Tag Archives: feminist legal theory

Kathryn Abrams @ Osgoode Nov 4: “Undocumented Stories”

Don’t miss what is sure to be a fascinating talk by renowned feminist legal scholar Kathryn Abrams of Berkeley, coming up on Nov 4.  Co-hosted by the IFLS and Law Arts Culture.

“Undocumented Stories”
Talk by Katherine Abrams of Berkeley Law 
Wednesday November 4, 2015 
12:30-2pm
Rm 2027, Osgoode Hall (Keele campus) 

Event poster Kathryn Abrams is Herma Hill Kay Distinguished Professor of Law at UC-Berkeley. Her areas of expertise include feminist legal theory, law and social movements, constitutional law, and law and the emotions. Her widely-anthologized work has appeared in Yale Law Journal, Columbia Law Review, California Law Review, Law and Philosophy, and Nomos, among others. She is the editor of two special issues: “Witness” for Women’s Studies Quarterly (co-edited with Irene Kacandes, 2008) and “Legal Feminism Now,” for Issues in Legal Scholarship, 2011. Her current empirically-based project explores the legal consciousness of undocumented immigrants in the anti-immigrant state of Arizona. It analyzes the ways that narrative, tactical innovation, and emotion management have enabled undocumented immigrants to emerge as effective legal claims-makers under highly adverse political circumstances.

 Please also note that the IFLS socials scheduled for Wednesday October 28 and Wednesday November 25 are now cancelled.  The next social will take place on Friday, November 27 at 12:30-2:30, joined by Prof Susan Boyd of UBC. More details to come!

CFP: Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the 2016 LSA Annual Meeting in New Orleans

New Orleans themed face masks
CC image courtesy of David Ohmer on Flickr

For those thinking of attending the Law and Society Association’s Annual Meeting in New Orleans next June, take note! From the Planning Committee:

Call for Papers – Friday September 18th Deadline Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting New Orleans, June 2-5, 2016

Dear friends and colleagues,

We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in 2016.

Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: www.lawandsociety.org/NewOrleans2016/neworleans2016.html.

Within Law & Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is belonging, place, and visions of law and social change. We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.

A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject. Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a chair for the panel and a commentator for each individual paper. As a condition of participating as a panelist, you must also agree to serve as a chair or commentator for another panel or participant. We will of course take into account your scheduling and topic preferences to the degree possible.

The duties of a chair are to organize the panel logistically, including registering it online with the LSA, and moderating the panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before their upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for assigning commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter. The duties of a commentator are to read one paper and provide verbal comments as well as brief written (email is fine) comments.

If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please email an abstract or summary, along with your name and a title, to Jessica Clarke at jessicaclarke@umn.edu. There is no need to upload the document to the TWEN site this year. Note that LSA is imposing a new requirement that your summary be at least 1,000 words long. Although a shorter summary will suffice for our purposes, you will be required to upload a 1,000 word summary in advance of LSA’s deadline on

October 15. If you are already planning a LSA session with at least four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Jessica know.

In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion. If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please let us know. Please note that for roundtables, organizers are now required to provide a 500 word summary of the topic and the contributions they expect the proposed participants to make. Please also note that LSA rules limit you to participating only once as a paper panelist or roundtable participant.

Please submit all proposals by Friday, September 18. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. In the past, we have attempted to accommodate as many panelists as possible, but have been unable to accept all proposals. If we are unable to accept your proposal for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.

We hope you’ll join us in New Orleans to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.

Best,

LSA Planning Committee

Jessica Clarke
Jill Hasday
Jessica Knouse
Elizabeth Kukura
Seema Mohapatra
Marc Spindelman

 

CFP: Applied Feminism and Health conference March 2014 in Baltimore

h/t Jennifer Koshan. The webpage of the U Baltimore School of Law’s Center on Applied Feminism is here.

CALL FOR PAPERS: “APPLIED FEMINISM AND HEALTH”

The University of Baltimore School of Law’s Center on Applied Feminism seeks submissions for its Seventh Annual Feminist Legal Theory Conference.  This year’s theme is “Applied Feminism and Health.”  The conference will be held on March 6 and 7, 2014.  For more information about the conference, please visit law.ubalt.edu/caf.

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (or Obamacare) and renewed attacks on reproductive health in the United States, the time is right to consider the relationship between feminism and health across multiple dimensions.  This conference seeks to explore the intersections between feminist legal theory and physical, mental, public, and community health in the United States and abroad.  Papers might explore the following questions:  What impact has feminist legal theory had on women’s health policy and practice? How might feminist legal theory respond to the health challenges facing communities and individuals, as well as increase access to health care?  What sort of support should society and law provide to ensure good health?  How do law and feminist legal theory conceptualize the role of the state in relation to health rights and reproductive justice?  What are the links between health, feministlegal theory, and sports?  Are there rights to good health and what are their foundations?  How do health needs and conceptions of rights vary across cultural, economic, religious, and other identities?  What are the areas where health justice is needed and how might feminist legal theory help?

This conference will attempt to address these and other questions from the perspectives of activists, practitioners, and academics.  The conference will provide an opportunity for participants and audience members to exchange ideas about the current state of feminist legal theories.  We hope to deepen our understandings of how feminist legal theory relates to health and to move new insights into practice.  In addition, the conference is designed to provide presenters with the opportunity to gain feedback on their papers.

The conference will begin the afternoon of Thursday, March 6, 2014, with a workshop for conference participants.   This workshop will continue the annual tradition of involving all attendees as participants in an interactive discussion and reflection.   On Friday, March 7, 2014, the conference will continue with a day of presentations by legal academics, practitioners and activists regarding current scholarship and/or legal work that explores the application of feminist legal theory to issues involving health.   The conference will be open to the public and will feature a keynote speaker. Past keynote speakers have included Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, Dr. Maya Angelou, Gloria Steinem, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Sheryl WuDunn, and Senators Barbara Mikulski and Amy Klobuchar.

To submit a paper proposal, please submit an abstract by Friday, 5 p.m. on November1, 2013, to ubfeministconference@gmail.com.  It is essential that your abstract contain your full contact information, including an email, phone number, and mailing addres swhere you can be reached.  In the “Re”line, please state:  CAF Conference 2014.  Abstracts should be no longer than one page.  We will notify presenters of selected papers in mid-November. We anticipate being able to have twelve paper presenters during the conference on Friday, March 7, 2014. About half the presenter slots will be reserved for authors who commit to publishing in the symposium volume of the University of Baltimore Law Review.  Thus, please indicate at the bottom of your abstract whether you are submitting (1) solely to present, or (2) to present and publish in the symposium volume.  Authors who are interested in publishing in the Law Review will be strongly considered for publication.  Regardless of whether or not you are publishing in the symposium volume, all working drafts of papers will be due no later than February, 14, 2014.   Abstracts will be posted on the Center on Applied Feminism’s conference website to be shared with other participants and attendees.

We look forward to your submissions.  If you have further questions, please contact Prof. Michele Gilman at mgilman@ubalt.edu.

CFP: LSA 2014 Minneapolis: Law & Inequality (Feminist Legal Theory CRN)

vintage look poster for minneapolis, minnesotaIt is already (?!) time to get ready for next years mammoth (american) Law and Society meeting – 2014 is in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  Prince’s hometown! One of the most literate cities in the United States. More theatre seats per capita than any US city other than New York.  Some pretty amazing bookstores (this one, this one owned by Louise Erdich).  There are lakes in the city.  With food that looks amazing.  Not that you needed a reason, just some things the internet coughed up about Minneapolis.

The theme is Law & Inequalties – see below for the general call.  The feminist legal theory CRN (collaborative research network – see this post from 2012 “What’s a CRN?“) is one way to make LSA more human sized.  The FLT CRN will organize a series of linked panels – information about that below – thanks to Columbia JSD candidate Sarah Swan for sending it along.

NOTE THAT THE FLT CRN DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 18TH.  THAT IS THIS MONTH NOW, FOR THOSE OF YOU STILL IN DENIAL.

May 29 – June 1, 2014
Minneapolis Hilton Hotel
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Law and Inequalities: Global and Local

Recent decades have seen the persistence and growth of powerful inequalities within and between groups and within and among nations. The 2014 program theme returns to a question central to the Association’s founding:  the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities. The 2014 Program invites participants to explore and consider three questions:

  • How can Law and Society scholarship contribute to unearthing and understanding inequalities?
  • How can Law and Society scholarship contribute to the critical interrogation of discourses of equality and inequality and help to reveal what is at stake in these concepts?
  • What impact can we expect these scholarly contributions to have on the persistence of these inequalities and on public discourse about them?

See more on the theme

Click here for Law and Society Association website

 

Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network

at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting

Call for Papers – September 18 Deadline

Mary Tyler Moore opening credits (because it happens in Minneapolis) Minneapolis, May 29 – June 1, 2014

 

Dear friends and colleagues,

                                                                                              

We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in 2014.

 

Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: http://www.lawandsociety.org/minneapolis2014/Minneapolis2014.html.

 

Within Law & Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities.  We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.

 

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.

 

Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a commentator for each individual paper. A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject and will ask CRN members to volunteer to serve as chairs of each panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before the upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for recruiting commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter.

 

If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please submit a 400-500 word abstract, with your name and a title, on the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page (details provided below).If you would like to serve as a chair or a commentator for one of our panels, or if you are already planning a LSA session with four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Rachel Rebouche know (rebouche@temple.edu). In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion.  If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please let us know.

TWEN is an online resource administered by Westlaw. If you have access to Westlaw but haven’t yet registered for the TWEN page, signing up is easy:

 

If you have Westlaw OnePass as a faculty member, follow this link:

http://lawschool.westlaw.com/shared/courselink.asp?course=113601&lID=4%3D2, then click on the link to the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page.

 

Or, sign onto Westlaw, hit the tab on the top for “TWEN,” then click “Add Course,” and choose the “Feminist Legal Theory” CRN from the drop-down list of National TWEN Courses.

 

Once you arrive at the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page, look to the left hand margin and click on “Law & Society 2014 – Abstracts.”  If you do not have a Westlaw password, please email Seema Mohapatra at smohapatra@barry.edu and ask to be enrolled directly.

 

Please submit all proposals for paper presentations by Wednesday, September 18, 2013. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. If we cannot accept all proposals for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.

 

We hope you’ll join us in Minneapolis to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.

 

Best,

 

LSA Planning Committee

 

Francine Banner

Arianne Renan Barzila

Beth Burkstrand-Reid

Jessica Clarke

Alesha Durfee

Marie Failinger

Elizabeth Kukura

Kara Loewentheil

Seema Mohapatra

Dara Purvis

Rachel Rebouche

Sarah Swan

 

CFP/CRN January 2012 in Washington. Feminist Legal Theory

This looks very interesting – posted at Feminist Law Professors – how to join this new Collaborative Research Network.  They are holding meetings in conjunction with but not as part of the AALS,(Washington in early January) and as a CRN are linked to the Law and Society Association (see blurb on the FLT CRN here).  No bar to scholars at non AALS schools, therefore! Lovely.  If you’re at a Cdn law school and planning to attend, would you drop me (sonia lawrence, osgoode) a note? Thanks!

Click through for all details.

Invitation and Call for Papers: Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network, January 2012 | Feminist Law Professors.