Category Archives: What we’re thinking/reading/doing (IFLS blog)

What’s interesting these days?

Davina Cooper @ IFLS | The Future of Legal Gender

Thursday September 19 2019  1230-2

Osgoode Hall Law School   IKB ROOM 2027

THE FUTURE OF LEGAL GENDER

Professor Davina Cooper, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College

all text in poster is available in the post.

Are there good reasons to retain a system in which people have a formal legal sex/ gender? What might change involve? And what are the challenges, risks and benefits of radical reform? This talk draws on a British, feminist, law reform research project, currently in its second year, to explore these questions. It approaches decertification, where the state no longer stands behind people’s sex/gender, from two primary angles: the politics of moving from gender-as-identity to gender-as-network (or something similar); and the politics of prefiguring what the law (and its options) could be.

If you would like to learn more about the research project this talk draws on? See here for the project website, and/or read this fascinating blog post from one of the Researchers, Dr. Flora Renz. It is up at the UK Socio Legal Studies Association blog.

Fluctuating intensities: Thinking about gender through other socio-legal categories

” Part of the challenge of a prefigurative law reform project, is to think through what such options would look like. If we want to imagine and anticipate different ways of dealing with gender as a legal status, one useful starting point may be to think about how other identity statuses or categories are currently dealt with in social, policy and legal contexts. Disability as a category may offer a particularly rich source both for comparison, but also to think about how future changes to gender could be approached from a different starting point. In thinking through these issues I am using disability or chronic illness not as a direct comparison but rather as a prompt for considering some aspects of gender that are less prominent in current discussions, such as gender as a legal category whose intensity and relevance may fluctuate in different times and places.”

Review of US Feminist Tax Judgments Project at Jotwell

Find the full “jot” by Kim Brooks here

Bridget J. Crawford &  Anthony C. Infanti, Feminist Judgments: Rewritten Tax Opinions (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017).
"I want to draw attention to two features in this short review. These features are not tied, given this more general audience, to the tax context of the decisions. That’s worth underlining: this is a volume that is worth reading for scholars in any area of law with an interest in feminist legal theory and practice and how feminists approach legal and factual questions."

March 8 : Mosher & Koshan, Domestic Violence before the Canadian Courts: Intersections, impacts, identities

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE THE CANADIAN COURTS: INTERSECTIONS, IMPACTS, IDENTITIES Date: 8-Mar-2019 Time: 01:30 PM - 03:30 PM Location: Room 2027, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building Link: RSVP JENNIFER KOSHAN (CALGARY LAW) & JANET MOSHER (OSGOODE) "Domestic violence cases present unique access to justice issues, especially when litigants are required to navigate multiple legal systems. In Canada, parties affected by domestic violence may face legal issues encompassing numerous laws, including criminal, family, child protection, civil protection, housing, social assistance, immigration and refugee laws, each of which has its own legal processes. This presentation will explore the extent to which law/policy makers and judges take account of the difficulties and dangers that may arise for these parties when laws and legal systems intersect. Our initial findings indicate that state actors often ignore these intersections or proceed on problematic assumptions about them; they fail to attend to the complexities presented by litigants’ identities, such as their Indigeneity and immigration status; and they tend to minimize the impact of domestic violence on women and children, thereby jeopardizing safety and impeding access to justice DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE THE CANADIAN COURTS: INTERSECTIONS, IMPACTS, IDENTITIES

Friday 8-Mar-2019 Time: 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM Room 2027,  Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building
RSVP

JENNIFER KOSHAN (CALGARY LAW) & JANET MOSHER (OSGOODE)

Domestic violence cases present unique access to justice issues, especially when litigants are required to navigate multiple legal systems. In Canada, parties affected by domestic violence may face legal issues encompassing numerous laws, including criminal, family, child protection, civil protection, housing, social assistance, immigration and refugee laws, each of which has its own legal processes.

This presentation will  explore the extent to which law/policy makers and judges take account of the difficulties and dangers that may arise for these parties when laws and legal systems intersect. Our initial findings indicate that state actors often ignore these intersections or proceed on problematic assumptions about them; they fail to attend to the complexities presented by litigants’ identities, such as their Indigeneity and immigration status; and they tend to minimize the impact of domestic violence on women and children, thereby jeopardizing safety and impeding access to justice

 

 

Feb 13 12-3 Gowlings Hall, photos for Law Needs Feminism Because…2019 ed.

The Osgoode Feminist Collective, in collaboration with the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, is pleased to announce this year’s #LawNeedsFeminismBecause campaign. LNFB is a photo campaign held at law schools across Canada meant to facilitate dialogue on issues relating to gender, diversity and inclusivity in law schools, the legal profession and the justice system. If you’re not familiar with the campaign, please visit https://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/mission/

A few notes about participating:
– Please come prepared with a caption for your photo
– Please refrain from defining “law” or “feminism” in your captions
– If your caption contains a quote, please include its source
– Your photos will turn out best if you wear clothing in solid, neutral tones

Inclusivity, accessibility, and diversity are pillars of LNFB’s campaign. Please stay in tune with these principles.

Please note that all participants will be asked to sign a release so that their photos can be included in the national campaign. Releases will be available at the table in Gowlings, but for those who are able it would be helpful if you brought signed releases with you. Click here to print/sign.  

On behalf of OFC and IFLS, we hope to see you there!

 

Photos from national campaign website:

 

U calgary

 

U de Sherbrooke

U vic