Category Archives: Co-hosted events

Feb 13 12-3 Gowlings Hall, photos for Law Needs Feminism Because…2019 ed.

The Osgoode Feminist Collective, in collaboration with the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, is pleased to announce this year’s #LawNeedsFeminismBecause campaign. LNFB is a photo campaign held at law schools across Canada meant to facilitate dialogue on issues relating to gender, diversity and inclusivity in law schools, the legal profession and the justice system. If you’re not familiar with the campaign, please visit https://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/mission/

A few notes about participating:
– Please come prepared with a caption for your photo
– Please refrain from defining “law” or “feminism” in your captions
– If your caption contains a quote, please include its source
– Your photos will turn out best if you wear clothing in solid, neutral tones

Inclusivity, accessibility, and diversity are pillars of LNFB’s campaign. Please stay in tune with these principles.

Please note that all participants will be asked to sign a release so that their photos can be included in the national campaign. Releases will be available at the table in Gowlings, but for those who are able it would be helpful if you brought signed releases with you. Click here to print/sign.  

On behalf of OFC and IFLS, we hope to see you there!

 

Photos from national campaign website:

 

U calgary

 

U de Sherbrooke
U vic

 

March 13 1230 Meskerem Geset Techane, Vice Chair – UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women

GENDER, CONFINEMENT & THE STATE

with  Meskerem Geset Techane, Vice Chair- UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women

Wednesday, February 13th 2019, 12:30 pm to 2:00 pm, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building, Room 2028

Meskerem Geset Techane is the Vice-Chair of the UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women. A human rights lawyer picture of Meskerem Geset Techane at a conferencewith extensive experience working at the national and international levels, her previous positions include High Court Judge and Head of School of Law (Oromia Public Service College) in Ethiopia, and Deputy Executive Director of the Institute for Human Rights in Africa and expert group member with the African Union human rights bodies. She is a fellow at the Human Rights Centre, University of Padova and an associate scholar at the Women’s Human Rights Education Institute, University of Toronto.

All are invited to attend.  RSVP: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

osgoode folks, there’s time to get your pic done at Osgoode Feminist Collective’s “Law Needs Feminism because….” event [click here for details] in Gowlings Hall before or after this talk]

CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION (co sponsored with Hennick Centre) Feb 14 2019

Hennick Centre for Business and Law  Institute for Feminist Legal Studies present you with a small Valentine:

CARLOS A. BALL

The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION

February 14 2019 1230-2PM  |  IKB 2027 (Osgoode Hall Law School)  Lunch Served

RSVP here

Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press’s LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law.

Hennick Centre for Business and Law | Institute for Feminist Legal Studies CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICA CORPORATION February 14 2019 1230-2PM IKB 2027 Lunch Served | RSVP bit.ly/qthecorp Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press's LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law. In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as "The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally" (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality. Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people. Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as “The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally” (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality.  Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people.

 

 

Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

 

 

Empowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique: Talk by Terezinha da Silva March 20 2017

EmpowEmpowering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique. Talk by Terezinha da Silva. Monday, March 20, 2017 Kaneff Tower 519 2:00am – 4:30pm All are welcome! The last decade has seen a coal mining boom in northern Mozambique with the arrival of Riversdale, Rio Tinto, Vale and Jindal. The Mozambican government has welcomed these investments as the guarantee of economic growth, jobs and poverty alleviation. Brazil has given strong backing to its corporations in Africa, within an upbeat narrative of South-South solidarity. For the mining communities, it has been a story of unfulfilled promises. There have been forced resettlements of traditional farmers without prior consultation or respect for land rights. Vale has relocated them in a rural area with houses, schools and a health post but no land or means of livelihood. The influx of miners has exacerbated already scarce social and infrastructure in the region, overcrowding roads, schools and hospitals and creating social problems. While there have been many general studies of impacted communities, WLSA’s research project is the first study looking specifically at the impact on women and girls from a gender perspective. The study analyses, in context of resettlements, how women and men produce their responses as a result of mining actions. Terezinha da Silva will talk about the community workshops based on the research and the challenges of taking up these issues in communities with patriarchal traditions still deeply embedded. Speaker’s Bio: Terezinha da Silva (Mozambique) is currently the national coordinator of WLSA Mozambique (Women and Law in Southern Africa), a regional NGO working on women human’s rights. She is also the board member of different NGO’s working on themes related to community development, social studies, children, gender and women issues and ageing. Her other professional experiences are related to management and institutional development. She worked for many years at the Ministry of Health and Social Action. She also has a wide range of experiences in teaching planning and management, including curriculum development of national courses. Her research experience include areas related to public policies, gender and development, integrity of the judiciary, unpaid care work, gender audit and ageing. She holds a Masters degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics. Co-sponsors: The Harriet Tubman Institute, African Studies, Global Labour Research Centre, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Law and Society (LASO), The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (IFLS),Centre for Feminist Research. ering Women and Girls in Mining Communities in Mozambique:

Talk by Terezinha da Silva.

Monday, March 20, 2017
Kaneff Tower 519
2:00am – 4:30pm

All are welcome!

The last decade has seen a coal mining boom in northern Mozambique with the arrival of Riversdale, Rio Tinto, Vale and Jindal. The Mozambican government has welcomed these investments as the guarantee of economic growth, jobs and poverty alleviation. Brazil has given strong backing to its corporations in Africa, within an upbeat narrative of South-South solidarity. For the mining communities, it has been a story of unfulfilled promises. There have been forced resettlements of traditional farmers without prior consultation or respect for land rights. Vale has relocated them in a rural area with houses, schools and a health post but no land or means of livelihood. The influx of miners has exacerbated already scarce social and infrastructure in the region, overcrowding roads, schools and hospitals and creating social problems. While there have been many general studies of impacted communities, WLSA’s research project is the first study looking specifically at the impact on women and girls from a gender perspective. The study analyses, in context of resettlements, how women and men produce their responses as a result of mining actions. Terezinha da Silva will talk about the community workshops based on the research and the challenges of taking up these issues in communities with patriarchal traditions still deeply embedded.

Terezinha da Silva (Mozambique) is currently the national coordinator of WLSA Mozambique (Women and Law in Southern Africa), a regional NGO  working on women human’s rights. She is also the board member of different NGO’s working on themes related to community development, social studies, children, gender and women issues and ageing. Her other professional experiences are related to management and institutional development.  She worked for many years at the Ministry of Health and  Social Action.  She also has a wide range of experiences in teaching planning and management, including curriculum development of national courses. Her research experience include areas related to public policies, gender and development, integrity of the judiciary, unpaid care work, gender audit and ageing. She holds a Masters degree in Social Policy and Planning from the London School of Economics.

Co-sponsors: The Harriet Tubman Institute, African Studies, Global Labour Research Centre, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Law and Society (LASO), The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode (IFLS),Centre for Feminist Research.

March 8 LRST/IFLS presents Leslie Griffin: “Institutional or Individual: What is Religious Freedom in the United States Today?”

Prof. Leslie C Griffin (UNLV Law) “Institutional or Individual: What is Religious Freedom in the United States Today?”

All information on poster is in text of post

This paper will argue that the U.S. government has usually interpreted religious freedom to protect institutions and frequently ignored the interests of religious individuals. Interpreting the Free Exercise Clause to protect religious institutions’ rights against their members ignores the experience of the earliest Americans. Allowing the courts to enforce a rule that automatically favors religious institutions over their members is at odds with the early history of liberty of conscience.

This talk will look at two examples of the courts privileging institutions over individuals. First, the ministerial exception allows church employees’ claims against their employers to be dismissed without lawsuit. Second, RFRA (the Religious Freedom Restoration Act) permits religious employers to deny full health insurance coverage to their employees.  The talk then explores the alternative, individual approach to law and religion, which the courts should favor in the future.

Wednesday, March 8, at 12:30-2 at Osgoode Hall law School, in the Faculty Common Room, room 2027.

Prof. Leslie C. Griffin (Boyd School of Law, UNLV) is a constitutional scholar known for her interdisciplinary work in law and religion, with a particular focus on the interface of religious liberties, gender, and equality in the United States.  She is the author of numerous articles and book chapters about law, religion, politics and ethics, and her recent works include “A Word of Warning from A Woman: Arbitrary, Categorical, and Hidden Religious Exemptions Threaten LGBT Rights,” 7 Ala. C.R. & C.L.L. Rev. 97 (2015) and “The Catholic Bishops vs. the Contraceptive Mandate,” Religions 2015, 6, 1411–1432, available here.