Tag Archives: reproductive rights

A storify re: Reclaiming our Narratives: Racial and Gender Profiling in Toronto

Storify just collects tweets, so you can use it to tell a story about an event or issue.  Here’s one I put together after attending this event, (you can see the event announcement here).
It was great. Congratulations to the organizers on a really well put together public event.  I met some really great women, learned a lot, had feelings and thoughts at the same time (!), wallowed in being one of the oldest people in the room.  Sometimes folks ask me, what’s up with the younger feminists, what are they reading, what are they doing, what are they thinking?  Here’s one piece of the answer.  Been to any really great events related to feminism and law lately? Want to post about them, even after the fact? About the experience of being there? Let me know.

-sonia

 

today Prof. Joanna Erdman, MacBain Chair at Dalhousie Law – "New Ideas in an Age-Old Field": Regulating Reproduction [room change]

2027

“New Ideas in an Age-Old Field”: Regulating Reproduction
Professor Joanna Erdman
MacBain Chair in Health Law & Policy, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University

Thursday October 25, 1230-2pm

Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2003 now in 2027 Faculty Lounge
Light Lunch Served, please RSVP to lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

Poster for emailing, printing, sharing, here.

 

suggested reading:

Reva Siegel, “The Constitutionalization of Abortion” in M. Rosenfeld & A. Sajó eds., The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law 1057-78 (2012).

 

Marie Ashe, “Zig-Zag Stitching and the Seamless Web: Thoughts on ‘Reproduction’ and the Law,” (1989) 13 Nova L. Rev. 355  (this is a hein online link and will require access to hein, e.g. through the York library system)


IFLS presents Prof. Joanna Erdman on October 25: "New Ideas in an Age-Old Field": Regulating Reproduction

“New Ideas in an Age-Old Field”: Regulating Reproduction
Professor Joanna Erdman
MacBain Chair in Health Law & Policy, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University

Thursday October 25, 1230-2pm

Osgoode Hall Law School IKB 2003
Light Lunch Served, please RSVP to lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

Poster for emailing, printing, sharing, here.

 

suggested reading:

Reva Siegel, “The Constitutionalization of Abortion” in M. Rosenfeld & A. Sajó eds., The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Constitutional Law 1057-78 (2012).

 

Marie Ashe, “Zig-Zag Stitching and the Seamless Web: Thoughts on ‘Reproduction’ and the Law,” (1989) 13 Nova L. Rev. 355  (this is a hein online link and will require access to hein, e.g. through the York library system)


a little something for "reading" week, via Jezebel

What Does Science Fiction Tell Us About the Future of Reproductive Rights? from Jezebel.

I cannot shake the raging disbelief I’m feeling about Virginia’s proposed legislation (sorry to anyone who has talked to me in the past 72 hours, I really cannot work through it on my own, and have to rant repeatedly, incredulously, loudly, and with TMI involved).

Luckily (and I’m sure because of some effective advocacy/ranting), it seems that not everyone has lost their minds (via Ms. Magazine) and the bill won’t become real law (now, at least) (via Jezebel).

But thinking about it and following the debate certainly did make me think of Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale specifically, and the unknowability of the future more generally.  And once you get to that point, “smug-canadianness” as a reaction to this kind of proposal feels terribly unsatisfying and unstable.

So, while many tactics on the anti-abortion front seem to be coming around again, or coming on stronger maybe, more inescapable, more stridently proposed, more everything, but ultimately forseeable (outright bans, permissions from family, fathers, doctors, funding withdrawals, etc), the technological possibilities involve many things which are less so. Mandatory transvaginal ultrasounds if you want an early abortion are one, as is the Texas law which tries to force women seeking abortion to listen to the fetal heartbeat (this law has survived legal challenges).  Another is the call to stop pregnancy termination where it is based in a desire to select the sex of a child (see this op-ed from the University of St. Michael’s College and E.D. of the Canadian Catholic Bioethics Institute Dr. Moira McQueen, for instance).  Hence, the turn to art and imagination to get a fuller picture of the possibilities as science moves boldy forward (other options include taking some scientists out for lunch to chat, but hey, it’s “Reading” week!).  Thanks, I think, Jezebel.

h/t Kate Sutherland, who blogs at Osgoode’s LawArtsCulture blog.  Note that films are included in the Jezebel post. Maybe for next week? For this week, read.

Sexual and Reproductive Rights Symposium (on tape and in print)

Harvard Journal of Law & Gender vol 34(2) Summer 2011

This volume includes several articles coming out of the Sexual and Reproductive Rights: Barriers to Access, and Roadmaps to Fulfillment 2911 Journal Symposium (proceedings on audio here).

The articles are listed below -including Joanna Erdman’s piece on a harm reduction/human rights approach to access to information on safe abortions.

 

Normalizing Sex and its Discontents: Establishing Sexual Rights in International Law
Mindy Jane Roseman & Alice M. Miller
313
Give Justice Ginsburg What She Wants: Using Sex Equality Arguments to Demand Examination of the Legitimacy of State Interests in Abortion Regulation
Priscilla J. Smith
377
Access to Information on Safe Abortion: A Harm Reduction and Human Rights Approach
Joanna N. Erdman
413
Beyond Religious Refusals: The Case for Protecting Health Care Workers’ Provision of Abortion Care
Steph Sterling & Jessica L. Waters
463
Capacity and Autonomy: A Thought Experiment on Minors’ Access to Assisted Reproductive Technology
Michele Goodwin & Naomi Duke
503
Article
The Constitution and Female-Initiated Divorce in Pakistan: Western Liberalism in Islamic Garb
Karin Carmit Yefet
553
Student Article
Abnormal Persons or Embedded Individuals?: Tracing the Development of Informed Consent Regulations for Abortion
Evelyn Atkinson