Category Archives: Upcoming IFLS Events

Prof. Adelle Blackett @ IFLS: Author and Readers of “Everyday Transgressions”: Friday March 20, 1230-230 NEW TIME

Join us on the eve of the International Day for the Elimination of Racism to talk about “the story behind the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) Decent Work for Domestic Workers Convention No. 189, and its accompanying Recommendation No. 201 which in 2011 created the first comprehensive international standards to extend fundamental protections and rights to the millions of domestic workers laboring in other peoples’ homes throughout the world“. In this accessible and fascinating book, Prof. Blackett ( Canada Research Chair in Transnational Labour Law and Development at McGill Law) ” [a]s the principal legal architect…takes us behind the scene to show us how Convention No. 189 transgresses the everyday law of the household workplace to embrace domestic worker’s human rights claim to be workers like any other – and like no other. ” Other academic guest commentators including including Professors Amar Bhatia, Michele Johnson, Jennifer Nedelsky, Kerry Rittich, Adrian Smith, Ethel Tungohan & Leah Vosko. This event is co-sponsored by the Global Labour Research Centre at York.

Friday March 20, 2020 **NEW TIME** 1230PM 230 IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge). Refreshments will be served. Space is limited, so please register to avoid disappointment: bit.ly/BlackettMarch20.

This Institute for Feminist Legal Studies event graciously co sponsored by the Global Labour Research Centre at York.

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EVERYDAY TRANSGRESSIONS: DOMESTIC WORKERS’ TRANSNATIONAL CHALLENGE TO INTERNATIONAL LABOR LAW (Cornell 2019). Copies will be available for purchase.

[bio from McGill Law]: Adelle Blackett, Ad. E., is Professor of Law and Canada Research Chair in Transnational Labour Law and Development at the Faculty of Law, McGill University, where she teaches and researches in the areas of labour and employment law, trade regulation, law and development, critical race theory and slavery and the law. Professor Blackett holds a B.A. in History from Queen’s University, civil law and common law degrees from McGill, and an LL.M. and a doctorate in law from Columbia University. Widely published in English, French and Spanish in the emerging field of transnational labour law, in 2015, she co-edited a Research Handbook on Transnational Labour Law. Her book manuscript entitled Everyday Transgressions: Domestic Workers’ Transnational Challenge to International Labour Law (Cornell University Press) was published in Spring 2019.

Professor Blackett is the recipient of prestigious research fellowships, notably the Social Science and Humanities Research Council’s Bora Laskin National Fellowship in Human Rights Research in 2010, and the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellowship in 2016 on transnational futures of international labour law, for which she organized an eponymous course in winter 2019.

She was a William Dawson Scholar at McGill from 2007 to 2016, and has been a visiting scholar at the African Development Bank, the Australian National University and SOAS (University of London). She founded and directs the Labour Law and Development Research Laboratory (LLDRL) at McGill, was a founding steering committee member of the international Labour Law Research Network (LLRN), and is member of the Quebec based Inter-University Research Centre on Globalization and Work (CRIMT).

A former official of the International Labour Office in Geneva, Professor Blackett has been an ILO expert on international standard setting on decent work for domestic workers (2008-2011) leading to the adoption of ILO Convention No. 189 and Recommendation No. 201; and in a labour law reform process in Haiti (2011-2014). In 2009, she was unanimously appointed by the National Assembly of Quebec to the province’s Human rights and youth rights Commission, where she served as a commissioner for seven (7) years.

A member of the Law Society of Upper Canada and the Barreau du Québec, she was awarded the latter’s Christine Tourigny Award of Merit and the status of advocate emeritus in 2014, in recognition of her social commitment and her contributions to the advancement of women. She received a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.  In 2015, the Canadian Association of Black Lawyers awarded her its Pathfinder Award for her significant contributions to the legal community and the community at large.

In November 2018, Adelle Blackett was appointed to the Human Rights Expert Panel of the Government of Canada’s renewed Court Challenges Program. She was appointed to the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) Chapter 23 (Trade and Labour) Roster of experts in December 2018. Professor Blackett was elected an associate member of the International Academy of Comparative Law in July 2019.

Indigenous Law, Gender and Land: Friday January 17 at Osgoode

INDIGENOUS LAW, GENDER & LAND with Dr. Heidi Stark | Dr. Cheryl Suzack | Dr. Deborah McGregor

Friday January 17, 2020 1230-230

ATTENTION: ROOM CHANGE TO Helliwell Centre, Osgoode Hall Law School ROOM 1014

Lunch Served. Please RSVP for Space/Food Purposes bit.ly/ILGLJan17

Panellists:

Dr. Heidi Stark, UVic Political Science

Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) received her Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, in 2008. Her doctoral research focused on Anishinaabe treaty-making with the United States and Canada and serves as the foundation for her manuscript Unsettled: Anishinaabe Treaty-Relations and U.S./Canada State-Formation (In progress, University of Minnesota Press, First Peoples Series).

Her primary area of research and teaching is in the field of Indigenous Comparative Politics, Native Diplomacy & Treaty and Aboriginal Rights. She is the co-editor of Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World Through Stories with Jill Doerfler and Niigaanwewidam Sinclair (Michigan State University Press, 2013) and is the co-author of the third edition of American Indian Politics and the American Political System (2010) with Dr. David E. Wilkins.

Professor Cheryl Suzack, U of T English

Cheryl Suzack’s research focuses on Indigenous law and literature with a particular emphasis on writing by Indigenous women. In her book, Indigenous Women’s Writing and the Cultural Study of Law, she explores how Indigenous women’s writing from Canada and the United States addresses case law concerning tribal membership, intergenerational residential school experiences, and land claims. Her current project analyzes Justice Thurgood Marshall’s papers in the context of Indian civil rights claims from the 1960s. She is a co-editor (with Greig Henderson and Simon Stern) of “The Critical Work of Law and Literature,” University of Toronto Quarterly (Fall 2013) and a co-editor and contributor (with Shari Huhndorf, Jeanne Perreault, and Jean Barman) to the award-winning collection, Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture (UBC 2010). Suzack is cross-appointed to the Aboriginal Studies Program and teaches courses for English and Aboriginal Studies on comparative Indigenous literatures, comparative Indigenous studies, and Indigenous decolonization with a focus on gender issues and Indigenous women.

Professor Deborah McGregor (Osgoode)

Professor Deborah McGregor joined York University’s Osgoode Hall law faculty in 2015 as a cross-appointee with the Faculty of Environmental Studies. Professor McGregor’s research has focused on Indigenous knowledge systems and their various applications in diverse contexts including water and environmental governance, environmental justice, forest policy and management, and sustainable development. Her research has been published in a variety of national and international journals and she has delivered numerous public and academic presentations relating to Indigenous knowledge systems, governance and sustainability. She co-edited Indigenous Peoples and Autonomy: Insights for a Global Age with Mario Blaser, Ravi De Costa and William Coleman (2010). She is co-editor (with Alan Corbiere, Mary Ann Corbiere and Crystal Migwans) of the Anishinaabewin conference proceedings series.

Professor McGregor, who is Anishinaabe from Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island, Ontario, is the Primary Investigator on two current SSHRC-funded projects: Indigenous Environmental (In)Justice: theory and practice and Indigenizing the First Nations Land Management Regime.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Professor McGregor was an associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto and served as Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives and the Aboriginal Studies program. She has also served as Senior Policy Advisor, Aboriginal Relations at Environment Canada-Ontario Region. In addition to such posts, Professor McGregor remains actively involved in a variety of Indigenous communities, serving as an advisor and continuing to engage in community-based research and initiatives.

Professor McGregor coordinated an Indigenous Environmental Justice (IEJ) Symposium in May 2016 featuring the voices of women and youth. She also recently launched an IEJ website.

Co sponsors: Osgoode Intensive Program in Indigenous Lands, Resources & Governments; Osgoode Environmental Justice Clinic; Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies

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Prof. Abbye Atkinson (Berkeley) @ IFLS: “Debt by another name ” on Monday February 3 1230

Monday February 3, 2020 1230-2PM IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge)

event poster - all text is in the post. Includes author photograph

Lunch Served. RSVP bit.ly/DebtFeb3

DEBT BY ANOTHER NAME

ABBYE ATKINSON Berkeley Law, University of California

The US Congress’ reliance on “credit” as a tool of liberation and equality following the Civil Rights and Women’s Right Movements of the 1960’s and 1970’s suggests that Congress viewed credit as a reliable and viable social good.

This valorization of credit, however, explicitly excluded any meaningful consideration of the countervailing force of debt.  Given that debt necessarily accompanies credit as extended and then used, in order for credit to be a social good, debt also has to be a reliable and viable social good. 

Yet debt has itself functioned as a mechanism of the very subordination in marginalized communities that Congress’ invocation of “credit” hoped to address. Credit cannot, in fact, meaningfully function as a social good without due attention to and solution for the work of debt as a social ill.

Professor Abbye Atkinson’s research focuses on the law of debtors and creditors as it affects economically disenfranchised communities. Her work examines how certain legal institutions—such as consumer bankruptcy—that were created with a purpose of improving economic health do not attend to and may actually exacerbate existing inequalities experienced by economically disenfranchised groups. Her recent work has explored structural inequality in the Bankruptcy Code, and whether and how bankruptcy law might serve as a back-stop against debt that results from social problems such as intractable mortgage discrimination and policing for profit. Her work is forthcoming in the Stanford Law Review and has been published in the Vanderbilt Law Review, the Arizona Law Review, and the Michigan Journal of Race and Law.

Before joining Berkeley Law, Atkinson was a Thomas C. Grey Fellow and Lecturer in Law at Stanford Law School and the Reginald F. Lewis Fellow at Harvard Law School.  Previously she worked as an associate attorney in the San Francisco office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, and she served as a law clerk to the Honorable Ronald M. Gould of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for the Honorable Marilyn Hall Patel of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. She graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School and earned her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to attending law school, she worked as a special education teacher in California public schools. 

Prof. Bethany Hastie @ Osgoode: Workplace Sexual Harassment: Assessing the Effectiveness of Human Rights Law in Canada | Thursday JANUARY 23 230PM

poster for event. all information available in the text of the post.

Prof Hastie’s recently published report analyzes substantive decisions on the merits concerning workplace sexual harassment at each of the BC and Ontario Human Rights Tribunals from 2000-2018, with a view to identifying how the law of sexual harassment is understood, interpreted and applied by the Tribunals’ adjudicators. In particular, this report examines whether, and to what extent, gender-based stereotypes and myths known to occur in criminal justice proceedings arise in the human rights context.

Prof Hastie’s talk will be followed by brief commentary from Professor Janet Mosher and Osgoode McMurtry Fellow Fathima Cader.

23-Jan-2020
2:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Room 2028, Osgoode Hall Law School
Refreshments served, PLEASE RSVP!

Aziza Ahmed at Osgoode Thurs November 14 |FEMINISM’S MEDICINE: Risk, Race, Gender, and Law in the AIDS Epidemic

Poster for the Department of Health and Human Services demonstration designed by ACT UP/DC Women’s Committee, 1990. https://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/survivingandthriving/img/photo-exhibition-OB2224.jpg

THURSDAY 14 November 2019 1230PM Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2027 (Faculty Lounge)

Lunch Served

How did the world come to see women as “at risk” for HIV? How did a disease of men come to kill women? Against a linear narrative of scientific discovery and progress, Feminism’s Medicine argues that it was women’s rights lawyers and activists that fundamentally altered the legal and scientific response to the epidemic by changing core conceptions of who was at risk of contracting HIV.  In other words, feminists not only changed the legal governance of AIDS, they altered the scientific trajectory of the epidemic.  In doing so, they moved resources towards women in the epidemic.  Feminists advocated for women to be seen as a risk group for HIV in multiple locations: in U.S. administrative agencies, courthouses across the country, as well as in global governance institutions. The talk will consider the impact of a diverse range of feminisms for its impact on scientific ideas, legal reform agendas, and the distributional consequences of feminist engagement in the AIDS epidemic. 

Aziza Ahmed is Associate Professor of Law at Northeastern School of Law. She is an expert in health law, human rights, property law, international law, and development. Her interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on issues of both domestic and international law. Join the IFLS for this talk.

A few recent or forthcoming publications from Professor Ahmed

  • Handbook on Race, Racism, and the Law (Edward Elgar Publishing, forthcoming) (with Guy-Uriel Charles).
  • Gender Violence (forthcoming) (with Donna Coker, Leigh Goodmark, and Deborah Weisman).
  • “Forensic Science in Self-Induced Abortion Prosecutions,” Boston University Law Review (forthcoming 2019)
  • “Health and Human Rights: Harm-Reduction and the Fight to Decriminalize Public Health Services,” American Society of International Law Proceedings (forthcoming 2019). 
  • “Race and Assisted Reproduction: Implications for Public Health,” 86 Fordham Law Review 2811 (2018).