Category Archives: Upcoming IFLS Events

Aziza Ahmed at Osgoode Thurs November 14 |FEMINISM’S MEDICINE: Risk, Race, Gender, and Law in the AIDS Epidemic

Poster for the Department of Health and Human Services demonstration designed by ACT UP/DC Women’s Committee, 1990. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/survivingandthriving/img/photo-exhibition-OB2224.jpg

THURSDAY 14 November 2019 1230PM Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge)

Lunch Served

How did the world come to see women as “at risk” for HIV? How did a disease of men come to kill women? Against a linear narrative of scientific discovery and progress, Feminism’s Medicine argues that it was women’s rights lawyers and activists that fundamentally altered the legal and scientific response to the epidemic by changing core conceptions of who was at risk of contracting HIV.  In other words, feminists not only changed the legal governance of AIDS, they altered the scientific trajectory of the epidemic.  In doing so, they moved resources towards women in the epidemic.  Feminists advocated for women to be seen as a risk group for HIV in multiple locations: in U.S. administrative agencies, courthouses across the country, as well as in global governance institutions. The talk will consider the impact of a diverse range of feminisms for its impact on scientific ideas, legal reform agendas, and the distributional consequences of feminist engagement in the AIDS epidemic. 

Aziza Ahmed is Associate Professor of Law at Northeastern School of Law. She is an expert in health law, human rights, property law, international law, and development. Her interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on issues of both domestic and international law. Join the IFLS for this talk.

A few recent or forthcoming publications from Professor Ahmed

  • Handbook on Race, Racism, and the Law (Edward Elgar Publishing, forthcoming) (with Guy-Uriel Charles).
  • Gender Violence (forthcoming) (with Donna Coker, Leigh Goodmark, and Deborah Weisman).
  • “Forensic Science in Self-Induced Abortion Prosecutions,” Boston University Law Review (forthcoming 2019)
  • “Health and Human Rights: Harm-Reduction and the Fight to Decriminalize Public Health Services,” American Society of International Law Proceedings (forthcoming 2019). 
  • “Race and Assisted Reproduction: Implications for Public Health,” 86 Fordham Law Review 2811 (2018). 

Professor Vasuki Nesiah “Is gender sensitive transitional justice the feminism we were aiming for?” October 18 2019 at Osgoode

“TELL ALL THE TRUTH BUT TELL IT SLANT”
Is gender sensitive transitional justice the feminism we were aiming for?

Professor Vasuki Nesiah, Gallatin School NYU

FRIDAY OCTOBER 18 2019
1230-2PM
FACULTY LOUNGE | IKB 2027
OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL

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co presented with Law Arts Culture .

“From Rigobertu Menchu to Anne Frank, the testimonials of women and girls are often seen to have particular authority in ‘speaking truth to power’ and bearing witness to vulnerable communities’ experience of genocidal violence and their fortitude in resistance. Feminist celebration of ‘narrative truth’ has rendered truth commissions a particularly important site of feminist engagement.

At the same time, feminist analysis of the politics of knowledge and their mobilization in the commission of truth has drawn attention to the fraught stakes of categories such as victimhood, voice and injury. This talk will engage in the debate by thinking with Paulina in Ariel Dorfman’s play, Death and the Maiden.

Davina Cooper @ IFLS | The Future of Legal Gender

Thursday September 19 2019  1230-2

Osgoode Hall Law School   IKB ROOM 2027

THE FUTURE OF LEGAL GENDER

Professor Davina Cooper, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College

all text in poster is available in the post.

Are there good reasons to retain a system in which people have a formal legal sex/ gender? What might change involve? And what are the challenges, risks and benefits of radical reform? This talk draws on a British, feminist, law reform research project, currently in its second year, to explore these questions. It approaches decertification, where the state no longer stands behind people’s sex/gender, from two primary angles: the politics of moving from gender-as-identity to gender-as-network (or something similar); and the politics of prefiguring what the law (and its options) could be.

If you would like to learn more about the research project this talk draws on? See here for the project website, and/or read this fascinating blog post from one of the Researchers, Dr. Flora Renz. It is up at the UK Socio Legal Studies Association blog.

Fluctuating intensities: Thinking about gender through other socio-legal categories

” Part of the challenge of a prefigurative law reform project, is to think through what such options would look like. If we want to imagine and anticipate different ways of dealing with gender as a legal status, one useful starting point may be to think about how other identity statuses or categories are currently dealt with in social, policy and legal contexts. Disability as a category may offer a particularly rich source both for comparison, but also to think about how future changes to gender could be approached from a different starting point. In thinking through these issues I am using disability or chronic illness not as a direct comparison but rather as a prompt for considering some aspects of gender that are less prominent in current discussions, such as gender as a legal category whose intensity and relevance may fluctuate in different times and places.”

March 8 : Mosher & Koshan, Domestic Violence before the Canadian Courts: Intersections, impacts, identities

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE THE CANADIAN COURTS: INTERSECTIONS, IMPACTS, IDENTITIES Date: 8-Mar-2019 Time: 01:30 PM - 03:30 PM Location: Room 2027, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building Link: RSVP JENNIFER KOSHAN (CALGARY LAW) & JANET MOSHER (OSGOODE) "Domestic violence cases present unique access to justice issues, especially when litigants are required to navigate multiple legal systems. In Canada, parties affected by domestic violence may face legal issues encompassing numerous laws, including criminal, family, child protection, civil protection, housing, social assistance, immigration and refugee laws, each of which has its own legal processes. This presentation will explore the extent to which law/policy makers and judges take account of the difficulties and dangers that may arise for these parties when laws and legal systems intersect. Our initial findings indicate that state actors often ignore these intersections or proceed on problematic assumptions about them; they fail to attend to the complexities presented by litigants’ identities, such as their Indigeneity and immigration status; and they tend to minimize the impact of domestic violence on women and children, thereby jeopardizing safety and impeding access to justice DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE THE CANADIAN COURTS: INTERSECTIONS, IMPACTS, IDENTITIES

Friday 8-Mar-2019 Time: 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM Room 2027,  Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building
RSVP

JENNIFER KOSHAN (CALGARY LAW) & JANET MOSHER (OSGOODE)

Domestic violence cases present unique access to justice issues, especially when litigants are required to navigate multiple legal systems. In Canada, parties affected by domestic violence may face legal issues encompassing numerous laws, including criminal, family, child protection, civil protection, housing, social assistance, immigration and refugee laws, each of which has its own legal processes.

This presentation will  explore the extent to which law/policy makers and judges take account of the difficulties and dangers that may arise for these parties when laws and legal systems intersect. Our initial findings indicate that state actors often ignore these intersections or proceed on problematic assumptions about them; they fail to attend to the complexities presented by litigants’ identities, such as their Indigeneity and immigration status; and they tend to minimize the impact of domestic violence on women and children, thereby jeopardizing safety and impeding access to justice

 

 

Feb 13 12-3 Gowlings Hall, photos for Law Needs Feminism Because…2019 ed.

The Osgoode Feminist Collective, in collaboration with the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, is pleased to announce this year’s #LawNeedsFeminismBecause campaign. LNFB is a photo campaign held at law schools across Canada meant to facilitate dialogue on issues relating to gender, diversity and inclusivity in law schools, the legal profession and the justice system. If you’re not familiar with the campaign, please visit https://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/mission/

A few notes about participating:
– Please come prepared with a caption for your photo
– Please refrain from defining “law” or “feminism” in your captions
– If your caption contains a quote, please include its source
– Your photos will turn out best if you wear clothing in solid, neutral tones

Inclusivity, accessibility, and diversity are pillars of LNFB’s campaign. Please stay in tune with these principles.

Please note that all participants will be asked to sign a release so that their photos can be included in the national campaign. Releases will be available at the table in Gowlings, but for those who are able it would be helpful if you brought signed releases with you. Click here to print/sign.  

On behalf of OFC and IFLS, we hope to see you there!

 

Photos from national campaign website:

 

U calgary

 

U de Sherbrooke

U vic