Tag Archives: equality

Feminist Friday March 3: “Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

The paper is linked below and a brief description provided.

Institute for Feminist Legal Studies Feminist Friday March 3 

1230-230 in Osgoode Hall Law School 2027  RSVP HERE: www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

“Vulnerability, Equality and Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law” Professor Sheila Foster,

Vulnerability, Equality & Environmental Justice: The Potential and Limits of Law Professor Sheila R. Foster (Fordham Law) Friday March 3 1230-230 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School Ignat Kaneff Building http://bit.ly/RSVPOSGOODESheila R. Foster is University Professor and the Albert A. Walsh Professor of Real Estate, Land Use and Property Law at Fordham University. She is also the faculty co-director of the Fordham Urban Law Center. She served as Vice Dean of the Law School from 2011-2014 and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from 2008-2011. Professor Foster is the author of numerous publications on land use, environmental law, and antidiscrimination law. Her early work was dedicated to exploring the intersection of civil rights and environmental law, in a field called “environmental justice.” Her most recent work explores the legal and theoretical frameworks in which urban land use decisions are made. Land use scholars voted her article on Collective Action and the Urban Commons (Notre Dame Law Review, 2011) as one of the 5 best (out of 100) articles on land use published that year. Professor Foster is the recipient of two Ford Foundation grants for her on environmental justice and urban development. Professor Foster is also the coauthor of a recent groundbreaking casebook, Comparative Equality and Antidiscrimination Law: Cases, Codes, Constitutions and Commentary (Foundation Press, 2012). She has taught and conducted research internationally in Switzerland, Italy, France, England, Austria, Colombia, Panama, and Cuba.

In this paper and talk, Prof. Foster suggests that one way to “to better integrate equality norms into environmental decision making — is through the lens of vulnerability. From an equality standpoint, legal theorists have advanced vulnerability as an alternative to the limitations of anti discrimination law and as a more robust conception of the role of the state in protecting vulnerable populations. In the environmental context, social vulnerability analysis and metrics have long been employed to assess and address the ways that some subpopulations are more susceptible to the harms from climate change and environmental hazard events like hurricanes and floods. The use of vulnerability, either as a policy framework or as social science, has not been utilized much in the pollution context to capture the array of factors that shape the susceptibility of certain places and populations to disproportionate environmental hazard exposure. This limitation suggests that a fertile area of research is how to utilize vulnerability metrics in regulatory and legal analysis to better protect these populations and communities.”

All are welcome to join us for this talk.  Lunch will be available, so please do RSVP so that we can ensure sufficient quantity

 

This is how you build a movement: CAMWL invites us to go Beyond the Niqab

The Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law has had a lot to respond to of late.  Here’s their most recent – a list of 8 actions we can take to support women’s equality.  Follow them on twitter at @camwlnews.

Do you think it’s unacceptable to deny women citizenship because of what they wear? Do you think the endless debates about women’s clothing are a distraction from the real issues we should be talking about this election season and every day? If you answered yes, you are part of a large, strong, and diverse community […]

Source: Beyond the Niqab: 8 Ways You Can Improve Women’s Equality in Canada – Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law

We can do more than just voting.

Incidentally, can I call attention to the way that CAMWL put in #4 and #6

4. Condemn police racial profiling, which disproportionately targets Black and other racialized communities in Canada.

6. Demand Canada investigate and end the crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, of whom there are thousands, to say nothing of the countless Indigenous people killed and scarred by residential schools, disproportionate incarceration, and systemic dispossession.

and nehiyaw educator Tasha Spillett‘s article for CBC the other week?

When I heard the words “barbaric cultural practices” fall from the mouth of Conservative candidate Kellie Leitch late last week, I instinctively wanted to pick up the phone. Not to report on practices at variance with this narrow conception of “Canadian values,” but because I felt a searing urgency to check-in with my sisters.

….

That said, it wasn’t the women from my own indigenous community that drew my concern following Leitch’s election broadcast. It was, instead, a grave worry for the well-being of my Muslim sisters, their families and their communities.

There are more of these moments. They build and break my heart, to see communities reaching out to each other despite their own tough times, to see these connections recognized and forged.   This is how we will build our movement.

 

Feb 28-March 1 in Kingston: Feminist Legal Studies Queen's presents Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law & Justice in Development and Equality

This picture of a woman's hand holding an ulu is taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 - the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives CanadaArctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality: In celebration of Dr. Patricia A. Monture

Click here for FLSQ queens page for this workshop

via Prof. Kathy Lahey (Kingston) with a reminder that students will have free registration, daytime meals, and a break on the dinner price as well.

Jan. 31, 2014 draft

FLSQ Program: Arctic/Northern Women

Friday, Feb. 28, 2014
11:30 Registration – Robert Sutherland Hall, Policy Studies room 202 – light lunch

12:30 Welcome and introduction to conference themes

Janice Hill, Four Directions Student Centre, Queen’s University
[Elder]

Åsa Gunnarsson, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå
University, Sweden

1:00 Keynote address: Eva-Maria Svensson, Gothenburg and Tromso
Universities, Principal’s Development Fund International Visitor –
‘Approaches to Gender Equality in Regional Governance of the Arctic Region’

2:20 Break

2:35 Panel I Governance and Voice: Indigenous Peoples, Women,
Climate, and Corporations

Tahnee Prior, Global Governance Program, Balsillie School of International
Affairs, University of Waterloo — ‘The Rights and Role of Indigenous Women
in Climate Change Regulation’

Vrinda Narain, Faculty of Law and Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and
Feminist Studies, McGill University – ‘Postcolonial Constitutionalism:
Complexities and Contradictions’

Kathleen Lahey, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University – ‘Gender, Indigenous
Peoples, and the Paradox of Plenty in Resource Rich Regions’

4:00 Panel II Appropriations and Dependencies: Women and Earnings,
Livelihoods, Knowledges, and Aging in Arctic Regions

Elena Kotyrlo, Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, Sweden – ‘Earnings
and Labor Force Participation of Native and Immigrant Women in
Vasterbotten and Norrbotten’

Shahnaj Begum, University of Lapland, Rovaniemi, Finland – ‘Livelihood
Transformation in the Arctic: Effects on Older People from a Gender-based
Perspective with a Special Focus on Finnish Lapland’
Lena Wennberg, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå
University – ‘Women and Aging in the Arctic Region’

Bita Amani, Faculty of Law, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario –
‘Restitution, Repatriation, and Resistance: Reframing the Biopiracy Dialogue
toward Women’s Work and Traditional Indigenous Knowledge’

5:30 Cash bar
6:00 Dinner

7:30 Celebrating Patricia Monture – Her Legacy in Activism and Learning

Kim Pate, Canadian Association of EFrye Societies and University of Ottawa –
‘Canada Corrections and Marginalized Women – Trish Monture’s Legacies’

Rakhi Ruparelia, University of Ottawa – ‘Legal Feminism and the Post-Racism
Fantasy’

Saturday, March 1, 2014

8:30 Registration

9:00 Keynote Address: Rauna Kuokkanen, Department of Political Science and
Aboriginal Studies Program, University of Toronto – ‘Indigenous Economies,
Self-Determination, and Women’s Rights’

10:20 Break

10.35 Panel III Women and Economic Development: Roadmaps and
Strategies

Louise Langevin, Faculty of Law, Laval University – ‘Gender-based Analysis of
Discrimination against Women – ‘Economic Development and Women’s
Bargaining Power’

Kate McInturff, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives – ‘Gender Equality
and Women in the Arctic: Mapping the Future’

Gail Baikie, Faculty of Social Work, Dalhousie University – ‘Rhetoric and
Realities: The Mokami Status of Women Council’s Environmental Assessment
Submission’

12:00 Lunch

1:00 Panel IV Gendered Dislocations, Ruptures, and Violences

Hege Brækhus, University of Tromsø, Norway – ‘International Marriages:
Russian Women Marrying Norwegian Men’

Rachel Kohut, Arctic Institute, Montreal – ‘Imagining Birth Dislocated from
Medicine: The Interconnectedness of the State and the Birthing Process
in Canada’s North’

Monica Burman, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå
University – ‘Men’s Violence against Sami Women — A blind Swedish Spot’

Cindy Hanson, Adult Education/HRD, University of Regina, Saskatchewan –
‘Gender Lens on the Indian Residential School Claims Process’

3:00 Break

3:30 Panel V Arctic/Northern Prostitution and Sex Trafficking

Marguerite Russell, Barrister and Solicitor (Ont. and UK) – ‘Trafficking in
Women: International Legal Perspectives’

Victoria Sweet, Michigan State University College of Law – ‘Rising Waters,
Rising Threats: Human Trafficking and Other Gender-Related Crimes
in the Circumpolar Region of the United States and Canada’

Åsa Yttergren, Umeå Forum for Studies on Law and Society, Umeå University
– ‘Prostitution and Trafficking in the North of Sweden – The “Swedish Model”
in Action’

4:45 Closing discussion: publication and followup plans

The picture is of a woman’s hand holding an ulu.  The full picture can be seen at the source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 – the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives Canada.   An ulu is a “woman’s knife” ᐅᓗ.

Women use all kinds of tools, of course.  Have you seen this website – Feeding my Family ?  An eyeopener about food security in the North.  See also 15 Sw. J. Int’l L. 223 (2008-2009)
Northern Frontier, Northern Homeland: Inuit People’s Food Security in the Age of Climate Change and Arctic Melting by the University of Ottawa’s Sophie Theriault. Click here for access via Hein online (not open access),  Another article to consider is Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez (U of A) Nunavut: Whose Homeland, Whose Voices? Canadian Woman Studies26.3/4 (Winter/Spring 2008): 128-134 (also not available open access – try  via ProQuest if you have access to the database through your institution.

CFP: Feminist Legal Studies Queen's presents Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law & Justice in Development and Equality

This picture of a woman's hand holding an ulu is taken from http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 - the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives CanadaFeminist Legal Studies Queen’s (Profs Kathleen Lahey & Bita Amani) has put out a really interesting call for papers, “Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality: In celebration of Dr. Patricia A. Monture“.  Proposals can be submitted up to October 4, 2013.

The picture is of a woman’s hand holding an ulu.  The full picture can be seen at the source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lac-bac/6347653013/in/set-72157628135696830 – the Flickr stream of the Rosemary Gillat Fonds held by Library and Archives Canada.   An ulu is a “woman’s knife” ᐅᓗ.

Women use all kinds of tools, of course.  Have you seen this website – Feeding my Family ?  An eyeopener about food security in the North.  See also 15 Sw. J. Int’l L. 223 (2008-2009)
Northern Frontier, Northern Homeland: Inuit People’s Food Security in the Age of Climate Change and Arctic Melting by the University of Ottawa’s Sophie Theriault. Click here for access via Hein online (not open access),  Another article to consider is Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez (U of A) Nunavut: Whose Homeland, Whose Voices? Canadian Woman Studies26.3/4 (Winter/Spring 2008): 128-134 (also not available open access – try  via ProQuest if you have access to the database).

 

Arctic/Northern Women: Situating Law and Justice in Development and Equality:  In celebration of Dr. Patricia A. Monture (1958-2010)

Feb. 28-March 1, 2014 in Kingston, Ontario

 

Arctic and northern regions of the globe are undergoing rapid climate, economic, and social changes. This conference will focus on how these changes affect women’s legal, economic, and social status with particular reference to challenges facing indigenous, northern, racialized, and immigrant women. Relevant legal frameworks include international human rights, including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women; constitutional provisions, including the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982; and domestic laws and policies. This conference is designed to accelerate access to legal and policy research concerning Arctic/northern women, people affected by changes occurring in and as the result of policies in circumpolar states, and proposals for governance and policy reforms.

 

This conference is convened in celebration of the life and work of Dr. Patricia A. Monture, Queen’s Law 1988, Hon. LL.D. (Athabaska and Queen’s), a fierce and proud Haudenosaunee woman who graced the Queen’s and Kingston communities with her tireless teachings as she confronted the realities of racism, colonialism, and Aboriginal existences. For those who wish to address the many challenges and contributions made by Dr. Monture in her work and activism, please see Malinda Smith, ‘Thunder in her soul,’ at http://www.idees-ideas.ca/blog/thunder-her-soul-remembering-patricia-monturex.

 

FLSQ invites academic and practicing lawyers, policy analysts, interdisciplinary and comparative scholars and experts, students in law and other disciplines, community members, and those involved in research and governance to submit proposals for papers that examine issues relevant to this broad area of engagement.

Proposals are invited on the following topics, as well as on others proposed in response to this call for papers:

  • First Nations, Inuit, and Metis women, indigenous women in other regions
  • The ‘paradox of plenty’ and nonrenewable resource extraction
  • Traditional economies and reciprocal relationships
  • Self-governance and political agency
  • Environmental issues, including human and ecological degradation, settlements, and human health
  • Fiscal policies and tax jurisdictions
  • Legal education and legal needs of indigenous and northern women
  • Commons, users, and concepts of property, including traditional knowledges
  • Science, nation building, and militarization in circumpolar states
  • Food, shelter, and wellbeing in northern regions
  • State systems and policy options
  • Demographics of northern and extractive regions
  • Sexual assault, trafficking, and violence
  • Globalization and interstate politics
  • Corporate governance
  • De/re/neo/colonizations
  • Economic development and social inequalities
  • Public services and accountability
  • Maternal and reproductive health
  • International human rights
  • Reproductive health and genetics
  • Law and policy reform related to any of these substantive topics, based on doctrinal, theoretical, empirical, comparative, or interdisciplinary approaches

 

Call for papers:

Submissions grounded in Aboriginal studies, domestic or international law, public policy, social anthropology, history, sociology, economics, philosophy, women’s/gender studies, human rights, or political studies are sought.

 

Date and Location:  The conference will be held at the Faculty of Law building, Macdonald Hall, 128 Union St., Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario on Friday Feb. 28 and Saturday March 1, 2014.

 

Submitting paper proposals:

If you are interested in presenting a paper or organizing a panel on a specific issue, please email a short outline of your proposal (a paragraph in length) to Kathleen Lahey (at kal2@queensu.ca) or Bita Amani (at amanib@queensu.ca).  A proposal may be made at any time until October 4, 2013.  Participation will be confirmed in November 2013.

 

Travel funding:

When submitting a paper or panel proposal, please indicate whether you would be able to obtain institutional support to attend, or whether you could attend only if you receive funding from Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s.

 

Registration:

Attendance without presenting a paper is welcome, as the goal is to discuss a wide variety of equality and justice issues. Contact the organizers to indicate interest and obtain registration information. Some funding is available to assist students to attend. Registration will open on November 15.

 

 

Accommodation and childcare:

Information on accommodation will be provided on request. Anyone wanting childcare should mention this request so appropriate arrangements can be made.

 

For further information please contact:

 

Prof. Kathleen Lahey                                                  Prof. Bita Amani

Co-Director                                                                 Co-Director

Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s                                 Feminist Legal Studies Queen’s

Faculty of Law, Queen’s University                          Faculty of Law, Queen’s University

Kingston, Ontario                                                       Kingston, Ontario

kal2@queensu.ca                                                        amanib@queensu.ca

 

 

 

Robson reviews Andrews at Jotwell: The Global Problem of Women`s Equality

cover of book linking to publishers siteFind Ruthann Robson’s review of (Albany Law Dean) Penelope Andrews’ “From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights” on Jotwell, here.

At its most hopeful, Andrews’ book presents the struggle for equality in South Africa as it was mounted against the Apartheid state, resulting in a new constitutional regime devoted to transformative law and politics. Andrews attributes the fact that this transformation included gender equality to a confluence of forces, but most importantly women’s participation. She suggests that the path chosen by South Africa is a model for many other nations, stressing that the involvement of women at all levels and phases is vital.

Find other papers by Andrews here (SSRN: open source).  Warning: you`ll want to read any you haven`t already.

Consider speaking to your librarian to request that they order books which interest you, if you don’t already.