Tag Archives: LGBT

Feb 24 @ York: Envisioning LGBT Asylum in Canada: Is Canada a Safe Haven?

Centre for Refugee Studies seminar

Wednesday February 24, 2016, 11am-12:30pm

Room: 280N York Lanes

Envisioning LGBT Asylum in Canada: Is Canada a Safe Haven?

event poster Presentation of findings based on the various themes which emerged from the research regarding the experiences of LGBT refugee and asylum seekers populations to Toronto. The research is based on qualitative interviews and focus groups with the mentioned populations as well as service providers working in the resettlement sector. Additionally, the presentation will include recommendations Envisioning is calling for to address the numerous issues and concerns presented.

The report is available on-line at: http://envisioninglgbt.blogspot.ca/p/publicationsresources.html

Speakers: Nancy Nicol, Principle Investigator – Envisioning Global LGBT Human Rights;

Nick Mulé, Chairperson, Canada Research Team for Envisioning Global LGBT Human Rights;

Kathleen Gamble, PhD Student;

Junic Wambya, former ED of Freedom and Roam Uganda, forced to flee Uganda due to persecution. She was accepted as a protected person in Canada in 2014.

Co-sponsored by the Centre for Feminist Research.

*Please note this event counts towards seminar requirements for GFWS students

 

Twitter RoundUp

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After Mandela

‏@RobsonConLaw Daily Quote: Obama on Mandela and “Formal Equality” http://bit.ly/J1ixHK 

‏@gilliancalder tweeted this piece from Joanne St. Lewis: Beautiful. @blogforequality http://www.bloggingforequality.ca/2013/12/a-dignified-warrior-for-peace-nelson_8.html … @firing_control

LGBT* Rights around the Globe

Russia

Leckey (McGill) reviews Kondakov (http://bit.ly/1iLcbfQ ) Scholarship in a Violent Time http://bit.ly/18fSk3Q  #lgbt #Russia @IReadJotwell

 

India

@PoojaaParmar

  • good to know govt interested in “legislative route” http://goo.gl/1D6ag5 
  • SC says legislature free to remove/ amend s. 377 IPC. Will any political party take this up? National elections next year!!

 

That time again….

 

Get yr exam-time pistachio needs filled in IFLS/Nthnsn suite. 3rd fl. Exit elevator. Turn L. While supplies last! pic.twitter.com/qZl8eWwhfb

Also: a nice place to sit. #morethanjustpistachios pic.twitter.com/ekYHATPkXx

 — Sonia Lawrence (@OsgoodeIFLS) December 9, 2013 

timely! #exams RT @BeckyBatagol: This is great! RT@WellnessForLaw: Healthy Lawyer: Stress Management @msjdtweets http://ms-jd.org/healthy-lawyer-stress-management …

Legal Education in Canada

 

Critical Resources

Don’t reinvent the wheel.  Other smart folk have done some of the work for you

Women of note

 

Conferences etc.

Yale Law School ‏@YaleLawSch

The 2013 Doctoral Scholarship Conference will explore the relationship between law and uncertainty. Learn more: http://ylaw.us/1bKsC8u 

 

December 6

Thank you, Osgoode Feminist Collective for reminding & memorializing. #dec6 #weremember #vaw pic.twitter.com/w452anRoIL

 

 

 

 

Sexual Orientation and Aging: On the radio/in the journals/doc movies too

The CBC project SHIFT did a piece recently entitled “Back in the Closet”.  The reporters examined unique issues facing LGBT people as they age.  You can listen here.

I see now that Nancy Knauer of Temple University has just posted an article on SSRN entitled “Gen Silent: Advocating for LGBT Elders“.  It is forthcoming in the Journal of Elder Law. Abstract:

This article provides a general introduction to the specific challenges facing LGBT elders. In addition to the general burdens of aging, LGBT elders are disadvantaged by a number of LGBT-specific concerns, most notably: the legal fragility of their support systems, high levels of financial insecurity compounded by ineligibility for spousal benefits, and the continued prevalence of anti-LGBT bias on the part of their non-LGBT peers and service providers. Part I outlines the ways in which LGBT elders differ from their non-LGBT peers in terms of demographics and their reliance on “chosen family,” as well as some of the particular issues confronting transgender elders. Part II turns to two issues that loom large in the lives of LGBT elders: the closet and the constant threat of anti-LGBT bias. It contends that pre-Stonewall history continues to inform the behavior and beliefs of LGBT elders, and that the prevalence of anti-LGBT bias and violence distorts their view of the aging process. Part III discusses the extent to which LGBT elders can use traditional estate planning tools to safeguard their interests. A brief conclusion summarizes the types of reforms that are necessary to ensure dignity and equity in aging regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. It argues that the limitations of existing planning tools should serve as a powerful reminder that many elder law issues require a wider lens and that the reach of elder law ultimately extends well beyond the finer points of estate planning and the spousal impoverishment rules. Aging in the U.S. is first and foremost a civil rights issue that implicates fundamental issues of justices and fairness. In this regard, the isolation and fear experienced by LGBT elders should strike a universal chord, as should their call for dignity and equity in aging.

This isn’t Knauer’s first effort to talk about this issue.  See her faculty bio for links to pdf’s of other articles and the one I mention above.

You could also check out this doc, “A place to live: The story of Triangle Square“.