Tag Archives: equality

CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION (co sponsored with Hennick Centre) Feb 14 2019

Hennick Centre for Business and Law  Institute for Feminist Legal Studies present you with a small Valentine:

CARLOS A. BALL

The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION

February 14 2019 1230-2PM  |  IKB 2027 (Osgoode Hall Law School)  Lunch Served

RSVP here

Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press’s LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law.

Hennick Centre for Business and Law | Institute for Feminist Legal Studies CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICA CORPORATION February 14 2019 1230-2PM IKB 2027 Lunch Served | RSVP bit.ly/qthecorp Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press's LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law. In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as "The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally" (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality. Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people. Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as “The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally” (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality.  Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people.

 

 

Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

 

 

Version 2 of How to Be a Better Chair of an Academic Panel

For those who liked the original “How to be a better Chair of an academic panel” handout, here’s version 2, enriched via crowdsourcing.  New thoughts about keeping time (we’ve got signs for you, download here) some science (“calling on a woman to ask the first question will increase the number of women who ask questions: Carter, Croft, Lukas & Sandstrom, Women’s visibility in academic seminars: women ask fewer questions than men. Available at http://bit.ly/2JQfhiw”) and a gentle reminder that you don’t have to call on people in order, nor do you have to let the first person with their hand up ask the first question.

Get it and share it in DOCX Format   PDF Format

Thanks to all of you who chimed in via twitter and other modes!  And to those of you who wondered why we don’t take on the whole organization of academic conferences, we agree there is space for someone out there to do a “Just have a better CONFERENCE” tipsheet.  We’re looking forward to it.

page 1 of document as photo, available in PDF and DOCX form in this post.

Feminist Friday March 3: “Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

The paper is linked below and a brief description provided.

Institute for Feminist Legal Studies Feminist Friday March 3 

1230-230 in Osgoode Hall Law School 2027  RSVP HERE: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

“Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

Vulnerability, Equality & Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law Professor Sheila R. Foster (Fordham Law) Friday March 3 1230-230 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School Ignat Kaneff Building http://bit.ly/RSVPOSGOODESheila R. Foster is University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She is also the faculty co-director of the Fordham Urban Law Center. She served as Vice Dean of the Law School from 2011-2014 and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from 2008-2011. Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on land use, environmental law, and antidiscrimination law. Her early work was dedicated to exploring the intersection of civil rights and environmental law, in a field called “environmental justice.” Her most recent work explores the legal and theoretical frameworks in which urban land use decisions are made. Land use scholars voted her article on Collective Action and the Urban Commons (Notre Dame Law Review, 2011) as one of the 5 best (out of 100) articles on land use published that year. Professor Foster is the recipient of two Ford Foundation grants for her on environmental justice and urban development. Professor Foster is also the coauthor of a recent groundbreaking casebook, Comparative Equality and Antidiscrimination Law: Cases, Codes, Constitutions and Commentary (Foundation Press, 2012). She has taught and conducted research internationally in Switzerland, Italy, France, England, Austria, Colombia, Panama, and Cuba.

In this paper and talk, Prof. Foster suggests that one way to “to better integrate equality norms into environmental decision making — is through the lens of vulnerability. From an equality standpoint, legal theorists have advanced vulnerability as an alternative to the limitations of anti discrimination law and as a more robust conception of the role of the state in protecting vulnerable populations. In the environmental context, social vulnerability analysis and metrics have long been employed to assess and address the ways that some subpopulations are more susceptible to the harms from climate change and environmental hazard events like hurricanes and floods. The use of vulnerability, either as a policy framework or as social science, has not been utilized much in the pollution context to capture the array of factors that shape the susceptibility of certain places and populations to disproportionate environmental hazard exposure. This limitation suggests that a fertile area of research is how to utilize vulnerability metrics in regulatory and legal analysis to better protect these populations and communities.”

All are welcome to join us for this talk.  Lunch will be available, so please do RSVP so that we can ensure sufficient quantity

 

This is how you build a movement: CAMWL invites us to go Beyond the Niqab

The Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law has had a lot to respond to of late.  Here’s their most recent – a list of 8 actions we can take to support women’s equality.  Follow them on twitter at @camwlnews.

Do you think it’s unacceptable to deny women citizenship because of what they wear? Do you think the endless debates about women’s clothing are a distraction from the real issues we should be talking about this election season and every day? If you answered yes, you are part of a large, strong, and diverse community […]

Source: Beyond the Niqab: 8 Ways You Can Improve Women’s Equality in Canada – Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law

We can do more than just voting.

Incidentally, can I call attention to the way that CAMWL put in #4 and #6

4. Condemn police racial profiling, which disproportionately targets Black and other racialized communities in Canada.

6. Demand Canada investigate and end the crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, of whom there are thousands, to say nothing of the countless Indigenous people killed and scarred by residential schools, disproportionate incarceration, and systemic dispossession.

and nehiyaw educator Tasha Spillett‘s article for CBC the other week?

When I heard the words “barbaric cultural practices” fall from the mouth of Conservative candidate Kellie Leitch late last week, I instinctively wanted to pick up the phone. Not to report on practices at variance with this narrow conception of “Canadian values,” but because I felt a searing urgency to check-in with my sisters.

….

That said, it wasn’t the women from my own indigenous community that drew my concern following Leitch’s election broadcast. It was, instead, a grave worry for the well-being of my Muslim sisters, their families and their communities.

There are more of these moments. They build and break my heart, to see communities reaching out to each other despite their own tough times, to see these connections recognized and forged.   This is how we will build our movement.