Category Archives: Upcoming IFLS Events

Berks Conference on Women's History & some Women's History (Hart House)

If you missed the first run, you can catch Not Behaving like Ladies: An Anecdotal History of Women’s Participation at Hart House
when it returns during the Sixteenth Berkshire Conference on the History of Women being held at U of T this May.

This program for this enormous undertaking is available here.  Have a look at Friday night May 23rd…

630PM to 8PM Reception

hosted by the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies and the Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History 

U of T Faculty Club, Front Lounge 

and then, Saturday May 24th morning at 1030, come and join me for this powerhouse panel:

Cutting Edge Contributions and Critical Reflections in Canadian Feminist Legal History

ROUNDTABLE (#1002), Hart House East Common Room
Co-sponsored by the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies and the Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
Chair: Sonia Lawrence, York University

“The Power of Gender, Race, Disability, and Class in Canadian Legal History.” Constance Backhouse, University of Ottawa

“Gender and Professionalization Projects: Rethinking Stories of Early Women Lawyers.” Mary Jane Mossman, York University

“From Collective Genealogy to the Intersections of Law and Individuals’ Family Histories.” Bettina Bradbury, York University

“Not Taking a Break from Feminism: Reflections on Criminal Law on the Aboriginal Plains.” Shelley Gavigan, York University

 

 

The panel is being held in Hart House – appealing for a variety of reasons.   Before or after the panel, you can check out Not Behaving Like Ladies – “a group of interviews with twenty-four women who influenced, challenged or participated in Hart House over the past several decades. In 1972, Hart House admitted women as full members, and while the border may have been officially breached on that date, the process of infiltration began much earlier and the impact of women at Hart House continues. To this day, Hart House remains a place where transformations can and do happen in response to the changing nature of our culture, society, and country. This project was conceived as a way to commemorate the stories of women’s participation at Hart House in their own words.”

h/t Mary Jane Mossman on the exhibit  at Hart House, and many thanks to Profs Franca Iacovetta (the main organizer of this Big Berks) and Angela Fernandes (legal historian at U of T law) of U of T for their support of this panel.

 

There are so many interesting panels – here are a few which might appeal – you can search for times/locations at the Berks program here (this link is to the prelim program) using Ctrl F)

Saturday morning in the first timeslot

Indigenous Women and Mobilization: Idle No More, Before and Beyond
PANEL (#1009), UC A101

Kim Anderson, Wilfrid Laurier.

Chair and Commentator: Winona Wheeler, University of Saskatchewan.

Pamela Palmater , Ryerson University.

Hazel Hill, Haudenosaunee Development Institute.

Tanya Kappo, Lawyer and Activist

 

 

 

Events on Campus at York: Lesbian Pulp Fiction, Olivia Chow, Sex & Gender & Sport, Komagata Maru

Thursday, March 6, 2014 “Perverted Justice: (Homo)Sexuality and Female Juvenile Delinquency in U.S. Popular Culture, 1920-1940”  Anastasia Jones

11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.  Vari Hall 2183

Event Poster JOIN YORK UNIVERSITY AS WE CELEBRATE this document is available in alternate format upon request INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2014 inspiring change MP, TRINITY - SPADINA KEYNOTE SPEAKER olivia chow FEATURED SPEAKERS Laureen Waters ABORIGINAL ELDER Welcome Remarks Rhonda Lenton VICE-PRESIDENT ACADEMIC AND PROVOST Chairperson Enakshi Dua ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, SCHOOL OF GENDER SEXUALITY & WOMEN’S STUDIES "Through a political career spanning three decades, Olivia Chow has been one of Toronto`s most passionate and effective advocates – on the School Board, at Toronto City Hall, in Parliament, and on the national stage." DATE Thursday, March 6, 2014 TIME 12:30pm - 2:30pm VENUE Senate Chambers, 940N Ross Building, 4700 Keele St., York University SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION MCLAUGHLIN COLLEGE CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE CENTRE FOR REFUGEE STUDIES YORK CENTRE FOR PUBLIC POLICY AND LAW THE EVENT IS CO-SPONSORED BY JOIN THE CONVERSATION! Copies of her new book “My Journey” will be available! REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED! To RSVP please contact Lorraine Myrie at 416-736-2100 x 33825 or lmyrie@yorku.ca.

Anastasia Jones is a Toronto-based historian who earned her B.A. at Concordia in 2006 and her Ph.D. at Yale in 2013. In 2009, she designed a web exhibition on lesbian pulp fiction for the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale. In 2010 she was a recipient of the John Money Fellowship for Scholars of Sexology at the Kinsey Institute in Bloomington, Indiana. Her 2013 dissertation is titled “‘She’s Like That’: Female Same-Sex Intimacy and the G

rowth of Modern Sexual Categories in the U.S., 1920-1940.” She is currently working with the Ontario Heritage Trust and the Berkshire Conference on Women’s History.  This event is cosponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research; the Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist, and Women’s Studies; the Graduate Program in History; the History Department (LAPS); and the School of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies.  Contact:  Marc Stein Professor of History and Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies mrstein@yorku.ca


 

Thursday, March 6, 2014   INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY 2014 Inspiring Change

12:30pm – 2:30pm  Senate Chambers, 940n Ross Building York University

Keynote Speaker Olivia Chow, MP, Trinity – Spadina

Featured Speakers Laureen Waters, Aboriginal Elder

Welcome Remarks Rhonda Lenton Vice-President Academic and  Provost

Chair Enakshi Dua Associate Professor, School Of Gender Sexuality & Women’s Studies

Through a political career spanning three decades, Olivia Chow has been one of Toronto`s most passionate and effective advocates – on the School Board, at Toronto City Hall, in Parliament, and on the National stage.  Join the Conversation!  Copies of Olivia’s New Book “My Journey” Will Be Available Refreshments Will Be Served  To RSVP please contact Lorraine Myrie at 416-736-2100 x 33825 or lmyrie@yorku.ca


Monday, 10 March 2014 12:30 until 14:20  The Policing of Sex and Gender in Professional Sport. Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, Room 1002

The division of athletes along gender lines often goes unquestioned. But what are we losing in keeping things this way? What does it mean to police those with supposedly ambiguous gender identities?  Come

and hear our experienced panelists explore the policing of gender in the Olympics and in professional sports in general. They will explore its history, prevalence and problems, as well as the possibilities for a more inclusive environment for athletes who don’t fit traditional gender binaries.

Event Poster: The Policing of Sex and Gender in Professional Support.  Monday, 10 March 2014 12:30 until 14:20  Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, Room 1002 Description The division of athletes along gender lines often goes unquestioned. But what are we losing in keeping things this way? What does it mean to police those with supposedly ambiguous gender identities?  Come and hear our experienced panelists explore the policing of gender in the Olympics and in professional sports in general. They will explore its history, prevalence and problems, as well as the possibilities for a more inclusive environment for athletes who don't fit traditional gender binaries.  Panelists: Dr. Bruce Kidd, Professor of Kinesiology at U of T  Kristen Worley, Advocate and Elite Athlete Erin Durant, Civil Litigator at Dooley Lucenti Barrister and Solicitors   Refreshments Provided  Hosted by the Osgoode Feminist Collective and Osgoode Entertainment Sports Law Association

 

Panelists: Dr. Bruce Kidd, Professor of Kinesiology at U of T  Kristen Worley, Advocate and Elite Athlete Erin Durant, Civil Litigator at Dooley Lucenti Barrister and Solicitors

Refreshments Provided

Hosted by the Osgoode Feminist Collective and Osgoode Entertainment Sports Law Association

 


 

Tuesday, March 11, 2014 GETTING TO WE: THE KOMAGATA MARU, THE UNMAKING OF EMPIRE AND THE MAKING OF A SETTLER SOCIETY  12:00 pm — 2:00 pm / Osgoode Hall Law School

Please RSVP to guarantee entry

University of Toronto Professor Audrey Macklin explores the 1914 Komagata Maru Episode as a transformative moment in the evolution of Canadian citizenship. As part of Komagata Maru Week, P

rofessor Macklin will deliver a lecture that situates the Komagata Maru Episode in the national and imperial context of the early 20th Century, as well as identifies traces of the episode in present-day Canada.  Canadian citizenship did not formally emerge until 1947 — the same year as India achieved independence. Until then, all inhabitants of the British Empire shared a common status

as British subjects. The British proclaimed that all British subjects were equal, and free mobility throughout the Empire was one manifestation of that equality. The vehemence with which Canadian officials sought to exclude the Indian passengers aboard the Komagata Maru belied their alleged equality as British subjects, yet the means by which the exclusion was accomplished also demonstrated the need to conceal the government’s motive behind an apparently neutral regulation.  That the Canadian government formally apologized for the Komagata Maru Episode suggests that the impact and meaning of the event is safely sequestered in the past. However, the moral panic surrounding the arrival of people on boats, the transnational security discourse, the racialization of Canadian citizenship, the reliance on low-visibility, highly discretionary tools, and easily manipulated tools for regulating migration, remain significant features of contemporary Canadian migration law, policy and discourse. The event is free and open to all.

 

 

[Friday January 24] After Bedford v. Canada: What next for regulating sex work in Canada?

Poster_PrintI’m* going to moderate this panel, which takes on some very difficult issues in the wake of an important Supreme Court decision.

After Bedford v. Canada: What next for regulating sex work in Canada?
Come and hear an array of panelists discuss the new legal landscape and the challenges that now face us after the Supreme Court struck down many – but not all – of Canada’s criminal laws about sex work.
What happens when legal doctrine tries to address street realities? Six experts offer different visions of the road ahead.

  • Cheryl Auger Board Member, Maggie’s: The Toronto Sex Worker Action Project
  • Christa Big Canoe Legal Advocacy Director, Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto
  • Jamie Cameron Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School
  • Brenda Cossman Professor & Director, Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies
  • Katrina Pacey Legal Director, Pivot Legal Society
  • Kim Pate Executive Director, Canadian Association of Elizabeth Fry Societies

Friday, January 24, 2014
3:30 – 5:30 p.m.
University College, Room 179
15 King’s College Circle, University of Toronto

 

Generously supported by the Scotiabank University of Toronto Faculty of Law Lecture and Conference Fund and the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University,
and co-sponsored by the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies and the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

PDF poster here with map.

 

* sonia lawrence, ifls director

Dean Penny Andrews at Osgoode: on New Strategies for Pursuing Women's Human Rights

Feb3PAPosterDean Penelope Andrews (Albany) will be at Osgoode Monday February 3, 2014,  and will speak from her latest book, From Capetown to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights (Ashgate) 1230-230 in room 2027.  Please RSVP to Lielle Gonsalves, lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

The author examines and compares gender inequality in societies undergoing political, economic and legal transformation, and looks at two countries – South Africa and Afghanistan – in particular. These two societies serve as counterpoints through which the book engages, in a nuanced and novel way, with the many broader issues that flow from the attempts in newly democratic societies to give effect to the promise of gender equality. Developing the idea of ‘conditional interdependence’, the book suggests a new approach based on the communitarian values which underpin newly democratic societies and would allow women’s rights to gain momentum and reap greater benefits. [from the publisher]

Ruthann Robson reviewed the book for Jotwell, here.

More about Dean Andrews from the Albany website, here:

Dean Andrews, who was born and raised in South Africa, has extensive international experience, including teaching at law schools in Germany, Australia, Holland, Scotland, Canada and South Africa. An annual award in her name—The Penelope E. Andrews Human Rights Award—was inaugurated in 2005 at the South African law school of University of KwaZulu-Natal. Along with numerous other awards, she holds a “Women of South Africa Achievement Award,” as well as Albany Law’s Kate Stoneman Award, which she received in 2002.

In 2005 she was a finalist for a vacancy on the Constitutional Court of South Africa, the highest court in South Africa on constitutional matters. She has consulted for the United Nations Development Fund for Women, and for the Ford Foundation in Johannesburg, where she evaluated labor law programs. She earned her B.A. and LL.B from the University of Natal, Durban, South Africa, and her LL.M from Columbia University School of Law, New York.

She has published extensively on topics centered on gender and racial equality, South African legal issues, Australian legal issues, and international justice.

Dean Andrews will also be speaking to Professor Dayna Scott’s International Environmental Law class on Monday afternoon on the right to water in South African (constitutional) law.

 

Community, connections, commitment: Conversations at Osgoode

 

This semester we are bringing some of the people who do front line work with gender issues in Toronto to Osgoode.   Join us for these discussions about work, careers, challenges and choices (each with one lawyer and one “non lawyer”) – we will leave plenty of time for your questions.  Tuesday Jan 21 and Tues Feb 4, 1230-230.

Tuesday January 21 1230-230 in 2027

Farrah Khan & Deepa Mattoo

Hear Deepa Mattoo (staff lawyer at South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario) & Farrah Khan (counselor at the Barbra Schlifer Clinic for women who have experienced violence, artist, and educator) talk about their work with women in the GTA’s South Asian communities, advocacy inside and outside the community, research, media strategies, and negotiating complicated spaces between xenophobic racism and community silencing. How did these women find their way to exciting and meaningful careers? What sustains them in their work? Come & find out.

pdf poster here: KhanMattoo21jan

 

KhanMattoo21jan

 

 

Tuesday February 4th 1230-230 in 2027, join IFLS

Tamar Witelson & Joanna Hayes

Legal Director Tamar Witelson & Legal Information Coordinator Joanna Hayes work for one of Toronto’s most dynamic and community engaged agencies. METRAC is a non-profit committed to the rights of women and children to live their lives free of violence and the threat of violence. They will discuss the work METRAC does, how they work together, their career paths, and what working in the not-for-profit sector is like.

PDF poster here:  METRAC4thFeb

 

METRAC4thFeb