Category Archives: What we’re thinking/reading/doing (IFLS blog)

What’s interesting these days?

(from Feminist Law Prof) 1L Stories Revisited

Feminist Law Prof 1L Stories Revisited |Feminist Law Professors.

Prof. Bridget Crawford  previews a recent issue of the University of Missouri-Kansas City Law Review on the theme “One L Revisited” – looks like a good read, with Adrienne K. Wing, Scott Turow (!!) and Ian Ayres.

This issue isn’t up on Hein online yet, but if you want to, you can have Hein email you when the UMKC collection is updated (this alert system is currently in beta, but looks interesting).  Try: http://heinonline.org/HOL/Index?index=journals/umkc&collection=journals

Here’s the table of contents:

LAW STORIES: ONE L REVISITED (Summer 2010)

Introduction: One L: The View in the Mirror by Scott Turow

Two Pink Lines by Melissa N. Anderson

Theodicy by Ian Ayres

The Infinite Alchemy: A First Year Journey in Three Acts Spanning Three Decades by Pamela Bridgewater

Classroom Storytelling by Alafair S. Burke

Last Reunion by Stephen L. Carter

One-L-ow Brick Road by Hala V. Furst

Neurotic, Paranoid Wimps—Nothing Has Changed by Andrew Jay McClurg (get it from SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1622884)

One L in a Different Voice: Becoming a Gay Male Feminist at Harvard Law School by Marc R. Poirier

Contested Meanings: Achievement and Ambition at an Elite Law School by Deborah Waire Post

How You Gonna’ Keep Her Down on the Farm . . . by Lisa R. Pruitt (http://ssrn.com/abstract=1540877)

Take Two by Saira Rao

I ♥ Crits by Cameron Stracher

Tales from the Back Bench by Robert R.M. Verchick

One L Redux by Adrien Katherine Wing

2008 Critical Perspectives on Environment and Women’s Health Workshop Co sponsored by IFLS and National Network on Environments and Women's Health

Supported by the National Network on Environment and Women’s Health (NNEWH), a Center of Excellence located at York University, this interdisciplinary workshop sought to engage with contemporary ideas around environmental health and justice.

“As feminists, activists and scholars we are committed to a social determinants of health model, which allows for an analysis of the complex ways in which environments produce and reproduce the conditions that create disparities in health. We are interested in exploring and deconstructing conceptions of nature, motherhood, ecologies and health as articulated within mainstream environmental discourses.

“We are seeking to overcome the tendency towards fragmentation of social movements, and to foster environmental justice organizing that takes account of gender, sexuality, race, citizenship and dis/ability in a way that is inclusive and that meaningfully accounts for difference.

Participant List

ANNE BLOOM Associate Professor of Law at the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law

PASCALE FOURNIER Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa and an associate at the university’s Human Rights Research and Education Centre (HRREC)

LOCHLANN JAIN

Assistant Professor of Cultural and Social Anthropology at Stanford University.

ARYN MARTIN Assistant Professor at the Department of Sociology and Program in Science & Technology Studies at York University.

STU MARVEL (Osgoode PhD candidate)

ROXANNE MYKITIUK Associate Professor of Law at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

DAYNA NADINE SCOTT Assistant Professor Osgoode Hall, cross-appointed with the Faculty of Environmental Studies

RACHEL STEIN professor of English and director of Women’s and Multicultural Studies at Siena College in New York.

NOËL STURGEON Chair and Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Graduate Faculty in American Studies at Washington State University

CHERYL TEELUCKSINGH Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology at Ryerson University

This workshop inspired an article recently published by Prof. Dayna Scott (Osgoode) a co director of the NNEWH

Gender Benders: Sex and Law in the constitution of polluted bodies.  Feminist Legal Studies (2009) 17: 241

Springerlink to article (requires authorized access)

“Success itself is Masculinized”: She-Lawyers and Other Improbable Creatures

Patricia Williams writing in The Nation:   She-Lawyers and Other Improbable Creatures

Patricia J. Williams uses Elena Kagan’s confirmation as the context for a discussion of the ways that cognition, language and culture are barriers to equality.  Worth reading, for the analysis and for Williams’ always deft touch with language.  Why does Kagan seem to be having an easier time than Sotomayor? Is it just the absence of a smoking “Wise Latina”? Or is it the way that Kagan is being treated not as a successful woman, but a successful “man”?

This chatter isn’t really about Kagan’s sexual preference as much as it is about whether she exhibits masculine traits. ….She likes poker! She swings a softball bat! Not only does anything she touches suddenly get characterized as a male pursuit; she is amply endowed with a Midas touch of testosterone. Success itself is masculinized.

The “Beautiful” Game?

Well, if your team got knocked out in South Africa, you can always hold on till next year’s women’s world cup is played in Germany.

Although I wonder what FIFA’s up to sometimes.

The official slogan is “The Beautiful Side of 20Eleven” (referencing the 11 player team in soccer, of course).

Everyone should be involved in 2011, when the best women’s [sic] players in the world celebrate the world’s favourite pastime in a typically feminine manner: Elegant, dynamic, technically adept, agile and informal… in short, beautiful.”

(from http://www.fifa.com/womensworldcup/organisation/slogan/index.html)

Now that is some clever semantic work! And you can easily find the obligatory article on Eye-Catching Girls Enhance Allure – on the official FIFA website.

Having

(a) just supervised an LLM in which Osgoode student Katharine Neufeld (along with being an excellent writer and harpist, Katharine is now working as the Legal Information Coordinator at METRAC) explored women’s hockey and the “feminine apologetic”, and

(b) just read Margot (UBC) Young’s piece on the Olympic Ski Jumpers,

maybe I shouldn’t be surprised.  But I was on FIFA’s side about the vuvuzelas, so I feel a bit betrayed.

(I should be clear that FIFA’s got some good stuff up about women’s sport as well. But i did think it was all a bit undercut by other material)

see: Margot Young “The IOC Made Me Do it: Women’s Ski Jumping, VANOC, and the 2010 Winter Olympics” (2010) 18 Const. Forum Const. 95-107 available http://ssrn.com/abstract=1615639.

Is Yorku Safe?

This long awaited report (the process was started in 2007) has finally been released and is available here in pdf.

In President Shoukri’s covering letter (click here), he writes:

….one of the most prominent themes from the METRAC safety audit is the need to develop a more pronounced culture of safety and security for all community members. …The report also highlights opportunities for the enhancement to our services, programs, policies, and infrastructure. For those reasons, I have appointed Gary Brewer, Vice-President Finance and Administration, to lead a pan-University committee to review the report and develop a comprehensive action plan which will be developed over the summer. In early September, I will provide an update to the York Community….