November 28 at York: Problematizing international discourses on displacement and sexual violence in Central Africa | Centre for Refugee Studies

Centre for Refugee Studies celebrates 25 years with a keynote address by

Dr. Patricia Daley, Oxford University 

Thursday, November 28th  3:00pm – 5:00pm

Room 519, Kaneff Tower  Yorku 

Problematizing International Discourses on Displacement and Sexual Violence in Central Africa

Dr. Daley’s latest publication is titled “Refugees, idps and Citizenship Rights: the perils of humanitarianism in the African Great Lakes region”. It can be found here.  

Current Research

Her principal research interests are on the intersection between global geo-politics, militarism, masculinities, genocidal violence, humanitarianism and forced migration in East and Central Africa. She is also interested in the dynamics of land tenure, resource extraction and environmental change from a political ecology perspective. Her other projects include an examination of the condition of new African diaspora communities in Great Britain, focusing on issues relating to their spatial distribution, socio-economic status and housing characteristics, and the negotiation of their multiple identities, especially that arising from the experience of trans-racial fostering.  http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/staff/pdaley.html#bio

Other publications include

Daley, P. (2007) Gender and Genocide in Burundi: The Search for Spaces of Peace in the Great Lakes Region, Oxford: James Currey, Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press 

 

Sponsored by:

Office of Dean of LA&PS Office of Dean of FES Office of VP Research & Innovation Centre for Feminist Research Department of Social Science York Centre for International & Strategic Studies Faculty of Graduate Studies School of Gender, Sexuality & WS Development Studies Department of Geography Harriet Tubman Institute Social and Political Thought Graduate Program in Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies Graduate Program in Sociology Department of Gender Studies, Queen’s University

This Friday: 1st talk in the Osgoode Law.Arts.Culture Colloquium 2013-2014: Anthony Farley

Imagine! you could spend all Friday afternoon in great talks at York – Farley, then Cunliffe.

Law.Arts.Culture Colloquium 2013-2014 (link to RSVP)

The Law.Arts.Culture Colloquium, convened by Osgoode’s aims to explore the intersection of Law and the Arts, in an effort to foster a multidisciplinary research community, and promote a humanistic legal education in which students reflect on diverse images of justice, their cultural sources, and the role of law in producing the stories a society tells about itself. Anthony Farley

Friday, November 22, 2013  1230-2PM

Osgoode Hall/IKB 2027

The Unreality of Time: Memory, Punishment, and Transcendence in the African American Experience

ANTHONY FARLEY 
Albany Law School

Prof. Farley specializes in Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure and Legal Theory. Prof. Farley was a tenured member of the Boston College Law School faculty, where he taught for sixteen years prior to joining his wife, Associate Prof. Maria Grahn-Farley, on the Albany Law School faculty. Prior to entering academia, Prof. Farley served as an Assistant United States Attorney with the Office of the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. Prior to his time as a federal prosecutor, Prof. Farley practiced law as a Corporate/Securities Associate with Shearman & Sterling in New York City.

In 2006-2007 Farley was honored as the 11th holder of the Haywood Burns Chair in Civil Rights at CUNY School of Law. In 2005, the Boston College Black Law Students Association honored him as the first recipient of The Anthony P. Farley Excellence in Teaching Award, an annual teaching award bearing his name. In 2003, he was the recipient of a residential fellowship with the Humanities Research Institute of the University of California.

Farley’s work in legal theory and constitutional law has appeared in chapter form in After the Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning of Hurricane Katrina (Troutt ed., The New Press: 2006); Cultural Analysis, Cultural Studies & the Law (Sarat & Simon eds., Duke University Press: 2003); Crossroads, Directions & a New Critical Race Theory (Valdes et. al. eds., Temple University Press: 2002); Black Men on Race, Gender & Sexuality (Carbado ed., NYU Press: 1999); and Urgent Times: Policing and Rights in Inner-City Communities (Meares & Kahan eds., Beacon: 1999). His work has also appeared in numerous academic journals, including the Yale Journal of Law & Humanities, the NYU Review of Law & Social Change, the Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal, the Columbia Journal of Race and Law, the Cardozo Law Review, Law & Literature, and the Michigan Journal of Race & Law.

Lunch will be served, all are invited to attend.

Kindly RSVP: http://lawartsculture.eventbrite.ca/

This Friday: Emma Cunliffe at SLST Series: Women and Wrongful Convictions: Learning from 'difference'


The Socio-Legal Studies 2013-2014 Speaker Series 

Friday, November 22, 2013  2:30 – 4:00pm

Ross South 701 

Dr. Emma Cunliffe

Faculty of Law University of British Columbia

Women and Wrongful Convictions:  Learning from Difference

E. Cunliffe

Dr. Emma Cunliffe is an Associate Professor in the UBC Faculty of Law.  Dr. Cunliffe’s research focuses on medical, scientific and behavioural evidence in criminal trials; and more generally considers the interplay between expert knowledges, common sense and legal reasoning. She is the author of Murder, Medicine and Motherhood (Hart Publishing, 2011) which examines the case of Kathleen Folbigg, a mother who was convicted of murdering her children based on misleading medical evidence. Her book demonstrates how legal process, medical knowledge and expectations of motherhood work together when a mother is charged with killing infants who have died in mysterious circumstances. With funding from SSHRC, she is working with Professor Christine Boyle on a project examining child homicide cases in Canada. Dr Cunliffe is a member of the editorial board for the International Journal of Evidence & Proof.  At UBC, she teaches criminal law, evidence and a graduate seminar in research methodologies and has won the Killam Award for Teaching Excellence and the George Curtis Memorial Award for Teaching.

 Co-Sponsored by: Criminology and the Institute for Feminist Legal Studies

 

 

brief followup on Talking Back to Toronto Life on Race/Space/SexualAssault

Toronto Life published our letter, friends.  November 2013

[for the background to this issue, see this post from late September  (which includes the full text of the letter we sent).

They didn’t publish the whole thing.   Inter alia,  they left out this line:

 It relies on racist tropes about the dangers of Jane and Finch, sexist ignorance of the true nature of women’s vulnerability to sexual assault and elitist disregard for everything outside the zones of the 1%.

Toronto Life is still under threat of action by York, though, so who knows what the strategy could be (note the number of letters and the direction of all the comments).

Sorry that I do not have an e-version, but here is a PDF which might be slightly more accessible. I did ask them to publish a link to access the full list of signatories….but they did not respond.

Toronto Life November 2013_Page_1