Tag Archives: Book Launch

CFR Book Launch Feb 8 @ York: “Chroniques d’une musulmane indignée” by Asmaa Ibnouzahir

Le Centre de recherches féministes présente / Centre for Feminist Research presents:

 lancement de livre / book launch

“Chroniques D’une Musulmane Indignée” 

Par/By Asmaa Ibnouzahir 

8 février, 2016 / February 8, 2016

16 h 00-17 h 30 / 4-5.30pm

Collège Universitaire Glendon, Salon Albert Tucker 3e étage, Pavillon York 317 /Chroniques Dune Musulmane Indignee poster

Glendon College, Room Albert Tucker 3rd floor, YH 317

Présenté par Dr. Amélie Barras / Introduced by Dr. Amélie Barras

Veuillez confirmer à / Please RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca by February 1 / au plus tard le 1er février, 2016

Asmaa Ibnouzahir partage un récit autobiographique racontant des défis qu’elle a relevés en tant que jeune immigrante musulmane d’origine marocaine arrivée au Québec en 1994. Elle présente également une analyse éclairante sur des questions qui reviennent souvent dans les médias québécois au sujet de l’islam, des femmes et de la société: les musulmans-es «modérés», les crimes «d’honneur», le foulard, le féminisme islamique et bien d’autres. Engagée dans les débats sociopolitiques qui ont traversé le Québec au cours de la dernière décennie, sur la religion, l’immigration et les valeurs québécoises, Asmaa Ibnouzahir livre un témoignage essentiel qui donne un accès sans précédent aux coulisses de ces débats.

Depuis une dizaine d’années, Asmaa Ibnouzahir est engagée dans la réflexion et les débats sociaux autour des droits de la personne, notamment sur les questions touchant autant à l’immigration et à la religion dans la sphère publique qu’au statut des femmes dans l’Islam. Elle a également voyagé et travaillé dans plus d’une quinzaine de pays en tant que spécialiste de la nutrition d’urgence humanitaire.

***

Asmaa Ibnouzahir shares an autobiography recounting the challenges she faced as a young Muslim Moroccan immigrant arriving in Quebec in 1994, as well as an illuminating analysis on issues that come up in the media about Islam, women and society: “moderate” Muslims, “honor” killings, headscarves, Islamic feminism, etc. Engaged in the Quebec sociopolitical debates related to these issues over the last decade, Asmaa Ibnouzahir offers an important testimony that gives unprecedented access to the corridors of these debates.

Asmaa Ibnouzahir is a feminist human rights activist who has been engaged for ten years in the social debates in Quebec on issues of immigration, religion and women. She has also worked in more than fifteen countries as a specialist in humanitarian emergency nutrition.

Co-parrainé par / Co-sponsored by: Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University.

Book Launch, December 10 630PM, Toronto: Sherene Razack’s Dying from Improvement

The Department of Social Justice Education Observes Human Rights Day and Celebrates the Launch of

Dying From Improvement by Dr. Sherene Razack

December 10, 2015 OISE Library, 252 Bloor Street West 6-830

Sponsored by the Department of Social Justice Education.
Supported by Indigenous Education Network, First Nations House,
Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto, and African Canadian Legal Clinic.

A discussion on Indigenous and racialized deaths in custody
featuring:
Lee Maracle, Critically acclaimed author and winner of the Ontario
Premier’s Award for Excellence in the Arts
Sherene Razack, Professor, Social Justice Education, OISE
And a panel of representatives from organizations working to end racism in the justice system:
Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto: Christa Big Canoe
African Canadian Legal Clinic: Anthony Morgan
Black Lives Matter Toronto: Lena Peters
This document is available in alternate format upon request
Light refreshments provided.
Contact: Stephanie Latty at lattyste@mail.utoronto.ca

BOOK LAUNCH: Theorizing Anti-Racism

From the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR):

event poster - most info included in text below

Please join us at

Book Launch

Theorizing Anti-Racism: Linkages in Marxism and Critical Race Theories

Wednesday, September 9th

2:00 PM
Nexus Lounge
12th Floor
OISE
252 Bloor St. W.  (at St. George subway station)

Panel discussion followed by refreshments and book signing

Join us to celebrate the launch of the edited volume, Theorizing Anti-Racism
Panel discussion with Abigail B. Bakan and Enakshi Dua (editors), and Sedef Arat-Koç, Himani Bannerji and Anthony Bogues (contributors)

From University of Toronto Press:

“Over the last few decades, critical theory which examines issues of race and racism has flourished. However, most of this work falls on one side or the other of a theoretical divide between theory inspired by Marxist approaches to race and racism and that inspired by postcolonial and critical race theory. Driven by the need to move beyond the divide, the contributors to Theorizing Anti-Racism present insightful essays that engage these two intellectual traditions with a focus on clarification and points of convergence. The essays in Theorizing Anti-Racism examine topics which range from reconsiderations of anti-racism in the work of Marx and Foucault to examinations of the relationships among race, class, and the state that integrate both Marxist and critical race theory. Drawing on the most constructive elements of Marxism and postcolonial and critical race theory, this collection constitutes an important contribution to the advancement of anti-racist theory.”

Sponsored by: Department of Social Justice Education (SJE), OISE, University of Toronto; Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), York University; and UofT Press.

http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/sje/

http://cfr.info.yorku.ca/

More info about Theorizing Anti-Racism:

http://www.utppublishing.com/Theorizing-Anti-Racism-Linkages-in-Marxism-and-Critical-Race-Theories.html

Table of Contents:

  1. Introduction
  2. Introducing the Questions, Reframing the Dialogue(Abigail B. Bakan and Enakshi Dua)
  3. Rethinking Foucault
    2. Revisiting Genealogies: Theorizing Anti-Racism Beyond the Impasse (Enakshi Dua)
    3. Foucault in Tunisia (Robert J. C. Young)
    4. Not Quite A Case of the Disappearing Marx: Tracing The Place of Material Relations in Postcolonial Theory (Enakshi Dua)

III. Revisiting Marx
5. Marxism and Anti-Racism: Rethinking the Politics of Difference (Abigail B. Bakan)
6. Marxism and Anti-Racism in Theory and Practice: Reflections and Interpretations (Himani Bannerji)

  1. Legacies And Relationships
    7. C. L. R. James and W. E. B. Du Bois: Black Jacobins and Black Reconstruction, Writing Heresy and Revisionist Histories (Anthony Bogues)
    8. Colonizing, colonized: Sartre and Fanon (Audrey Kobayashi and Mark Boyle)
    9. Intellectuals, Oppression, and Anti-Racist Movements in South Africa (Eunice N. Sahle)
  2. Interventions in Race, Class and State
    10. Race, Class and Colonialism: Reconsidering the ³Jewish Question² (Abigail B. Bakan)
    11. Race, Sovereignty and Empire: Theorizing the Camp, Theorizing Post/Modernity (Sunera Thobani)
    12. Rethinking Whiteness, ³Culturalism,² and the Bourgeoisie in the Age of Neoliberalism (Sedef Arat-Koç)
    13. Race and the Management of Labour in United States History (Elizabeth Esch and David Roediger)

 

 

{Book Launch} Sept 22: Subversive Property: Law & the Production of Spaces of Belonging by Sarah Keenan (SOAS)

 IFLS Speaker Series & Socio Legal Studies Speaker Series

{Book Launch} Subversive Property: Law and the Production of Spaces of Belonging with Sarah Keenan (SOAS)

Monday September 22  230-4   IKB (Osgoode Hall)  Room 2003 22SeptSarahJKeenanROOM CHANGE IKB 2027 FACULTY COMMON ROOM

Sarah Keenan is lecturer in Law at SOAS, University of London.  She teaches Property, Feminist Legal Theory and Indigenous Land Rights and is also engaged in community-based struggles around each of these issues.  She’s been to the IFLS before, see these posts.          

pdf poster for sharing, printing here

This book explores the relationship between space, subjectivity and property, arguing that new political possibilities for property may be unveiled by thinking about property in terms of belonging rather than exclusion.  While most socio-legal theories of property focus on the propertied subject and that subject’s right to exclude, this book shifts focus away from the propertied subject and on to the broader spaces in and through which the propertied subject is located.  Using case studies, such as analyses of compulsory leases under Australia’s Northern Territory Intervention and lesbian asylum cases from a range of jurisdictions, the book argues that these spaces consist of networks of relations that revolve around belonging: not just belonging between subject and object, as property is traditionally understood, but also the less explored relation of belonging between the part and the whole.  This presentation will discuss the main themes of the book to suggest ways in which subversive property might offer a conceptually useful way of analysing a wide range of socio-legal issues.

 

 

Light refreshments will be provided

Questions? Please contact the IFLS administrator, Lielle Gonsalves LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca

 

IFLS talks on [video]tape: Dressing Constitutionally: Hierarchy, Sexuality and Democracy from our hairstyles to our shoes

Capture

Prof. Ruthann Robson

Dressing Constitutionally: Hierarchy, Sexuality and Democracy 

Watch the talk Ruthann Robson gave at Osgoode September 23, 2013, complete with Introduction by Osgoode’s Kate Sutherland.

Here is a link to the book Dressing Constitutionally and you can see Professor Robson’s blog on the subject of Dressing Constitutionally, here.  You can also follow @robsonconlaw on twitter, AND you can check out her writing outside legal scholarship via her website, here.