Tag Archives: environment

Discussion IS YOUR BODY A TOXIC SITE? reproductive health as an environmental issue

Osgoode (and FES) colleague Dayna Nadine Scott, editor of the recent “Our Chemical Selves”, will be a panellist at this evening of discussion hosted by the Politics of Evidence Working GroupHow is human reproductive health affected by everyday encounters with a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors? This evening’s discussion will explore what we know about the endocrine disrupting chemicals in our waters, air, and consumer products, and our relationship to science, government, industry and environmentalism. What does the research tell us? How are they regulated here in Canada? WHY DON’T WE KNOW MORE? IS YOUR BODY A TOXIC SITE? reproductive health as an environmental issue AN EVENING OF DISCUSSION THE POLITICS OF EVIDENCE WORKING GROUP PRESENTS: WHEN Friday, May 15, 2015 WHERE University of Toronto, Emmanuel College, Rm 001 75 Queen’s Park Crescent TIME 7pm. Doors open at 6pm ADMISSION Free Space is Limited. Please register at: www.environmentaldefence.ca/panel Join scientist Dr. Miriam Diamond, lawyer Dr. Dayna Scott, and science studies scholar Dr. Michelle Murphy to discuss the current debates surrounding our exposure to endocrine disruptors and what you can do to change it. IN PARTNERSHIP WITH Dr. Miriam Diamond Dr. Michelle Murphy Dr. Dayna Scott

May 15 7PM (link with more information and registration)

How is human reproductive health affected by everyday  encounters with a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors? This evening’s discussion will explore what we know about the endocrine disrupting chemicals in our waters, air, and consumer products, and our relationship to science, government, industry and environmentalism. What does the research tell us? How are they regulated here in Canada?

WHY DON’T WE KNOW MORE?

 

PDF poster for Sharing/printing

 

cover image for Our Chemical Selves 2015 UBC Press Dayna Nadine Scott ed

 

one Conference (Environmental Justice) + one CFP (Race, Migration…)

November 8 – 10 2012: “Environmental Justice and Human Rights: Investigating the Tensions, Exploring the Possibilities”

Can indigenous peoples, ethnic minorities, women and people living in poverty mobilize human rights in a positive way to combat environmental problems that affect their health and their physical, psychological and material well-being? How does the human rights system increase the capacity of marginalized groups to defend and protect themselves in decision-making processes that could jeopardize their interests in relation to the environment?

Program , registration info and call for volunteers here: via Environmental Justice and Human Rights: Investigating the Tensions, Exploring the Possibilities | Human Rights Research and Education Center/Le Centre de recherche et d’enseignement sur les droits de la personne.

h/t osgoode’s own Dayna Scott, who is on the program to talk pipelines.

 

 

Race, Migration, Citizenship: Postcolonial and Decolonial Perspectives (December 14, 2012) Theme: Race, Migration, Citizenship: Postcolonial and Decolonial Perspectives Type: International Conference Institution: Department of Sociology, University of Warwick Birmingham and Midland Institute Location: Birmingham (United Kingdom) Date: 4.–5.7.2012 Deadline: 14.12.2012 Against the backdrop of decolonisation, a global economic boom was accompanied by tightened border controls, ever more punitive asylum regimes and limited access to citizenship. Immigration from former colonies to former metropoles has been limited in the postcolonial period as racialised discourses have set the West in opposition to an alien ‘rest’. Now, in this ‘age of austerity’, the strength of the old powers is weakening as other parts of the world, the so called ‘BRICs’, grow in strength. Yet the old racial hierarchies appear stubbornly resonant within Europe and the white settler colonies and other hierarchies, for example around caste, are increasingly coming to the fore in other countries. Foregrounding postcolonial and decolonial perspectives, this conference will provide a forum in which to discuss the context for emerging patterns of exclusion, for asking what the conditions for political equality might be, and for posing the question “what has ‘race’ got to do with migration and citizenship?” among many others.

 

Abstracts of no more than 200 words are welcomed from across the social scences and humanities on the following themes: 1. Race, Racism, and Prejudice 2. Racial and Colonial Institutional Orders 3. Modernity/Coloniality and Global (In)justice 4. Asylum after Empire 5. Cosmopolitan Citizens and Multicultural Societies: The New Crisis of Europe 6. Europe and Africa. Citizenship and the Legacies of Colonialism 7. Diaspora, Colonialism, and Postcolonialism Send your abstracts to rrmc2013@live.co.uk Deadline for abstracts: 14th December 2012 Contact: Gurminder K. Bhambra and Lucy Mayblin Phone: +44 121 236-3591 Email: rrmc2013@live.co.uk Web: http://rmcconference.wordpress.com

 

Living Downstream: Nov.10 Film Screening @ York

The National Network on Environments and Women’s Health invites you to a public screening of the film, “Living Downstream”, taking place on the campus of York University on Wednesday, November 10 at 4:15 pm.  Location: York University Keele Campus Rm T1009, TEL Building, main floor (map – you want building 39)

The film, by Chanda Chevannes, is a production of Toronto-based People’s Picture Company Inc. and is based on the acclaimed book of the same name by ecologist and cancer survivor Sandra Steingraber. The documentary follows Sandra during one pivotal year as she travels across North America, working to break the silence about cancer and its environmental links. You can watch a trailer for the film at: http://www.livingdownstream.com/trailer.php

Following the film we will have a panel discussion touching on some of the issues raised in the film and inviting audience feedback.

Moderator:
Prof. Sonia Lawrence, Director, Institute for Feminist Legal Studies/Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
Panelists:
Ellen Sweeney, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University
Anna Tilman, International Institute of Concern for Public Health

Pdf posters for distribution here: living_downstream B&W living_downstream colour

Anne Rochon Ford (author of  The Push to Prescribe) and my Osgoode colleague Dayna N. Scott are the Co-Directors of the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health at York University.

2008 Critical Perspectives on Environment and Women’s Health Workshop Co sponsored by IFLS and National Network on Environments and Women's Health

Supported by the National Network on Environment and Women’s Health (NNEWH), a Center of Excellence located at York University, this interdisciplinary workshop sought to engage with contemporary ideas around environmental health and justice.

“As feminists, activists and scholars we are committed to a social determinants of health model, which allows for an analysis of the complex ways in which environments produce and reproduce the conditions that create disparities in health. We are interested in exploring and deconstructing conceptions of nature, motherhood, ecologies and health as articulated within mainstream environmental discourses.

“We are seeking to overcome the tendency towards fragmentation of social movements, and to foster environmental justice organizing that takes account of gender, sexuality, race, citizenship and dis/ability in a way that is inclusive and that meaningfully accounts for difference.

Participant List

ANNE BLOOM Associate Professor of Law at the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law

PASCALE FOURNIER Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa and an associate at the university’s Human Rights Research and Education Centre (HRREC)

LOCHLANN JAIN

Assistant Professor of Cultural and Social Anthropology at Stanford University.

ARYN MARTIN Assistant Professor at the Department of Sociology and Program in Science & Technology Studies at York University.

STU MARVEL (Osgoode PhD candidate)

ROXANNE MYKITIUK Associate Professor of Law at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

DAYNA NADINE SCOTT Assistant Professor Osgoode Hall, cross-appointed with the Faculty of Environmental Studies

RACHEL STEIN professor of English and director of Women’s and Multicultural Studies at Siena College in New York.

NOËL STURGEON Chair and Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Graduate Faculty in American Studies at Washington State University

CHERYL TEELUCKSINGH Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology at Ryerson University

This workshop inspired an article recently published by Prof. Dayna Scott (Osgoode) a co director of the NNEWH

Gender Benders: Sex and Law in the constitution of polluted bodies.  Feminist Legal Studies (2009) 17: 241

Springerlink to article (requires authorized access)