Tag Archives: TWU

Twitter Roundup for those who don't do Twitter: Opportunities, Tips, Cases, Law Schools….

speakupWith thanks to the wonderful people who tweet out these gems for me to collect, and a special note for the always interesting and now much more active site http://www.bloggingforequality.ca “run by a group of Law Professors from the University of Ottawa…to share information about equality-related news and initiatives here at the Faculty of Law and in the broader community, as well as to disseminate our research and views on current issues.”.  On twitter at @blogforequality.   Go and have a look.

Opportunities

Law Schools

Tools, Tricks, Tech

Gender Representation

Fiona de Londras ‏@fdelond2 Oct  See work of my colleague @erikarackley for much more on this // Lady Hale ‘disappointed’ at lack of female judges http://bbc.in/153YLTM 

LEAF National Breakfast in Toronto

Ont. HR Commission ‏@OntHumanRights9 Oct

October is Women’s History Month. Watch OHRC’s YouTube video about the first Black woman in parliament. #WHM http://bit.ly/1gmXN9Z 

Diversions?

David Cameron: ‘I am a feminist’ | Politics | The Guardian http://bit.ly/1e2yMyF  hmmm.

Conferences (past)

Gender&SexualityLaw ‏@GenderSexLaw5 Oct  Missed #queerdreams conference? Video of plenaries and audio of all panels is here: https://echo.law.columbia.edu:8443/ess/portal/section/c5c7d5ae-4bd9-4afc-94a1-42bc07c889a6 …

 

Caselaw & Controversy

ReValuingCareNetwork ‏@ReValuingCare8 Oct Gender abortion not illegal, says top prosecutor: Starmer says nothing in law prevents a woman… http://dailym.ai/15ifhzD  via @MailOnline

Court dismisses lawsuit over Arizona’s “race- and sex-selective” abortion ban http://bit.ly/GDFLDd 

Farrah Khan ‏@farrah_khan8 Oct  Afternoon read: SALCO report Who, If, When to Marry: The Incidence of Forced Marriage in Ontario http://buff.ly/1a8q3qI  #forcedmarriage

Kyle Kirkup ‏@kylekirkup7 Oct   “Transforming Sentencing? Gender Identity, Prisons, & Cdn Criminal Law” (my first contribution to @blogforequality): http://www.bloggingforequality.ca/2013/10/transforming-sentencing-gender-identity.html …

South Africa Constitutional Court Declares Portions of Statutory Rape Laws Unconstitutional http://flip.it/sMVvG 

Steph Guthrie (@amirightfolks) argues that online misogyny isn’t just deserving of a response–but rather demands one http://youtu.be/_KHEkR5yb9A Globe and Mail Series on Sexual Assault

Farrah Khan ‏@farrah_khan7 Oct  Important read re: how Canada’s sex-assault laws violate rape victims – The Globe and Mail http://buff.ly/GHHZRF   [Kirk Makin Article]

brenda cossman ‏@BrendaCossman8 Octmy thoughts on what’s wrong with sexual assault laws http://bit.ly/16PyzzP 

[Also in the series David Butt, Courts are Failing victims of Sex Assault: Here’s how to fix a broken system]

 

Thanksgiving

 ♥ students.Yesterday, listened to engaged talkative 1Ls on judges role in democracy. Today, fab ideas of #osgoode SJDcand @estair Thank You!

More on Trinity Western University's proposed Law School

For earlier posts on TWU, click here.

Ottawa law Profs Jena McGill, Angela Cameron & others wrote for the National Post… Why Trinity Western University should not have a law school.

The crux of the issue is how the discrimination and institutional environment at TWU impacts the ability of the school to teach law. In order to permit entry into a provincial or territorial law society (as determined by the Federation), the law degree program must meet national standards in its curriculum. Those standards require critical thinking about ethical and legal issues. No person can truly think critically from one pre-determined lens, in this case, a lens mandated by TWU.

The Post has otherwise been publishing a number of pieces arguing the other side.  Here, from Don Hutchinson vice-president and general legal counsel with The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, here, from NP Columnist Johnathan Kay and here a response to McGill, Cameron et al, from Barbara Kay.

 

 

NIP on SSRN from Elaine Craig: The Case against TWU's Law School [now updated, with letters]

[Update, thank you very much to Bev Baines of Queens, who sent along the (public) letters referred to below].

Elaine Craig (Dalhousie) (learn from her here, in a mini lecture on Understanding Sexual Assault Law) has posted The Case for the Federation of Law Societies Rejecting Trinity Western University’s Proposed Law Degree Program (forthcoming CJWL) to SSRN, here:

Should Canada have a law school that discriminates against gays and lesbians? Would the governing bodies of the legal profession in Canada approve a law school that prohibited mixed race sexual intimacy? Should a self-regulating legal profession require that the policies of the institutions that produce this country’s next generation of lawyers respect equality and academic freedom? Trinity Western University (TWU), a private Christian school in British Columbia is posed to become Canada’s first Christian law school. Trinity Western discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation in both its hiring and admissions policies. It has also been found to violate academic freedom.

Brief Background: Canada’s private Christian Universities, Trinity Western (perhaps familiar to you from British Columbia College of Teachers v TWU, 2001 SCC 31, here) has applied to open a law school, as this blog noted here.  See here for their announcement about the law school plan.

Last week, the Canadian Council of Law Deans wrote to the Federation of Law Societies of Canada opposing the new school, partly although not solely because the school prohibits students and faculty from engaging in homosexual behaviour, through a policy they ground in religion. [Addition: Here is the letter, excerpt below:

The covenant specifically contemplates that gay, lesbian or bisexual students may be subject to disciplinary measures including expulsion. This is a matter of great concern for all the members of the CCLD. Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is unlawful in Canada and fundamentally at odds with the core values of all Canadian law schools.
We would urge the Federation to investigate whether TWU’s covenant is inconsistent with federal or provincial law. We would also urge the Federation to consider this covenant and its intentionally discriminatory impact on gay, lesbian and bi-sexual students when evaluating TWU’s application to establish an approved common law program.

]

 

See link to Vancouver Sun story, since the letter does not appear to be available online). [Also provided via the intervention of Bev Baines, here is the reply from the Federation to the CCLD, excerpt below:

When my colleagues and I met with you in Kingston on November 9, 2012, we indicated that determinations of the Approval Committee would be referred to the law societies for consideration. On verification, we have determined that in fact the Implementation Committee Report makes clear that the mandate of the Approval Committee is to make the final determination on compliance for both existing and proposed law degree programs and to post its final report respecting each such program on the Federation website in accordance with the Implementation Committee Report. I regret any confusion we may have caused on this point.
The national requirement, approved by law societies, does not contemplate or authorize an inquiry into the admission philosophy of a law school program, either existing or new, or an investigation into whether the admission policies of an educational institution are consistent with federal or provincial law. The only reference to admissions policy in the national requirement pertains to the minimum number of years of post-secondary instruction required to be completed prior to entry to law school

TWU have asserted their right to exemption from provincial and federal law for religious reasons.  The Law Deans, let it be said, know the law.  Their concerns are beyond legality – one cannot just open up a law school here.  New law schools need to be approved by the Federation of Canadian Law Societies and the relevant provincial Ministry – more than just legality can go into that decision (see, for instance, this newspaper story about the approval of Lakehead’s new law school).

 

 

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