Emily Grabham and Judy Fudge, supported by the Leverhulme Trust and Kent Law School, which is designed to cultivate feminist and critical labour law scholarship and research.

Preface  Ann Stewart

Legal Constructions of Body Work Ann Stewart

Abject Labours, Informal Markets: Revisiting the Law’s (Re)Producti

on Boundary

Prabha Kotiswaran

Research Note: Bingo and Feminist Political Economy Kate Bedford

Research Note: Rethinking Feminist Engagements with the State and Wage Labour Donatella Alessandrini

Unpaid Care, Paid Work and Austerity: A Research Note Nicole Busby

The Strange Temporalities of Work-Life Balance Law Emily Grabham

Gender and the Idea of Labour Law Joanne Conaghan

Labour, Value and Precarity in the Age of Austerity: Measuring Labour and Rethinking Value Lisa Adkins (audio)

BDS as a Feminist Issue

It Is Our Belief That Palestine is a Feminist Issue…

David Lloyd

Palestinian Feminist Critique and the Physics of Power: Feminists Between Thought and Practice

Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

Bodies, Buses and Permits: Palestinians Navigating Care

Rana Sharif

Some Reflections on BDS and Feminist Political Solidarity

Brenna Bhandar

Comments

Feminism Then and Now   Camille Kumar, with an Introduction by Sarah Keenan

Multimedia

Black and White: History of Racial Identity in Italy

Gaia Giuliani

The Contribution of Feminism to Contemporary Public Debates About Law

Nicola Barker, Sinead Ring, Maria Drakopoulou, Rosemary Hunter

The Policing and Prosecution of Rape: What Do We Know and How Should Our Knowledge Shape Policy and Practice?

Betsy Stanko, with Louise Ellison, Martin Hewitt and Harriet Wistrich

via feminists@law: Contribution of Feminism to 3 Contemporary Debates About Law

Nicola Barker speaks on ‘Feminism, Family and the Politics of Austerity’ (with accompanying powerpoint slides); Sinead Ring speaks on ‘The Pernicious Nature of Rape Myths and How They Continue to Affect Rape Prosecutions’; Maria Drakopoulou speaks on ‘Feminism, Tradition and the Question of Sexual Violence’; and Rosemary Hunter acts as discussant, commenting on all three papers.

check it out in audio & ppt at feminists@law.

Women Workers: Is Equality Enough? Judy Fudge in feminists@law

Former Osgoode professor, now Landsdowne Chair in Law at UVic Law and presently a Leverhulme Visiting Professor at Kent Law, Judy Fudge recently gave an open lecture as part of her visit.  Feminists@law has the text in their most recent (open access!) issue, here.  Judy has an important body of work mainly in the area of employment and labour law.  See her faculty bio here.

The article delivers an interesting and important message about changing times and goals, arguing that equality as “equality between the genders” is inadequate in the context of an increasingly fragmented labour market.  Etc!  Enjoy:

Women’s claims to equality in employment have become more nuanced and complex as the contours of the gender order have been redrawn to reflect the growing diversity between women and a deterioration in what has been the normative or standard employment relationship for men. Using Canada and the United Kingdom to illustrate the changes in the labour market and gender order, the lecture calls into question the potential of equality norms, however expansive, to solve the problems women workers face in the wake of global austerity.

via Women Workers: Is Equality Enough? | Fudge | feminists@law.

feminists@law Vol 2, No 2 (2012) now available: open access, the person-property problematic

 

awesome Stacy Douglas artwork

feminists@law has a new issue out, here.   This version of the open access feminist legal journal housed at Kent includes an Editorial: Why We Oppose Gold Open Access in which Rosemary Hunter, Donatella Alessandrini, Toni Williams take on the recommendation of the UK Working Group on Expanding Access to Published Research Findings,Accessibility, Sustainability, Excellence: How to Expand Access to Research Publications (the Finch Report) (June 2012):

The Report focuses on the publication of articles in peer reviewed journals. It recommends a move to open access publishing in order to make the results of research undertaken in the UK more widely available to academic researchers, public sector and industry research users, and the general public.  The model of open access publishing it advocates is so-called ‘Gold Open Access’, involving the payment of an article processing/publishing charge (APC) by authors.

The issue also includes “Persons, Property and Community” by Margaret Davies (Flinders).  Here’s the abstract:

The terms ‘persons’ and ‘property’, and the connections between them, have been analysed very thoroughly in several disciplines, including law, philosophy, cultural studies, and anthropology. Like many technical terms, the legal concepts of persons and property are embedded in social practice and reflect its gendered discourse and practices. There is often cross-fertilisation of ‘legal’ and ‘everyday’ or social meanings, as well as a certain productive tension between them. This article introduces and reviews the person-property problematic, and considers how the discourse surrounding these terms and their relationship is changing under increased pressures from a more community-focused (and less individualistic) ethos, influenced in part by feminist thinking about relationality. The article is divided into three parts. First, I introduce some of the difficulties with the concepts of persons and property, and consider what they refer to, and how they are used. Second, I explain what I see as the relationship between these two ideas – how they are supposed to be diametrically opposed, and how they are in fact inextricably linked. Up to this point the article essentially draws pertinent points from a mountainous literature on the topic. The third and more substantial part of the paper takes the matter in a new direction. Here I try to capture new ways of thinking about property which in some ways loosen the property-person nexus, without breaking it altogether. In essence, these new approaches introduce values associated with the community, the environment, and our material futures into our thinking.