Asides

Random Girls rule

oh my.  Doctor claims in lawsuit that “out-of-wedlock conception deprived him of the choice of falling in love, marrying, and choosing when to have a child.” Toronto judge rightly chucks it out.  Here.   Such a small thing, but here it is, Saturday night and all the interesting bits of Pride and Prejudice are over, only the mush is left.  So, a few things….

1. the information including the age of the child and age of the woman does seem to open doors for possible identification.

2.    Now THIS is how it’s done:

“But then came the text message at 7:06 p.m. on Aug. 10, 2014, that would shock PP and change his life forever.

DD said she was 10 weeks pregnant with PP’s baby, according to the statement of claim.

PP wanted her to get an abortion.

DD said no.

PP said, “I don’t want to have a baby with some random girl.”

DD said, “This random girl is fine doing it on her own.””

3. the “emotional damage” here, might, with some escalation, approach what at least one Canadian legal scholar (ok, on twitter) seemed to suggest would meet the R. v. Hutchinson [2014] 1 SCR 346 (because there were a surprising number of people who only wanted to talk about Hutchinson in terms of “but what about when the women do it”).  This is in tort, though, obviously.

4. The lawyer who drafted the statement of claim is, mercifully for them perhaps, not named.  Am I being too dismissive of the strength of the claimant’s argument? #notatortexpertunderanydefinitionofexpert.

Source: Doctor sues mother of his child for emotional damages | Toronto Star

NIP: Why Some Men Are Above the Law by Martha C. Nussbaum

Famous men standardly get away with sexual harms, and for the most part will continue to do so. They know they are above the law, and they are therefore undeterrable. What can society do? Don’t give actors and athletes such glamor and reputational power. But that won’t happen in the real world. What can women do? Don’t be fooled by glamor. Do not date such men, unless you know them very, very well. Do not go to their homes. Never be alone in a room with them. And if you ignore my sage advice and encounter trouble, move on. Do not let your life get hijacked by an almost certainly futile effort at justice. Focus on your own welfare, and in this case that means: forget the law.

Source: Why Some Men Are Above the Law | Martha C. Nussbaum

An interesting intervention from the eminent scholar.  One question this leaves open for me is this – how are we defining famous?  I wonder whether in truth it is defined largely in relation to the standing of the woman in question and calibrated to the jurisdiction. Famous enough…

A storify re: Reclaiming our Narratives: Racial and Gender Profiling in Toronto

Storify just collects tweets, so you can use it to tell a story about an event or issue.  Here’s one I put together after attending this event, (you can see the event announcement here).
It was great. Congratulations to the organizers on a really well put together public event.  I met some really great women, learned a lot, had feelings and thoughts at the same time (!), wallowed in being one of the oldest people in the room.  Sometimes folks ask me, what’s up with the younger feminists, what are they reading, what are they doing, what are they thinking?  Here’s one piece of the answer.  Been to any really great events related to feminism and law lately? Want to post about them, even after the fact? About the experience of being there? Let me know.

-sonia

 

got new feminist colleagues?

A quick reminder to Cdn legal academics and others to let me (sonia, slawrence at Osgoode dot yorku.ca) know if you’ve hired any new feminist colleagues this year, and a request that you suggest to them that they get ifls blog posts to their email inbox (via the box on the right of the webpage), and/or follow us on twitter @osgoodeifls and feel free to let us know if they’ve got new work coming out or other things to say.

thank you!