Tag Archives: Amar Bhatia

Prof. Adelle Blackett @ IFLS: Author and Readers of “Everyday Transgressions”: Friday March 20, 1230-230 NEW TIME

Join us on the eve of the International Day for the Elimination of Racism to talk about “the story behind the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Decent Work for Domestic Workers Convention No. 189, and its accompanying Recommendation No. 201 which in 2011 created the first comprehensive international standards to extend fundamental protections and rights to the millions of domestic workers laboring in other peoples’ homes throughout the world“. In this accessible and fascinating book, Prof. Blackett ( Canada Research Chair in Transnational Labour Law and Development at McGill Law) ” [a]s the principal legal architect…takes us behind the scene to show us how Convention No. 189 transgresses the everyday law of the household workplace to embrace domestic worker’s human rights claim to be workers like any other – and like no other. ” Other academic guest commentators including including Professors Amar Bhatia, Michele Johnson, Jennifer Nedelsky, Kerry Rittich, Adrian Smith, Ethel Tungohan & Leah Vosko. This event is co-sponsored by the Global Labour Research Centre at York.

Friday March 20, 2020 **NEW TIME** 1230PM 230 IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge). Refreshments will be served. Space is limited, so please register to avoid disappointment: bit.ly/BlackettMarch20.

This Institute for Feminist Legal Studies event graciously co sponsored by the Global Labour Research Centre at York.

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EVERYDAY TRANSGRESSIONS: DOMESTIC WORKERS’ TRANSNATIONAL CHALLENGE TO INTERNATIONAL LABOR LAW (Cornell 2019). Copies will be available for purchase.

[bio from McGill Law]: Adelle Blackett, Ad. E., is Professor of Law and Canada Research Chair in Transnational Labour Law and Development at the Faculty of Law, McGill University, where she teaches and researches in the areas of labour and employment law, trade regulation, law and development, critical race theory and slavery and the law. Professor Blackett holds a B.A. in History from Queen’s University, civil law and common law degrees from McGill, and an LL.M. and a doctorate in law from Columbia University. Widely published in English, French and Spanish in the emerging field of transnational labour law, in 2015, she co-edited a Research Handbook on Transnational Labour Law. Her book manuscript entitled Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers’ Transnational Challenge to International Labour Law (Cornell University Press) was published in Spring 2019.

Professor Blackett is the recipient of prestigious research fellowships, notably the Social Science and Humanities Research Council’s Bora Laskin National Fellowship in Human Rights Research in 2010, and the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellowship in 2016 on transnational futures of international labour law, for which she organized an eponymous course in winter 2019.

She was a William Dawson Scholar at McGill from 2007 to 2016, and has been a visiting scholar at the African Development Bank, the Australian National University and SOAS (University of London). She founded and directs the Labour Law and Development Research Laboratory (LLDRL) at McGill, was a founding steering committee member of the international Labour Law Research Network (LLRN), and is member of the Quebec based Inter-University Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT).

A former official of the International Labour Office in Geneva, Professor Blackett has been an ILO expert on international standard setting on decent work for domestic workers (2008-2011) leading to the adoption of ILO Convention No. 189 and Recommendation No. 201; and in a labour law reform process in Haiti (2011-2014). In 2009, she was unanimously appointed by the National Assembly of Quebec to the province’s Human rights and youth rights Commission, where she served as a commissioner for seven (7) years.

A member of the Law Society of Upper Canada and the Barreau du Québec, she was awarded the latter’s Christine Tourigny Award of Merit and the status of advocate emeritus in 2014, in recognition of her social commitment and her contributions to the advancement of women. She received a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.  In 2015, the Canadian Association of Black Lawyers awarded her its Pathfinder Award for her significant contributions to the legal community and the community at large.

In November 2018, Adelle Blackett was appointed to the Human Rights Expert Panel of the Government of Canada’s renewed Court Challenges Program. She was appointed to the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) Chapter 23 (Trade and Labour) Roster of experts in December 2018. Professor Blackett was elected an associate member of the International Academy of Comparative Law in July 2019.

Osgoode Catalyst Fellowship: enhancing the diversity of the profession. Deadline December 13

Please circulate to likely candidates and appropriate list serves.  Osgoode has had the privilege of hosting two great Fellows in the early years of this Fellowship (Amar Bhatia, Pooja Parmar) and we look forward to many more.

 

Osgoode Catalyst Fellowship 

[link at http://www.osgoode.yorku.ca/faculty/osgoode-catalyst-fellowship-application-process ]

The Osgoode Catalyst Fellowship program will serve as a bridge to a legal academic career for one or more scholars each academic year.

The Osgoode Catalyst Fellowships are designed to bring to Osgoode emerging scholars who have a demonstrated interest in a career in law teaching, and to support and mentor scholars who will enhance the diversity of the profession. Fellows will be given the opportunity to present a faculty seminar with the aim of preparing a major article for publication, to pursue an active affiliation with one of our research centers, and to teach a course at the Law School.

Promising candidates should commit to being in residence at the Law School for a full academic year. Fellowships may also be awarded for a semester. Fellows will receive approximately $50,000 in funding for a full academic year.

Fellows should not be degree candidates at Osgoode Hall Law School or any other school during the term of the fellowship.

Osgoode Hall Law School is committed to equality and diversity. We especially welcome applications from women, visible minorities, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, and LGBT candidates. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply, and we encourage candidates to self-identify in their initial applications.

Interested individuals should send an application that includes a curriculum vitae, copies of law and graduate transcripts, a detailed statement of a research project, and three signed confidential letters of academic reference to be received as soon as possible, and in any event no later than, Friday December 13, 2013 to:

Nicole Salama
Secretary of the Faculty Recruitment Committee
Osgoode Hall Law School
York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON  M3J 1P3
e-mail: facultyrecruitment@osgoode.yorku.ca
tel: (416) 650-8283

Please note that electronic applications are strongly preferred, and hard copies will not be returned.