Tag Archives: judges

Sr. UK judge: Women should be given priority for top law jobs

Women should be given priority for top law jobs, says one of Britain’s most senior judges | Mail Online.

 

Master of the Rolls Lord Neuberger wants to use new legislation to favour female and minority candidates over white men if they are equally qualified for a role.

But the view is likely to be seen by critics as supporting illegal positive discrimination.

Meanwhile, here in Canada, we’re wigless, but more importantly, numbers of federal appointments of women are plummeting.  The Globe had a nice article, here and a  lovely infographic here,.

“If anything there is a larger pool of brilliant and exceptionally qualified women lawyers to draw upon since 2005,” Prof. Sheehy said. “If the current process of selection cannot deliver anything approaching a representative bench … then it is clear that something is broken.”

I’ve written about representation on the bench, (Reflections: On Judicial Diversity and Judicial Independence in this book) and I think it’s pretty clear that we have serious problems with judicial appointments which reflect the forms of discrimination which pervade our society.  The news that things are getting worse comes on top of the fact that things were not that great to begin with.

H/t IFLS member and Osgoode colleague Sara Slinn

@ Osgoode: Rachlinski on "Intuition, Deliberation and Good Judgment" 1230-230 September 29, 2011

September 29, Professor Jeffrey Rachlinski (Professor at Cornell University Law School): “Intuition, Deliberation and Good Judgment” 1230-230 September 29, 2011

Room 2003 Osgoode Hall Law School.  Click here for more information and how to RSVP (lunch is provided, but space is limited).

Professor Jeffrey Rachlinski from Cornell University Law School will give a lecture on how intuitive processes can adversely affect judgment in the courtroom, boardroom and beyond. The event is organized by the Hennick Centre for Business and Law and co-sponsored by the Ontario Legal Philosophy Partnership and the Canadian Forum on Civil Justice. It will be held at Osgoode Hall Law School on September 29th.

Professor Rachlinski has written many articles including a number looking at unconscious bias in trials, elections and other arenas.  For instance, Parks, Gregory Scott and Rachlinski , Jeffrey J., A Better Metric: The Role of Unconscious Race and Gender Bias in the 2008 Presidential Race (March 4, 2008). Cornell Legal Studies Research Paper No. 08-007.See all his SSRN publications here.

Rethinking Gender Equality … Media Coverage of [US] Supreme Court Nominees now on SSRN

Our project sits at the unique interdisciplinary intersection of law, gender studies, mass media, and political science.

Renee Knake and Hannah Brenner from Michigan State U College of Law have posted their interesting study on SSRN:

Rethinking Gender Equality in the Legal Profession’s Pipeline to Power: A Study on Media Coverage of Supreme Court Nominees Phase I, The Introduction Week by 

From the abstract:

“….women remain significantly under-represented in major leadership roles within the legal profession, where they face extensive gender bias and stereotyping. This gender bias and stereotyping is also leveraged against women who are featured in the media, illustrated most vividly by coverage of the most recent Supreme Court nominations. Headlines from mainstream news, “Then Comes the Marriage Question” in the New York Times or “The Supreme Court Needs More Mothers” in the Washington Post, and from the online blog arena, “Elena Kagan v. Sonia Sotomayor: Who Wore it Better?” in AbovetheLaw.com or “Put a Mom on the Court” in TheDailyBeast.com, are just a sampling…”

“This article presents results from the first phase of data analysis looking at the week following a president’s announcement of a nominee, and we report six preliminary findings. In identifying these findings, we assess the gendered portrayals of nominees to the Court, and we reflect upon how this knowledge might motivate the resolution of gender disparity in the legal profession’s pipeline to power”

 

Given that we’re coming up to some new “appointments” if not “nominations”, time seems ripe for a similar analysis here….

 


Video break: Courting Justice in SAfrica (thanks to FeministLawProfessors.com)

Link to Christine Corcos’s Feminist Law Professors post on this issue.   Her original post also offers an SSRN link to a paper reviewing Courting Justice, entitled Gender and the Judiciary in South Africa: A Review of the Documentary Film Courting Justice. Thank you Christine for pointing me to this deeply interesting film about South Africa, race, gender, and judging.

More on the film from Women Make Movies.

Courting Justice takes viewers behind the gowns and gavels to reveal the women who make up 18 percent of South Africa’s male-dominated judiciary. Hailing from diverse backgrounds and entrusted with enormous responsibilities, these pioneering women share with candor, and unexpected humor, accounts of their country’s transformation since apartheid, and the evolving demands of balancing their courts, country, and families.

Here is a link to a South African newspaper piece on the film.

Johannesburg Judge Mathilde Masipa believes that the changing profile of the Bench is increasing the legitimacy of the court. “In the past, people would stay away from the court and rather sort things out themselves. Now they see black people and women on the Bench and they say maybe, if you want justice, the high court is where you go.”