Tag Archives: Feminist Friday

Feminist Friday March 3: “Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

The paper is linked below and a brief description provided.

Institute for Feminist Legal Studies Feminist Friday March 3 

1230-230 in Osgoode Hall Law School 2027  RSVP HERE: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

“Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

Vulnerability, Equality & Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law Professor Sheila R. Foster (Fordham Law) Friday March 3 1230-230 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School Ignat Kaneff Building http://bit.ly/RSVPOSGOODESheila R. Foster is University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She is also the faculty co-director of the Fordham Urban Law Center. She served as Vice Dean of the Law School from 2011-2014 and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from 2008-2011. Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on land use, environmental law, and antidiscrimination law. Her early work was dedicated to exploring the intersection of civil rights and environmental law, in a field called “environmental justice.” Her most recent work explores the legal and theoretical frameworks in which urban land use decisions are made. Land use scholars voted her article on Collective Action and the Urban Commons (Notre Dame Law Review, 2011) as one of the 5 best (out of 100) articles on land use published that year. Professor Foster is the recipient of two Ford Foundation grants for her on environmental justice and urban development. Professor Foster is also the coauthor of a recent groundbreaking casebook, Comparative Equality and Antidiscrimination Law: Cases, Codes, Constitutions and Commentary (Foundation Press, 2012). She has taught and conducted research internationally in Switzerland, Italy, France, England, Austria, Colombia, Panama, and Cuba.

In this paper and talk, Prof. Foster suggests that one way to “to better integrate equality norms into environmental decision making — is through the lens of vulnerability. From an equality standpoint, legal theorists have advanced vulnerability as an alternative to the limitations of anti discrimination law and as a more robust conception of the role of the state in protecting vulnerable populations. In the environmental context, social vulnerability analysis and metrics have long been employed to assess and address the ways that some subpopulations are more susceptible to the harms from climate change and environmental hazard events like hurricanes and floods. The use of vulnerability, either as a policy framework or as social science, has not been utilized much in the pollution context to capture the array of factors that shape the susceptibility of certain places and populations to disproportionate environmental hazard exposure. This limitation suggests that a fertile area of research is how to utilize vulnerability metrics in regulatory and legal analysis to better protect these populations and communities.”

All are welcome to join us for this talk.  Lunch will be available, so please do RSVP so that we can ensure sufficient quantity

 

Voice, Agency, Gendered Tropes: Grad Students work with Feminist Thought

I forgot to take pictures.  Too busy eating and listening.
Thanks to the three panelists, this Friday’s Feminist Friday was another classic set of seemingly unconnected scholarly projects which are twining themselves around each other in my mind.

OHLS PhD candidate Estair Van Wagner spoke about non owner claims in Ontario’s land use planning regimes.  Her work looks closely at the situation unfolding in Melancthon County, Ontario, where a U.S. based company has proposed a mega quarry on what was considered prime farmland.  Estair uses ideas from Davina Cooper, Sarah Keenan, and others to consider how property can be imagined as embedded in a web of relations.

Emily Rosser, from Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies, spoke about her work uncovering the theoretical underpinnings of Guatemala’s major truth and memory projects, exposing the ways in which the attention now paid to gendered violence in conditions of war and civil oppression may fail to challenge older notions of women as victims and objects in human rights discourse.   Here is an earlier piece of Emily’s work on Guatemala.

Using the work of Dr. Lamia Karim and others, Osgoode PhD candidate  Shanthi Senthe illustrated how microfinance models, whether run by major financial institutions or by NGO’s, either fail to provide access to credit for poor women, or provide such access but use gendered notions of honour and shame in order to secure repayment.  Since microfinance is not what many proponents claim it is (that is, fair and equal credit access for women) she argues, it should be regulated as banking is, rather than treated as something small, charitable and harmless which can operate without regulatory measures aimed at consumer protection.  Shanthi’s work focuses on building a model for regulation which aims to provide access to credit without reifying or relying on gendered inequities.
I hope that these women will forgive the extent to which I have no doubt mistated their work!  On the poster for the event you can see “their own words”.  Thanks to the presenters and the faithful audience for attending this last Feminist Friday of the year.  No more Fridays.  Tuesdays and Wednesdays, from here on in.  Hope to see you there!

Stop the MegaQuarry Sign

Feminist Friday Followup

Thanks to lovely Friday afternoon audience and wonderful colleagues who presented at today’s FF.  I ate too much antipasti + cookies + banana bread, so this attempt to fulfill my promise to send out links for those interested in following up the brief samples available may fall slightly short.

 

Associate Dean Professor Shelley Gavigan presented pieces of her Something Old, Something New: Re-Theorising Patriarchal Relations and Privatisation at the Outskirts of Family Law, a shortened reprise of her presentation at this Conference in Tel Aviv.  The paper is forthcoming in Theoretical Inquiries in Law, but isn’t publicly available at the moment. I will be sure to post/tweet when it becomes available, whether through SSRN or the Journal.   She spoke about a few very interesting cases, including A.A. v. B.B., 2007 ONCA 2.  She also mentioned Angela Campbell’s work collecting the “voices” of women from Bountiful B.C.’s polygamous community.  That work is available on SSRN here.

[blackbirdpie url=”http://twitter.com/#!/OsgoodeIFLS/statuses/129978399270776832″]

Professor Stephanie Ben Ishai showed us some great commercials, including the one below to open her presentation of Debtor Assistance and Debt Advice: The Role of the Canadian Credit Counselling Industry, co authored with Saul Schwartz of the Carleton School of Public Policy and Administration.  The full text is available here.

 

She also referenced former Osgoode colleague Prof. Iain Ramsay (now at Kent Law School) and his (very fun sounding) paper “Wannabe Wags and Credit Crunch Binges”: The Construction of Over-Indebtedness in the UK. In: Niemi, Johanna and Ramsay, Iain and Whitford, William, eds. Consumer Credit, Debt and Bankruptcy: Comparative and International Perspectives. Hart Publishing, Oxford. Click here for Osgoode Hall of York University Library listing, not available online.

Professor Carys Craig’s paper What’s Feminist About Open Access? A Relational Approach to Copyright in the Academy co authored with Rosemary Coombe and Joseph Turcotte, is available here, from the (open access) journal Feminists@Law – also from Kent Law School.

 

[blackbirdpie url=”http://twitter.com/#!/OsgoodeIFLS/statuses/129990631652212736″]

She mentioned that people could buy or otherwise read her book, so check out this post from earlier this year, wherein she introduces the book and provides a great set of links for those new to the topic (excerpt below).

Carys suggested these articles to those intrigued by the connections between feminist theory and copyright (or IP more generally).  Carys adores alliteration, so she described these as favourite/fundamental:
Malla Pollack. “Towards a Feminist Theory of the Public Domain, or The Gendered Scope of United States’ Copyrightable and Patentable Subject Matter” William & Mary J. of Women and the Law 12 (2006): 603. Link is to Hein Online (requires account – will likely work if you are accessing from a university IP address):

the public domain is feminine because it provides essential nourishment; it is the birthing and lactating mother. As one seed becomes a plant due to the fecundity of the earth goddess, so one human sprouts poems due to the fecundity of the public domain, the daemon, the muse.”

Says Carys, “A sure way to make upper year law students shift uneasily in their seats.”    Another must-read classic (and Canadian to boot): is Shelley Wright, A Feminist Exploration of the Legal Protection of Art, 7 Can. J. Women & L. 59 (1994).  (Another Hein Online link. Apologies, but (irony?) these articles are not available “openly”.)

Since two is too few, she offered these more recent pieces as well – true to her convictions, both of these links should open for everyone.

Ann Bartow, Fair Use and the Fairer Sex:  Gender, Feminism, and Copyright Law,  Am. UJ Gender Soc. Pol’y & L., 2006,

Greene, K.J. “Intellectual Property at the Intersection of Race and Gender: Lady Sings the Blues.” American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law. 16, no. 3 (2008): 365-385

 

Final words – thank you to @MelaynaM who “won” the job of livetweeting the event from @osgoodeifls through our contest, and thank you to the students, staff and faculty who came out and listened/participated.  Comments/thoughts/suggestions always welcome.

Reminder: TOMORROW Feminist Friday October 28, 130 to 330

Come and hear three of Osgoode’s feminist scholars discuss their latest work. See how feminism provides critical tools to researchers across divergent subject areas, broaden your general knowledge, pique your interest, and meet faculty and students. Also on offer: banana bread, cheese, cookies, coffee, tea.

Feminist Friday 28 October 2011

1:30 – 3:30  Osgoode Faculty Common Room 2027

Professor Shelley Gavigan
Something Old, Something New? Re-theorizing Patriarchal Relations and Privatization from the Outskirts of Family Law

Professor Carys Craig
What’s Feminist about Open Access? A Relational Approach to Copyright in the Academy†

Professor Stephanie Ben-Ishai
Debtor Assistance & Debt Advice: The Role of the Canadian Credit Counseling Industry*

 

The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode aims to create a “community of interest” for feminist faculty and students at the law school.
Other Events, New Books, News, Commentary http://ifls.osgoode.yorku.ca IFLS on Twitter @OsgoodeIFLS Questions? Please contact Lielle Gonsalves, Administrator of IFLS x55586

* (co-author Professor Saul Schwartz, Carleton School of Public Policy & Administration)
† (co authors Professor Rosemary Coombe & Joseph Turcotte – may attend)

Feminist Friday October 28, 130 to 330

Come and hear three of Osgoode’s feminist scholars discuss their latest work. See how feminism provides critical tools to researchers across divergent subject areas, broaden your general knowledge, pique your interest, and meet faculty and students. Also on offer: banana bread, cheese, cookies, coffee, tea.

Feminist Friday 28 October 2011

1:30 – 3:30  Osgoode Faculty Common Room 2027

Professor Shelley Gavigan
Something Old, Something New? Re-theorizing Patriarchal Relations and Privatization from the Outskirts of Family Law

Professor Carys Craig
What’s Feminist about Open Access? A Relational Approach to Copyright in the Academy†

Professor Stephanie Ben-Ishai
Debtor Assistance & Debt Advice: The Role of the Canadian Credit Counseling Industry*

 

The Institute for Feminist Legal Studies at Osgoode aims to create a “community of interest” for feminist faculty and students at the law school.
Other Events, New Books, News, Commentary http://ifls.osgoode.yorku.ca IFLS on Twitter @OsgoodeIFLS Questions? Please contact Lielle Gonsalves, Administrator of IFLS x55586

* (co-author Professor Saul Schwartz, Carleton School of Public Policy & Administration)
† (co authors Professor Rosemary Coombe & Joseph Turcotte – may attend)