Tag Archives: anti racism

BOOK LAUNCH: Theorizing Anti-Racism

From the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR):

event poster - most info included in text below

Please join us at

Book Launch

Theorizing Anti-Racism: Linkages in Marxism and Critical Race Theories

Wednesday, September 9th

2:00 PM
Nexus Lounge
12th Floor
OISE
252 Bloor St. W.  (at St. George subway station)

Panel discussion followed by refreshments and book signing

Join us to celebrate the launch of the edited volume, Theorizing Anti-Racism
Panel discussion with Abigail B. Bakan and Enakshi Dua (editors), and Sedef Arat-Koç, Himani Bannerji and Anthony Bogues (contributors)

From University of Toronto Press:

“Over the last few decades, critical theory which examines issues of race and racism has flourished. However, most of this work falls on one side or the other of a theoretical divide between theory inspired by Marxist approaches to race and racism and that inspired by postcolonial and critical race theory. Driven by the need to move beyond the divide, the contributors to Theorizing Anti-Racism present insightful essays that engage these two intellectual traditions with a focus on clarification and points of convergence. The essays in Theorizing Anti-Racism examine topics which range from reconsiderations of anti-racism in the work of Marx and Foucault to examinations of the relationships among race, class, and the state that integrate both Marxist and critical race theory. Drawing on the most constructive elements of Marxism and postcolonial and critical race theory, this collection constitutes an important contribution to the advancement of anti-racist theory.”

Sponsored by: Department of Social Justice Education (SJE), OISE, University of Toronto; Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), York University; and UofT Press.

http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/sje/

http://cfr.info.yorku.ca/

More info about Theorizing Anti-Racism:

http://www.utppublishing.com/Theorizing-Anti-Racism-Linkages-in-Marxism-and-Critical-Race-Theories.html

Table of Contents:

  1. Introduction
  2. Introducing the Questions, Reframing the Dialogue(Abigail B. Bakan and Enakshi Dua)
  3. Rethinking Foucault
    2. Revisiting Genealogies: Theorizing Anti-Racism Beyond the Impasse (Enakshi Dua)
    3. Foucault in Tunisia (Robert J. C. Young)
    4. Not Quite A Case of the Disappearing Marx: Tracing The Place of Material Relations in Postcolonial Theory (Enakshi Dua)

III. Revisiting Marx
5. Marxism and Anti-Racism: Rethinking the Politics of Difference (Abigail B. Bakan)
6. Marxism and Anti-Racism in Theory and Practice: Reflections and Interpretations (Himani Bannerji)

  1. Legacies And Relationships
    7. C. L. R. James and W. E. B. Du Bois: Black Jacobins and Black Reconstruction, Writing Heresy and Revisionist Histories (Anthony Bogues)
    8. Colonizing, colonized: Sartre and Fanon (Audrey Kobayashi and Mark Boyle)
    9. Intellectuals, Oppression, and Anti-Racist Movements in South Africa (Eunice N. Sahle)
  2. Interventions in Race, Class and State
    10. Race, Class and Colonialism: Reconsidering the ³Jewish Question² (Abigail B. Bakan)
    11. Race, Sovereignty and Empire: Theorizing the Camp, Theorizing Post/Modernity (Sunera Thobani)
    12. Rethinking Whiteness, ³Culturalism,² and the Bourgeoisie in the Age of Neoliberalism (Sedef Arat-Koç)
    13. Race and the Management of Labour in United States History (Elizabeth Esch and David Roediger)

 

 

Lawrence reviews Sara Ahmed's On Being Included on Jotwell

I reviewed Sara Ahmed’s On Being Included on Jotwell, here: bit.ly/1cdXfyg

After reading Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia1 and attending the Symposium organized around the book by the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law and Justice, I came home to find Sara Ahmed’s On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life waiting in my mailbox (this Jot is about On Being Included, although I’m quite prepared to say that I like Presumed Incompetent (lots) as well). The combination of these two books, both filled with personal stories and institutional insight, cracked my vision of my own place in the legal academy, and the “practice” of diversity, wide open. I read this work as a person who shares a (not surprising, really) number of experiences-as-academic with Ahmed. I read it just after reading the often deeply personal essays in Presumed Incompetent. I also read it as a person who has worked to avoid being noticed as “the problem” while trying to maintain a commitment to anti-racist work. These days, that means deep concern that my own strategies and efforts are nothing more than thinly veneered cooptation. All of these things, I think, amplified the impact of the book on me. But I still do not hesitate to recommend it to you, Jotwell reader

Go and read the full review, if you have a few minutes.

If you aren’t following Jotwell: Equality (and the other sections too), maybe consider it? A good way to have other people curate some of the flood of publications.  Also, that picture of me on jotwell – more than 10 years old, so, yes. Especially in light of the fact that I can update social media 10x a day, I can probably manage a new photo.

Welcome to summer, if you’re in my hemisphere.