All posts by Sonia Lawrence

March 8 : Mosher & Koshan, Domestic Violence before the Canadian Courts: Intersections, impacts, identities

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE THE CANADIAN COURTS: INTERSECTIONS, IMPACTS, IDENTITIES Date: 8-Mar-2019 Time: 01:30 PM - 03:30 PM Location: Room 2027, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building Link: RSVP JENNIFER KOSHAN (CALGARY LAW) & JANET MOSHER (OSGOODE) "Domestic violence cases present unique access to justice issues, especially when litigants are required to navigate multiple legal systems. In Canada, parties affected by domestic violence may face legal issues encompassing numerous laws, including criminal, family, child protection, civil protection, housing, social assistance, immigration and refugee laws, each of which has its own legal processes. This presentation will explore the extent to which law/policy makers and judges take account of the difficulties and dangers that may arise for these parties when laws and legal systems intersect. Our initial findings indicate that state actors often ignore these intersections or proceed on problematic assumptions about them; they fail to attend to the complexities presented by litigants’ identities, such as their Indigeneity and immigration status; and they tend to minimize the impact of domestic violence on women and children, thereby jeopardizing safety and impeding access to justice DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BEFORE THE CANADIAN COURTS: INTERSECTIONS, IMPACTS, IDENTITIES

Friday 8-Mar-2019 Time: 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM Room 2027,  Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building
RSVP

JENNIFER KOSHAN (CALGARY LAW) & JANET MOSHER (OSGOODE)

Domestic violence cases present unique access to justice issues, especially when litigants are required to navigate multiple legal systems. In Canada, parties affected by domestic violence may face legal issues encompassing numerous laws, including criminal, family, child protection, civil protection, housing, social assistance, immigration and refugee laws, each of which has its own legal processes.

This presentation will  explore the extent to which law/policy makers and judges take account of the difficulties and dangers that may arise for these parties when laws and legal systems intersect. Our initial findings indicate that state actors often ignore these intersections or proceed on problematic assumptions about them; they fail to attend to the complexities presented by litigants’ identities, such as their Indigeneity and immigration status; and they tend to minimize the impact of domestic violence on women and children, thereby jeopardizing safety and impeding access to justice

 

 

Feb 13 12-3 Gowlings Hall, photos for Law Needs Feminism Because…2019 ed.

The Osgoode Feminist Collective, in collaboration with the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies, is pleased to announce this year’s #LawNeedsFeminismBecause campaign. LNFB is a photo campaign held at law schools across Canada meant to facilitate dialogue on issues relating to gender, diversity and inclusivity in law schools, the legal profession and the justice system. If you’re not familiar with the campaign, please visit https://www.lawneedsfeminismbecause.ca/mission/

A few notes about participating:
– Please come prepared with a caption for your photo
– Please refrain from defining “law” or “feminism” in your captions
– If your caption contains a quote, please include its source
– Your photos will turn out best if you wear clothing in solid, neutral tones

Inclusivity, accessibility, and diversity are pillars of LNFB’s campaign. Please stay in tune with these principles.

Please note that all participants will be asked to sign a release so that their photos can be included in the national campaign. Releases will be available at the table in Gowlings, but for those who are able it would be helpful if you brought signed releases with you. Click here to print/sign.  

On behalf of OFC and IFLS, we hope to see you there!

 

Photos from national campaign website:

 

U calgary

 

U de Sherbrooke
U vic

 

March 13 1230 Meskerem Geset Techane, Vice Chair – UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women

GENDER, CONFINEMENT & THE STATE

with  Meskerem Geset Techane, Vice Chair- UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women

Wednesday, February 13th 2019, 12:30 pm to 2:00 pm, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building, Room 2028

Meskerem Geset Techane is the Vice-Chair of the UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women. A human rights lawyer picture of Meskerem Geset Techane at a conferencewith extensive experience working at the national and international levels, her previous positions include High Court Judge and Head of School of Law (Oromia Public Service College) in Ethiopia, and Deputy Executive Director of the Institute for Human Rights in Africa and expert group member with the African Union human rights bodies. She is a fellow at the Human Rights Centre, University of Padova and an associate scholar at the Women’s Human Rights Education Institute, University of Toronto.

All are invited to attend.  RSVP: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

osgoode folks, there’s time to get your pic done at Osgoode Feminist Collective’s “Law Needs Feminism because….” event [click here for details] in Gowlings Hall before or after this talk]

Feb 11 at Osgoode: Florence Ashley Lunch talk “Torture Isn’t Therapy: Prohibiting Transgender Reparative Therapy”

Lunch talk “Torture Isn’t Therapy: Prohibiting Transgender Reparative Therapy”

Date: 11-Feb-2019
Time: 12:30 PM – 02:30 PM
Location: Room 3067, Nathanson Centre, Osgoode Hall Law School, Ignat Kaneff Building
Link: RSVP

Florence Ashley is a transfeminine activist based in the unceded Kanien’kehá:ka lands of Tiohtià:ke (also known as Montreal), and LL.M. candidate at McGill University Faculty of Law, specialising in bioethics with a focus on transgender healthcare law. Their thesis bears on the legality of conversion therapy targeting gender identity.

She has a B.C.L. and LL.B. from McGill University Faculty of Law. She is a recipient of the SSHRC Canada Graduate Scholarship, Master’s Award and a fellow of the McGill Research Group on Health and Law. She has previously held an O’Brien Fellowship at the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism and has received the Bourse Dorais-Ryan of the Conseil québécois LGBT. Florence is active in local trans, feminist, and queer communities, most notably as part of the Advisory Board of the Trans Legal Clinic and as a member of the Comité trans of the Conseil québécois LGBT. She was the 2019 recipient of the Canadian Bar Association’s LGBTT Hero Award.

Florence Ashley Poster.pdf

CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION (co sponsored with Hennick Centre) Feb 14 2019

Hennick Centre for Business and Law  Institute for Feminist Legal Studies present you with a small Valentine:

CARLOS A. BALL

The QUEERING of the AMERICAN CORPORATION

February 14 2019 1230-2PM  |  IKB 2027 (Osgoode Hall Law School)  Lunch Served

RSVP here

Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press’s LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law.

Hennick Centre for Business and Law | Institute for Feminist Legal Studies CARLOS A. BALL The QUEERING of the AMERICA CORPORATION February 14 2019 1230-2PM IKB 2027 Lunch Served | RSVP bit.ly/qthecorp Carlos A. Ball is Distinguished Professor of Law and Judge Frederick Lacey Research Scholar at Rutgers University. He has published several book on LGBT rights, including The First Amendment and LGBT Equality (Harvard University Press, 2017), After Marriage Equality (NYU Press, 2016), and Same-Sex Marriage and Children (Oxford University Press, 2014). He is currently serving as Senior Editor of Oxford University Press's LGBT Politics and Policy Research Encyclopedia. He teaches courses on Constitutional Law, the First Amendment, and Sexuality, Gender Identity, and the Law. In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as "The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally" (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality. Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people. Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

In this Hennick/IFLS co sponsored talk, Professor Ball will outline his arguments, to be published as “The Queering of Corporate America: How Big Business Went from LGBT Adversary to Ally” (Beacon Press, forthcoming 2019), and answer questions about his arguments and their implications. He will explore the largely untold story of how the U.S. LGBT rights movement, in the decades following Stonewall, helped to turn large American companies from pervasive discriminators against sexual minorities and transgender individuals to defenders of LGBT equality.  Big businesses are essentially conservative institutions that do not usually weigh in on controversial “culture war” issues. His talk will argue that corporate support for LGBT equality—as manifested, for example, recently in corporate America’s vehement opposition to so-called transgender bathroom laws—is an exception to that general rule. At a time when the LGBT rights movement in the U.S. is facing considerable political backlash following crucial victories such as the attainment of marriage equality across the country, corporate America has become a crucial ally of LGBT people.

 

 

Questions? LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca