Category Archives: Co-hosted events

Indigenous Law, Gender and Land: Friday January 17 at Osgoode

INDIGENOUS LAW, GENDER & LAND with Dr. Heidi Stark | Dr. Cheryl Suzack | Dr. Deborah McGregor

Friday January 17, 2020 1230-230

ATTENTION: ROOM CHANGE TO Helliwell Centre, Osgoode Hall Law School ROOM 1014

Lunch Served. Please RSVP for Space/Food Purposes bit.ly/ILGLJan17

Panellists:

Dr. Heidi Stark, UVic Political Science

Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe) received her Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, in 2008. Her doctoral research focused on Anishinaabe treaty-making with the United States and Canada and serves as the foundation for her manuscript Unsettled: Anishinaabe Treaty-Relations and U.S./Canada State-Formation (In progress, University of Minnesota Press, First Peoples Series).

Her primary area of research and teaching is in the field of Indigenous Comparative Politics, Native Diplomacy & Treaty and Aboriginal Rights. She is the co-editor of Centering Anishinaabeg Studies: Understanding the World Through Stories with Jill Doerfler and Niigaanwewidam Sinclair (Michigan State University Press, 2013) and is the co-author of the third edition of American Indian Politics and the American Political System (2010) with Dr. David E. Wilkins.

Professor Cheryl Suzack, U of T English

Cheryl Suzack’s research focuses on Indigenous law and literature with a particular emphasis on writing by Indigenous women. In her book, Indigenous Women’s Writing and the Cultural Study of Law, she explores how Indigenous women’s writing from Canada and the United States addresses case law concerning tribal membership, intergenerational residential school experiences, and land claims. Her current project analyzes Justice Thurgood Marshall’s papers in the context of Indian civil rights claims from the 1960s. She is a co-editor (with Greig Henderson and Simon Stern) of “The Critical Work of Law and Literature,” University of Toronto Quarterly (Fall 2013) and a co-editor and contributor (with Shari Huhndorf, Jeanne Perreault, and Jean Barman) to the award-winning collection, Indigenous Women and Feminism: Politics, Activism, Culture (UBC 2010). Suzack is cross-appointed to the Aboriginal Studies Program and teaches courses for English and Aboriginal Studies on comparative Indigenous literatures, comparative Indigenous studies, and Indigenous decolonization with a focus on gender issues and Indigenous women.

Professor Deborah McGregor (Osgoode)

Professor Deborah McGregor joined York University’s Osgoode Hall law faculty in 2015 as a cross-appointee with the Faculty of Environmental Studies. Professor McGregor’s research has focused on Indigenous knowledge systems and their various applications in diverse contexts including water and environmental governance, environmental justice, forest policy and management, and sustainable development. Her research has been published in a variety of national and international journals and she has delivered numerous public and academic presentations relating to Indigenous knowledge systems, governance and sustainability. She co-edited Indigenous Peoples and Autonomy: Insights for a Global Age with Mario Blaser, Ravi De Costa and William Coleman (2010). She is co-editor (with Alan Corbiere, Mary Ann Corbiere and Crystal Migwans) of the Anishinaabewin conference proceedings series.

Professor McGregor, who is Anishinaabe from Whitefish River First Nation, Birch Island, Ontario, is the Primary Investigator on two current SSHRC-funded projects: Indigenous Environmental (In)Justice: theory and practice and Indigenizing the First Nations Land Management Regime.

Prior to joining Osgoode, Professor McGregor was an associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Toronto and served as Director of the Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives and the Aboriginal Studies program. She has also served as Senior Policy Advisor, Aboriginal Relations at Environment Canada-Ontario Region. In addition to such posts, Professor McGregor remains actively involved in a variety of Indigenous communities, serving as an advisor and continuing to engage in community-based research and initiatives.

Professor McGregor coordinated an Indigenous Environmental Justice (IEJ) Symposium in May 2016 featuring the voices of women and youth. She also recently launched an IEJ website.

Co sponsors: Osgoode Intensive Program in Indigenous Lands, Resources & Governments; Osgoode Environmental Justice Clinic; Osgoode Institute for Feminist Legal Studies

event poster - all information in in the text of the post

Professor Vasuki Nesiah “Is gender sensitive transitional justice the feminism we were aiming for?” October 18 2019 at Osgoode

“TELL ALL THE TRUTH BUT TELL IT SLANT”
Is gender sensitive transitional justice the feminism we were aiming for?

Professor Vasuki Nesiah, Gallatin School NYU

FRIDAY OCTOBER 18 2019
1230-2PM
FACULTY LOUNGE | IKB 2027
OSGOODE HALL LAW SCHOOL

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co presented with Law Arts Culture .

“From Rigobertu Menchu to Anne Frank, the testimonials of women and girls are often seen to have particular authority in ‘speaking truth to power’ and bearing witness to vulnerable communities’ experience of genocidal violence and their fortitude in resistance. Feminist celebration of ‘narrative truth’ has rendered truth commissions a particularly important site of feminist engagement.

At the same time, feminist analysis of the politics of knowledge and their mobilization in the commission of truth has drawn attention to the fraught stakes of categories such as victimhood, voice and injury. This talk will engage in the debate by thinking with Paulina in Ariel Dorfman’s play, Death and the Maiden.

Feb 13 12-3 Gowlings Hall, photos for Law Needs Feminism Because…2019 ed.

The Osgoode Feminist Collective, in collaboration with the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, is pleased to announce this year’s #LawNeedsFeminismBecause campaign. LNFB is a photo campaign held at law schools across Canada meant to facilitate dialogue on issues relating to gender, diversity and inclusivity in law schools, the legal profession and the justice system. If you’re not familiar with the campaign, please visit https://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/mission/

A few notes about participating:
– Please come prepared with a caption for your photo
– Please refrain from defining “law” or “feminism” in your captions
– If your caption contains a quote, please include its source
– Your photos will turn out best if you wear clothing in solid, neutral tones

Inclusivity, accessibility, and diversity are pillars of LNFB’s campaign. Please stay in tune with these principles.

Please note that all participants will be asked to sign a release so that their photos can be included in the national campaign. Releases will be available at the table in Gowlings, but for those who are able it would be helpful if you brought signed releases with you. Click here to print/sign.  

On behalf of OFC and IFLS, we hope to see you there!

 

Photos from national campaign website:

 

U calgary

 

U de Sherbrooke

U vic

 

March 13 1230 Meskerem Geset Techane, Vice Chair – UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women

GENDER, CONFINEMENT & THE STATE

with  Meskerem Geset Techane, Vice Chair- UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women

Wednesday, February 13th 2019, 12:30 pm to 2:00 pm, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building, Room 2028

Meskerem Geset Techane is the Vice-Chair of the UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women. A human rights lawyer picture of Meskerem Geset Techane at a conferencewith extensive experience working at the national and international levels, her previous positions include High Court Judge and Head of School of Law (Oromia Public Service College) in Ethiopia, and Deputy Executive Director of the Institute for Human Rights in Africa and expert group member with the African Union human rights bodies. She is a fellow at the Human Rights Centre, University of Padova and an associate scholar at the Women’s Human Rights Education Institute, University of Toronto.

All are invited to attend.  RSVP: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

osgoode folks, there’s time to get your pic done at Osgoode Feminist Collective’s “Law Needs Feminism because….” event [click here for details] in Gowlings Hall before or after this talk]

CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION (co sponsored with Hennick Centre) Feb 14 2019

Hennick Centre for Business and Law  Institute for Feminist Legal Studies present you with a small Valentine:

CARLOS A. BALL

The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION

February 14 2019 1230-2PM  |  IKB 2027 (Osgoode Hall Law School)  Lunch Served

RSVP here

Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press’s LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law.

Hennick Centre for Business and Law | Institute for Feminist Legal Studies CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICA CORPORATION February 14 2019 1230-2PM IKB 2027 Lunch Served | RSVP bit.ly/qthecorp Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press's LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law. In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as "The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally" (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality. Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people. Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as “The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally” (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality.  Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people.

 

 

Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca