Tag Archives: Gillian Calder

Cunliffe Talk Follow Up: ReconciliationSyllabus blog on TRC Recommendation 28

In her powerful talk earlier this month about R v Barton and the death of Cindy Gladue, Professor Emma Cunliffe discussed the lack of cultural competency and respect for Indigenous lives shown by the lawyers involved in the case. She was later asked a question about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action regarding legal education. In her answer, she mentioned a recent blog post she had written on the subject, found here.

The blog she was talking about is called ReconciliationSyllabus. It was started by UVic law professors Gillian Calder and Rebecca Johnson last summer as “an invitation to law professors across Canada to gather together ideas about resources and pedagogies to support recommendation #28 of the TRC Calls to Action: the call for us to rethink both what and how we teach in our schools.” Here is a story about the blog’s origin.

The TRC Calls to Action that speak most directly to legal education read as follows:

  1. We call upon the Federation of Law Societies of Canada to ensure that lawyers receive appropriate cultural competency training, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal– Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and anti-racism.
  1. We call upon law schools in Canada to require all law students to take a course in Aboriginal people and the law, which includes the history and legacy of residential schools, the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Treaties and Aboriginal rights, Indigenous law, and Aboriginal–Crown relations. This will require skills-based training in intercultural competency, conflict resolution, human rights, and antiracism.

You can see all 94 Calls to Action here, and the entire TRC report can be found here.

Since the blog’s launch, Professor Cunliffe and several other Canadian law professors (many of a known feminist bent) have taken up the invitation to reflect on the TRC’s recommendations. Check it out here, if you haven’t already: https://reconciliationsyllabus.wordpress.com/about/.

Here are some further thoughts about the Calls to Action

from UVic Dean Jeremy Webber:

http://www.slaw.ca/2015/08/04/the-law-schools-and-the-future-of-indigenous-law-in-canada/

from Professors Gillian Calder and Rebecca Johnson:

http://www.canadianlawyermag.com/5620/TRC-offers-a-window-of-opportunity-for-legal-education.html

from Professor Lisa Kerr:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/law-schools-across-canada-debate-how-to-enact-trc-recommendations/article27775570/

Professor Cunliffe’s talk, and the question about the TRC serves as an important reminder not to let this conversation die. Only by carrying the momentum forward can the TRC’s Calls be lifted off the page and into action. Seems like we have a lot of work to do.

New in Print from UBC Press: Calder & Beaman, Polygamy's Rights and Wrongs

 

Click here for UBC press page

Gillian Calder (UVic) and Lori G. Beaman (UOttawa) Eds.

Polygamy’s Rights & Wrongs: Perspectives of Harm, Family, and Law 

Contents look really interesting – with a strong theme connecting them but quite diverse.    They are described in Lori Beaman’s introduction, “Is Polygamy Inherently Harmful?”, which, happily, you can read as a sample, here.  I hope your librarian is getting this (they may appreciate an email suggesting it).  Great cover design too!

 

1 Plus Ça Change … ? Bountiful’s Diverse and Durable Marriage Practices / Angela Campbell 

2 How Should Public Institutions Assess Religious Identity? The Case of Polygamy / Avigail Eisenberg 

3 Polygamy and the Predicament of Contemporary Criminal Law / Benjamin L. Berger 

4 Are They Not Us? A Personal Reflection on Polygamy / Arta Blanche Johnson 

5 Reflecting on Polygamy: What’s the Harm? / Rebecca Johnson 

6 Polygamy in the Parisian Banlieues: Debate and Discourse on the 2005 French Suburban Riots / Jennifer A. Selby 

7 Polygamy and Race-Thinking: A Genealogy / Margaret Denike 

8 Making Them Fit: The Australian National Census and Aboriginal Family Forms / Frances Morphy 

9 The Raids at Short Creek and Yearning for Zion Ranch and the Law of Unintended Consequences / Martha Bradley-Evans 

Conclusion: “To the Exclusion of All Others” — Polygamy, Monogamy, and the Legal Family in Canada / Gillian Calder