Tag Archives: Book Launch

Dressing Constitutionally: Ruthann Robson Book launch and talk, September 23

Poster for talk by Ruthann Robson, CUNY. Dressing Constitutionally. September 23 1230. IKB 2027 Please RSVP as lunch will be served and space is limited to lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

Book Launch and Talk by Professor Ruthann Robson, University Distinguished Professor, CUNY School of Law

Dressing Constitutionally: Hierarchy, Sexuality and Democracy

September 23 1230 Osgoode Hall 2027

Please RSVP – lunch will be served and space is limited:  lgonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

We will have copies of the newly published Dressing Constitutionally on hand for purchase, thanks to the Yorku Bookstore.

Check out Professor Robson’s blog on the subject of Dressing Constitutionally, here.

Or you can see the publisher’s page on the book, here or you can hear Professor Robson speaking on NPR about the book, here.

Perhaps all those ORs should have been ANDs – you can also follow @robsonconlaw on twitter, AND you can check out her writing outside legal scholarship via her website, here.

 

Join us.

 

pdf poster for sharing here

poster design by the talented Ugochi Umeugo, check out her work/find her contact info here: http://ugochiumeugo.designbinder.com/

NIP: Constitutional Labour Rights in Canada: Farm Workers and the Fraser Case :: Irwin Law Inc.

Join in at the launch of Constitutional Labour Rights in Canada: Farm Workers and the Fraser Case, edited by Professor Eric Tucker (Osgoode), Judy Fudge (UVic) and Fay Faraday (Osgoode adjunct, equality/labour law specialist).

The Fraser case 2011 SCC 20, which “inspired” the collection, is here.

Sponsored by the Canadian Foundation for Labour Rights.

Sheridan Centre Hotel Conference Room F (Mezzanine Level) 123 Queen Street West, Toronto Thursday, April 12th, 2012 4:00 – 6:00 pm 

Please RSVP to: etucker@osgoode.yorku.ca

You can pre-order the book from Irwin law here: Constitutional Labour Rights in Canada: Farm Workers and the Fraser Case

and here is the table of contents:

Contents

Preface  

Chapter One
Introduction: Farm Workers, Collective Bargaining Rights, and the Meaning of Constitutional Protection
Judy Fudge

Chapter Two
Farm Worker Exceptionalism: Past, Present, and the post-Fraser Future  

Eric Tucker

Chapter Three
The Roots of Organizing Agriculture Workers in Canada
Wayne Hanley

Chapter Four
Development as Remittances or Development as Freedom? Exploring Canada’s Temporary Migration Programs from a Rights-based Approach
Kerry Preibisch

Chapter Five
Envisioning Equality: Analogous Grounds and Farm Workers’ Experience of Discrimination
Fay Faraday

Chapter Six
Harvest Pilgrims: Migrant Farm Workers in Ontario
Vincenzo Pietropaolo

Chapter Seven
The Fraser Case: A Wrong Turn in a Fog of Judicial Deference
Paul JJ Cavalluzzo

Chapter Eight
What Fraser Means For Labour Rights in Canada
Steven Barrett and Ethan Poskanzer

Chapter Nine
Labour Rights: A Democratic Counterweight to Growing Income Inequality in Canada
Derek Fudge

Chapter Ten
The International Constitution
Patrick Macklem

Chapter Eleven
Giving Life to the ILO —Two Cheers for the SCC
KD Ewing and John Hendy, QC

 

 

Friday March 23 Book Launch: Reconsidering Knowledge: Feminism and the Academy, ++

Meg Luxton and Mary Jane Mossman (eds) will launch this IFLS/CFR sponsored collection tomorrow March 23, 2012, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.  FSCR (Founders 305) at York University.  This book “examines current ideas about feminism in relation to knowledge, education and society, and the future potential for feminist research and teaching in the university context.” Click on the image to order through Fernwood.

Contents of Reconsidering Knowledge: Introduction (Mary Jane Mossman and Meg Luxton) • Part One: Feminism and the Academy: Revealing the “Other” • Feminism and the Academy: Transforming Knowledge? (Meg Luxton) • Cartographies of Knowledge and Power: Transnational Feminism as Radical Praxis (M. Jacqui Alexander & Chandra Talpade Mohanty) • Sexual Diversity in Cosmopolitan Perspective (Elisabeth Young-Bruehl) • Part Two: Feminism and the Academy: (Re)Engaging the “Knowledge Revolution” • Universities Upside Down: The Impact of the New Knowledge Economy (Margaret Thornton) • The University on-the-Ground: Reflections on the Canadian Experience (Janice Newson) • Part Three: Feminism and the Academy: Remembering History/ Recalling Resistance • Bluestockings and Goddesses: Writing Feminist Cultural History (Ann Shteir) • Feminism, Ecological Thinking and the Legacy of Rachel Carson (Lorraine Code) •

Click on the image to order the book from Fernwood Publishing.

Another book I’m interested in these days in the same general area (women, the academy, race, class) Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia Edited by Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs, Yolanda Flores Niemann, Carmen G. González, Angela P. Harris Utah State UP.   You can read the introduction (Gonzalez & Harris) here, on SSRN.  I’m still looking for a table of contents, but the book has 40 contributors and is divided into five parts – General Campus Climate; Faculty-Student Relationships; Networks of Allies; Social Class in Academia; Tenure and Promotion.

Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America.  (from the publisher)

 

March 23 Book Launch: Reconsidering Knowledge: Feminism and the Academy

 

Come and join York Feminist scholars and students at the book launch for the IFLS/CFR sponsored project

Reconsidering Knowledge: Feminism and the Academy, Edited by Meg Luxton & Mary Jane Mossman

March 23, 2012, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.  FSCR (Founders 305)

How has feminist thinking shaped what we know? Emerging from the lecture series “Feminist Knowledge Reconsidered: Feminism and the Academy,” held at York University in 2009, Reconsidering Knowledge examines current ideas about feminism in relation to knowledge, education and society, and the future potential for feminist research and teaching in the university context. Connecting early stories of women who defied their exclusion from knowledge creation to contemporary challenges for feminism in universities, this collection assesses how feminist knowledge has influenced dominant thinking and transformed teaching and learning. It also focuses on the challenges for feminism as corporatization redefines the role of universities in a global world. The essays reflect on both historical and contemporary themes from a diversity of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives, but are united in their exploration of how feminism’s continuing contribution to knowledge remains significant, even fundamental, to the transformation of knowledge in the academy and in our world.

Contents

Introduction (Mary Jane Mossman and Meg Luxton) • Part One: Feminism and the Academy: Revealing the “Other” • Feminism and the Academy: Transforming Knowledge? (Meg Luxton) • Cartographies of Knowledge and Power: Transnational Feminism as Radical Praxis (M. Jacqui Alexander & Chandra Talpade Mohanty) • Sexual Diversity in Cosmopolitan Perspective (Elisabeth Young-Bruehl) • Part Two: Feminism and the Academy: (Re)Engaging the “Knowledge Revolution” • Universities Upside Down: The Impact of the New Knowledge Economy (Margaret Thornton) • The University on-the-Ground: Reflections on the Canadian Experience (Janice Newson) • Part Three: Feminism and the Academy: Remembering History/ Recalling Resistance • Bluestockings and Goddesses: Writing Feminist Cultural History (Ann Shteir) • Feminism, Ecological Thinking and the Legacy of Rachel Carson (Lorraine Code) •

 

Joined with the book launch is the launch of the “Timeline of York Women’s Studies History to 2011” project, directed by Rusty Shteir (who is also a contributor to the book).

Click on the image to order the book from Fernwood Publishing.

Wed March 7 Book Launch @York: Daughter Deficit: Sex Selection in Tamil Nadu

Book Launch: “Daughter Deficit: Sex Selection in Tamil Nadu”, by Sharada Srinivasan (Assistant Prof, Dept. of Social Science)

Vanier Senior Common Room 010, Vanier College, York University  Wednesday Mar 07, 2012 2:30pm4:30pm Light refreshments will be provided

Reflecting on the way ahead, the book concludes that even as public policies can and should play a decisive role in reversing the immediate outcomes in favour of daughters, an environment favourable to daughters will need fundamental changes in social norms, attitudes and policies of governments and NGOs.

All info here

The Harriet Tubman Institute.