Category Archives: Calls for…

CFP: Gendered Dissent, Democracy and the Law: A workshop on the gendered face of Canada’s crackdown on dissent

dissent

via Osgoode graduate students Estair van Wagner and Charis Kempuis:

Gendered Dissent, Democracy and the Law:

A workshop on the gendered face of Canada’s crackdown on dissent

 

May 12-13, 2014  Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Toronto, Ontario

The Gender & Dissent Working Group of the Dissent, Democracy & the Law Research Network and the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies invite proposals for papers and other interventions to be presented at a workshop that aims to bring scholars and advocates together to consider the gendered dimensions of dissent in Canada and Quebec.

The Workshop:  This two-day workshop will bring a small and diverse group of legal scholars and advocates together in Toronto to theorize, and respond to, the challenges faced by advocates and civil society organizations and individuals working on issues of gender equality in Canada and Quebec.  In many cases, these challenges stem from governmental use of legal and extralegal measures that undermine the capacity of individuals, civil society organizations and institutions to participate in public debate on key policy issues at the local, provincial or federal level.

 

Gendered Dissent, Democracy & the Law  Concerns about the increasing constriction of legal and political space for civil society organizations in Canada resonate with global discussions about the restriction of dissent and other efforts to control public dialogue about government policy and action. While the nature of the state-civil society relationship is a site for ongoing debate, the freedom to critique and oppose government decisions and positions is an essential element of ensuring healthy democratic institutions and practices, including the protection of fundamental human rights.

 

In Canada, a combination of legal and policy measures have functioned to reduce the legal, financial and political space available to civil society organizations, particularly those whose work and public positions differ from those of the government. A number of specific methods employed by the federal government to restrict dissent have been identified through preliminary research by the Voices-Voix Documentation Project: the threat or revocation of charitable status, defunding, harassment/privacy violation, withholding information, interference with independent institutions, surveillance, and vilification/smearing.  In some cases, rhetorical vilification has carried implicit or even explicit overtones of criminalization.[1] Media reports have pointed to the Voices-Voix research in highlighting the federal government’s attack on dissent.[2] Further theoretical inquiry into the impact of such tactics on democratic institutions and practices, at all levels of government, is an essential component of understanding the relationship between dissent and democracy.

 

Research undertaken to date indicates that women and gendered-focused civil society organizations attempting to critically discuss government policy decisions are the target of legal and extralegal measures that undermine their capacity to participate in public debate and dissent on important policy issues. In particular, it appears that these practices have impacted those working on gender and socio-economic equality. While the application of these measures to women and groups working on gender issues appears to be part of a broader shift in the relationship between the state and civil society, a close examination of the gender-based features of this shift has the potential to bring specific nuance and insight into the political nature of this shift. The Gendered Dissent, Democracy and the Law workshop will be a focused examination aimed at documenting and theorizing gender and dissent in Canada. We also acknowledge that this focus has limitations, particularly with respect to how one draws the boundaries between ‘gender’ issues and other civil society issues. As such, we encourage debate on both the substantive issues articulated here, as well as the very terms of their articulation.

 

Call for Submissions:  

We welcome interventions from scholars, civil society organizations and advocates that aim to:

a)     Document and describe specific instances and impacts of particular state measures, at any level of government, on public advocacy efforts and/or civil society organizations working on gender issues in order to develop an empirical picture of the problem;

b)     Document and describe state support for organizations whose work and public positions support current policy goals, and other promotional tactics, towards the construction of representations of public “agreement” or “support” for specific policy decisions and/or constructions of gender, nationhood and race;

c)      Examine the historical context of the relationship between the state and public advocacy efforts and/or civil society organizations working on gender issues to explore whether the current restriction of dissent is qualitatively different than in the past, and if so, how;

d)     Critically consider whether and how state practices targeting dissent are distinctive when they are aimed at women or gendered groups; and,

e)     Draw links between particular instances to identify broader themes with regards to the constriction of legal and political space for advocates and civil society organizations working on gender equality issues and the relationship between dissent and democracy.

 

Please submit proposals along with a CV for each author to genderanddissent@gmail.com by February 21, 2014. Proposals should be approximately 250 words in length and should identify whether the intervention will be offered as a scholarly paper or in another format, such as a case study or report or multimedia presentation. Papers (approximately 10 pages in length) will be circulated by the organizers 10-days in advance of the workshop; other interventions will be shared in advance as appropriate.

 

We regret that participation in the workshop will be limited to a small group. We anticipate that we will be unable to accept all of the proposals we receive. However, it is our hope that the workshop will launch ongoing inquires into this topic and related issues. We will communicate both the results of the workshop and plans for follow-up events with all applicants and we look forward to future collaborations.

 

The organizers aim to have scholarly paper submissions published in a special issue of a selected law journal. Contributions which take other forms will be published or otherwise shared in collaboration with our civil society partners as appropriate.

 

Travel Funds

Although we have limited funds, we may be able to provide modest support and assistance with travel and accommodation expenses.  If you require assistance to attend the workshop, please provide the details of the cost for return travel to Toronto and accommodation and indicate other funding sources you have identified/applied to as well as the portion of your expenses you are able to cover. We will notify accepted participants of any funding we can offer as soon as possible.


[1] The Voices-Voix civil society coalition was formed in 2010 in response to concerns about the restriction of political space for civil society organizations. The Documentation Project aims to research and record specific cases: http://voices-voix.ca/en/facts. Since September 2013, the Dissent, Democracy & the Law Editorial Board has undertaken to conduct peer-reviewed research that advances the digital publication of the Documentation Project. A description of the Board and its members can be found here: http://voices-voix.ca/en/editorial-board-2013-2014.

[2] For example, see Linda Diebel’s November 2013, “Meanness is a way of life in Ottawa” in the Toronto Star: http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/11/20/meanness_is_a_way_of_life_in_ottawa.html.

Rebick & Zemon Davis @yorku; Feminism & the Academy at Western

As always, the latest CFR (Centre for Feminist Research at York) is full of gems – talks, CFP’s, opportunities.  
What a choice at Yorku for October 24th!
poster for Natalie Zemon Davis talk (all info in text of post)
Natalie Zemon Davis  “Regaining Jerusalem: Eschatology and slavery in Jewish colonization in early modern Suriname”

Annual Ioan Davies Annual Lecture October 24th from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. in Osgoode Moot Court with a reception to follow.

University of Toronto social historian and Professor Emerita of Princeton University, Professor Davis is one of the foremost living historians, of the early modern world especially, and a pioneer in women’s history. She is the author of The Return of Martin Guerre, Fiction in the Archives, Trickster Travels, among numerous other influential works. She received the order of Canada in 2012 and in July was awarded the National Humanities Medal from US President Barack Obama in a White House ceremony.  Read a profile of her here.
The Ioan Davies Memorial Lecture commemorates the life and work of Ioan Davies, who explored art and popular culture in terms of the kinds of opportunities they offer for common political action. Davies was the author of several works of fiction and non-fiction, including Cultural Studies and Beyond: Fragments of Empire, Writers in Prison, and Social Mobility and Political Change. Davies taught graduate courses on aesthetics and contemporary critical theory in the Department of Social & Political Thought in York’s Faculty of Art and was influential in establishing the African Studies Program and the Graduate Program in Communication and Culture.

Talk by Judy Rebick: “Occupy Education: Towards a Social Justice Approach for Inclusive and Equitable Education”, York University,

Thursday, Oct. 24, from 6:30 to 8:30pm, at 135 Vanier College, Keele campus.

The York Centre for Education& Community (YCEC) fall 2013 public lecture will feature well-known social justice activist, writer, broadcaster and speaker Judy Rebick.   Rebick will talk about challenging the existing system of education to create a system that is more inclusive and more diverse. Despite steps towards diversity that began in the 1980s, progress has slowed. Using lessons from new movements like Occupy and Idle No More, Rebick will show the importance of changing the way we educate to achieve diversity and inclusion.

Judy Rebick: From 2002 until 2010, Rebick held the Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy, having been appointed to it upon its creation. She is also the founding publisher of Rabble.ca, Canada’s most popular independent online news and discussion site. She is the author of several books and articles, most recently Transforming Power: From the Personal to the Political (Penguin, 2009) and Ten Thousand Roses: The Making of a Feminist Revolution (Penguin, 2005). Her other books are Imagine Democracy (Stoddard, 2000) and Politically Speaking (Douglas & McIntyre, 1996). During the 1990’s, Rebick was the host of two national TV shows on CBC Newsworld and a frequent commentator on CBC radio and television. She also contributes commentaries to a host of newspapers and magazines. She is perhaps best known to Canadians as a former president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women, Canada’s largest women’s group. Rebick is also a board member of Alternatives, a Quebec based international non-governmental organization, and is on the advisory boards of Fair Vote Canada and the December 6 Coalition. 
For more information, contact YCEC at 416-650-8458 or by e-mail at ycec@edu.yorku.ca.

 

Future of the Women’s Movement Roundtable Follow-up and Strategizing, University of Ottawa, (October 30, 2013).

Last October, feminist organizations, academics, labour, and other interested individuals came together for a roundtable discussion on the future of the women’s movement. As a follow-up to last year’s event, please join us on October 30, 2013 in the Old Chapel of Tabaret Hall, University of Ottawa, from 9am-4:30pm to learn more about the outcomes of last year’s gathering, our evolving collaboration as Canadian Feminist Voices, and for a facilitated session to develop a feminist strategy leading up to the 2015 federal election. We are still in the process of finalizing the agenda and speakers; more details will be made available soon. Please send your RSVP to canadianfeministvoices@gmail.com including details about any accessibility requirements you may have. Planning Committee: Canadian Association of University Teachers, Canada Centre for Policy Alternatives, Making Women Count Canadian Federation of University Women, Canadian Labour Congress, YWCA Canada. 

 

TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY FEMINISM AND THE ACADEMY  Sponsored by The Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research, Western University, and The Royal Society of Canada (October 19, 2013). The talks will also be available on internet live-feed, and as podcasts at http://www.uwo.ca/womens/pages/events.html. Oct. 19, 2013, 9:30am -6:00pm David S. Chu International Student Centre, Western University, 2130 WSSB. Four distinguished speakers will address the challenges of incorporating feminism and issues of diversity in contemporary Canadian Universities.  Featured Speakers: Carla Fehr, Wolfe Chair in Scientific and Technological Literacy, Philosophy, University of Waterloo. Excellent science: of the people, by the people, for the people, Frances Henry, Professor Emerita, York University Racialization, Gender and the Academy, , Scott Morgensen. Gender Studies, Queen’s University, Indigenous Feminism and Settler Sovereignty: Responding to Idle No More. The talks will also be available on internet live-feed, and as podcasts at  http://www.uwo.ca/womens/pages/events.html. To register  uwo.ca/womens/pages/events.html for the online registration form. More information please contact: Helen Fielding, hfieldin@uwo.ca.

 

CFP x2 Geographies of Violence (Place Space & Time) & Cdn Women as Public Intellectuals

Two really amazing looking CFP’s – one from the Feminism and Legal Theory Project with the conference January in Atlanta, and one from Mount Allison U for 2014.  

 

The Feminism and Legal Theory Project at 30: A Workshop on Geographies of Violence: Place, Space, and Time (Deadline: October 21, 2013)

Location:  Emory University School of Law, Atlanta, Georgia. Date: January 24-25, 2014. The summer of 2013 marks the beginning of the 30th year of operation for the Feminism and Legal Theory Project. During the 2013-2014 academic year we will be looking at the history and impact of feminist legal theory in a variety of key areas of concern to those interested in the institutionalization, construction, and maintenance of gender and gender differences, as well as broader issues of social and economic justice. Following in the footsteps of our workshops on sex and reproduction and the family as areas of early feminist legal scholarship, we will consider violence.

ap11reveal

Thirty years ago the discussions revolved around “domestic violence,” this workshop will look at the issues more broadly. One overarching question in all the sessions is: what is the role for and future of feminist legal theory and gender analysis in a “post-egalitarian” and “intersectional” world in which claims and analyses based on gender differences are viewed with suspicion? Guiding Questions: What “counts” as violence? How does the space and place in which violence occurs affect our responses to it? Why is there such resistance to the idea of wide-spread gendered violence in American politics? What are the different perspectives on violence reflected in disciplines such as law, medicine, public health, anthropology, political science, ethics, and religion? How do societal institutions act in conjunction with or opposition to the state in understanding and addressing violence? What is the relationship between interpersonal violence and structural violence? Between violence and art and culture? Can the state be understood as violent? What are the benefits and drawbacks in looking at violence from a societal or cultural, rather than an individual or criminal justice, perspective? What would a society designed to eliminate violence look like? What is the relationship between “public” and “private” violence? What can we learn from looking at gender-based violence (broadly conceived) among cultures with different traditions, economic organizations and legal frameworks for gender equality? Is gendered violence endemic to all societies, and inherent in human nature? Or are there identifiable causes and remedies? What about violence against children? What is the relationship between neglect and violence? Can violence ever be justified, for example in the cause of humanitarian interventions? How do the categories of “victim/perpetuator,” “domestic violence,” “intimate partner violence,” and “gendered violence” shape our approaches to law and policy? What is “rape culture” and what are its implications for individual cases of aggression? How does violence shift across the course of the lifespan? How and why should we think differently about violence directed toward different age groups: children, youth, adults, and seniors? What can and should be done to address emerging forms of online bullying and virtual violence? Workshop Contacts: Martha Albertson Fineman, mlfinem@emory.edu, Stu Marvel, smarvel@emory.edu. Submission procedure: Email a proposal as a Word or PDF document by October 21, 2013 to Yvana Mol at:ymols@emory.edu. Decisions will be made by October 31 and working paper drafts will be due December 20 so they can be duplicated and distributed prior to the Workshop.  Workshop details: The Workshop begins Friday at 4PM in room 575 of Emory Law School (1301 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA). A dinner in the Hunter Atrium will follow the panel presentation session on Friday.  Panel presentations continue on Saturday from 9:30 AM to 5PM and breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Discourse & Dynamics: Canadian Women as Public Intellectuals : Conference on Women as Public Intellectuals in Canada and Quebec, Mount Allison University, (Deadline: October 31, 2013).

 

Art by Alison Creba, from current exhibition at Owens Art Gallery at Mount Allison University in NB.   Alison Creba: City Mail Poster Meeting Places 20 September to 10 November  The exhibition Meeting Places at the Owens Art Gallery has been planned in conjunction with an international conference on place and space organized by Mount Allison University in Sackville and St. Mary's University in Halifax. The exhibition brings together artists whose work offers definitions of place and inquires into the way place-based communities form, are transformed, migrate, become dispossessed, and occupy territory. The exhibition will feature Eryn Foster, whose practice is based in relational aesthetics, through community actions such as the building of a community oven and the planning of community walks. Eryn will collaborate with Winnipeg artist Ray Fenwick. Also included are First Nations artist Frank Shebageget and New York/Nova Scotia-based artist Tom Sherman who, in their different ways, merge community and identity; and Toronto artist Alison Creba, the founder and facilitator of CITY MAIL, whose work acts as a catalyst for further explorations of the physical and personal topographies that characterize an area, and Mitchell Wiebe, artist-in-residence at the Diefenbunker in Debert, Nova Scotia, one of several bunkers built during the Cold War. Mitchell will collaborate with Halifax artist Aaron Weldon.
Poster for City Mail by Alison Creba

CONFERENCE: 16-18 October 2014, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick. This national conference proposes to appraise women’s contributions to dynamic discourse in Canada and Quebec. Scheduled in conjunction with Persons Day, 18 October 2014, the conference will feature among other notable participants Margaret Atwood, Nicole Brossard, Siila Watt-Cloutier, Jessica Danforth, Charlotte Gray, Pam Palmater, Judy Rebick and Janice Stein.

 

Canadian women have contributed enormously to public discourse, in important but often under-valued ways.  Across different generations and cultural communities, women in English Canada and Quebec address key questions that animate intellectual discussion, from concerns about the environment and the economy to issues of social justice, racism, poverty, health and violence.  But are their voices valued and heard, or are they subsumed in the general noise of public debate?  Why they are not accorded the attention and approbation they merit? The concept of the public intellectual has come under considerable scrutiny in recent years. Classic studies such as The Treason of the Intellectuals (Benda 1928) or The Opium of the Intellectuals (Aron 1957) have been succeeded by further investigations, among them The Last Intellectuals (Jacoby 1987), Representations of the Intellectual (Said 1993), Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline (Posner 2001), Public Intellectuals: An Endangered Species (ed. Etzioni and Bowditch 2006).

 

In 2007, Toronto Star columnist Alex Good asked “What has become of the Canadian public intellectual?” (“Woe is Us,” 8 April 2007) while Queen’s Quarterly published essays on the matter by Michael Ignatieff (“The Decline and Fall of the Public Intellectual” Fall 1997) and Mark Kingwell (“What are Intellectuals for?” Spring 2011).  Kingwell, reflecting on Canada’s most important thinkers, acknowledges that identification is controversial, but mentions McLuhan, Frye, Innis, Woodcock, Grant, Gould, Jacobs, Atwood, Taylor, and Ignatieff.  This list is not untypical–most names are those of men. The National Post’s 2005 search for Canada’s most important public intellectual repeats this bias; of the twenty-two individuals profiled, only four were women, Margaret Atwood, Naomi Klein, Irshad Manji and Margaret McMillan. Yet women in Canada and Quebec have spoken and written on subjects of importance and concern in the public domain, from energy resources to free trade, from economic inequality to policies on immigration, from culture to medicine. Where are their names? Does the “public intellectual” brand effectively exclude women? Does its evolving definition take sufficient account of gender? of race? of class?

Proposals are invited for presentations that explore this topic.  We are open to a wide range of participation, from individual papers to panels, performances, poster sessions, or other displays.  Points of focus might include but are not limited to: refiguring the public intellectual, public intellectuals, activists, academics, artists, commentators: what are the relationships? conditions for the public intellectual, Canadian/Quebec women as public intellectuals of the past/present/future, the internet/blogosphere and the public intellectual, the impact of Canadian/Quebec women’s voices in the public sphere, substance versus style, whom do we listen to and why owning public space, daring to speak out. Proposals for individual or collaborative presentations should include: 1. title (up to 150 characters) 2. abstract

(100-150 words) 3. description (500 words) & on a separate page: 4. a short biographical note 5. full contact information. Proposals may be submitted electronically by October 31, 2013 to DiscourseDynamics@mta.ca ORGANIZERS: Christl Verduyn, Director, Centre for Canadian Studies, Professor, Department of English, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, E4L 1G9. Aritha van Herk, Professor, Department of English, 2500 University Dr. N.W., University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4. A selection of papers will be considered for publication and a follow-up conference is foreseen in 2016 at the University of Calgary.

 

 

 

 

Roundup of Stories from Twitter (jobs, calls, the new Charter of Values etc) for Non Twitter people: Part I

Higher Education: Smaller/Bigger?lego bird on lego horse, with lasso

‏@OsgoodeIFLS 18 Sep  Queen’s plans to expand law school enrolment http://bit.ly/19cyGjr   a revenue move, not an A2J move. “options” for #public #lawschools

Ryan Dunch ‏@DunchinYEG 16h  Impact of Alberta post-secondary cuts felt across the province http://www.cautbulletin.ca/en_article.asp?ArticleID=3690#.UkDFHpUb-bI.twitter  … #abpse #ableg #highered

Calls for…

RT @PHughesLCO: About the forthcoming Call for Project Proposal: Law Commission of Ontario http://www.lco-cdo.org/en#.UjdZFhOEKTM.twitter  …

Canadian Journal of Women and the Law: call for submissions http://www.slsa.ac.uk/news#CJWL

Jobs

@UBCLaw is hiring two (2!) tenure track positions. Home of @FemLegalStudies . #law Details: http://www.law.ubc.ca/files/pdf/faculty/jobs/2013/Law_Gen_Fac_Search_2013_FINAL.pdf

work with loads of fab people. home of @feministsatlaw RT @SLSA_UK: Four posts at Kent Law School http://www.slsa.ac.uk/news#Kent

There’s an App for That: new conlaw nerd tool

Thanks to these folks http://comparativeconstitutionsproject.org/   we get this https://www.constituteproject.org   Compare #constitutions. Form & Function seem top notch.

Try searching “Equality regardless of gender”. #nerdgames #comparative #constitutions https://www.constituteproject.org/#/search   h/t @hargreaves_s

but … the #Canadian #Constitution isn’t there! Did they forget to add it to this #toolfordesigninggovernments ? Hmmm. #googleconstitute

Academics Attacked

‏@OsgoodeIFLS 17 Sep @Yorku prof detained in #Egypt along with Dr. / Latest via @justinpodur Tarek and John on hunger strike http://bit.ly/198TTMu You may remember that Prof.  John Greyson was at Osgoode last year for the IFLS/SALSA presentation of his codirected film Rex v. Singh.

@OsgoodeIFLS 16 Sep Men’s Rights Edmntn helps create Calg chapter, releases truly awful on many levels poster campaign. Forza, @lisegot http://bit.ly/1eIXZ4Z

[Silver lining ]Lise Gotell ‏@LiseGot 16 Sep Personal attacks can have positive consequences. I’ve had so many messages of support today. I am humbled! #consent #equality.

Quebec Charter of Values

‏@OsgoodeIFLS 10 Sep  I thought infographic circulating this AM was a joke. Joke’s on me. #whatnottowear #valeursQC @BDrainvillePQ http://www.nosvaleurs.gouv.qc.ca/en/propositions/3  …

Hugo Cyr ‏@ProfCyr 11 Sep U don’t agree with #PQ s #charte des #valeursQc? Good time to reinstate the Charter challenge prog that U slashed Mr #Harper? #cdnpoli #NDP

Really interesting RT @ADodek: Quebec charter pitch exposes deep split within feminist ranks http://m.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/quebec-charter-proposal-proves-divisive-for-provinces-feminists/article14440417/?service=mobile#!/  … #Qcpoli #women #feminism

Visual Religious Symbols & Law Alison Dundes Reteln h/t JF Gaudreault-DesBiens http://bit.ly/18moo3c   perception of threat #charterofvalues

….and Claire L’Heureux-Dubé, surprising a few (but not me)

But not surprising RT @EmmMacfarlane Frmr SCC Justice L’Heureux-Dube supports QC #valuescharter Mighty disappointing http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/09/21/amnesty-international-warns-quebec-values-charter-would-violate-fundamental-rights/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter  …

Now you need a laugh.

RT @GalldinRoberts: Judge to me 2day: the law is like pantyhose that fits nobody. Me: thats why I don’t wear pantyhose your honour #lawyers

Jen Otis-Fensom ‏@JenFensom 10 Sep I 100% disagree with the Charter of Quebec values. I do agree that the 70s-style open collar is a bad look, though.