Category Archives: What we’re thinking/reading/doing (IFLS blog)

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Neo-Feminism / Prof. Aya Gruber (Colorado) October 1 230PM

Neo Feminism poster (all information in the post)IFLS Speakers Series 2014-15

IKB (Osgoode Hall) 2027
Wed. Oct. 1, 230-4PM

NEOFEMINISM

Prof. Aya Gruber (Colorado Law)

Far from being moribund, feminist legal theory is breaking from its somewhat dogmatic past and forging ahead with new vigor. Many modern feminist legal scholars seek innovative ways to better the legal, social, and economic status of women while simultaneously questioning some of the more troubling moves of second-wave feminism, such as the tendency to essentialize the woman’s experience, the turn to authoritarian state policies, and the characterization of women as pure objects or agents. These “neofeminists” prioritize women’s issues but maintain a strong commitment to distributive justice and recognize that subordination exists on multiple axes. In defining “neofeminism,” Professor Gruber will examine how the troubling nature of certain second-wave feminist principles engendered new schools of feminist thought, illustrating this process in the domestic violence law reform context.

 

Professor Gruber joined the University of Colorado Law School faculty as a professor of law in 2010. Prior to her appointment at Colorado, she was a professor of law at the University of Iowa College of Law and a founding faculty member at Florida International University College of Law, South Florida’s first public law school. Professor Gruber teaches Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure (Investigation), Criminal Procedure (Adjudication), and other courses related to criminal law and critical theory. After law school, Professor Gruber clerked on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida and then served as a felony trial attorney with the Public Defender Service in Washington, D.C. and Federal Public Defender in Miami. Professor Gruber’s main research areas are substantive criminal law (emphasizing victim’s rights, race, and gender); criminal procedure, feminist legal theory, and national security and foreign relations law.

 PDF POSTER FOR SHARING HERE

Light refreshments will be provided

Questions? Please contact the IFLS administrator, Lielle Gonsalves LGonsalves@osgoode.yorku.ca 

CFP: Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting Seattle, May 28 – 31, 2015

This came by email today!

h/t  Ummni Khan

 

Call for Papers – Friday September 19th Deadline
Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting Seattle, May 28 – 31, 2015
Dear friends and colleagues,
We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in 2015.
Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: http://www.lawandsociety.org/Seattle2015/seattle2015.html
Within Law & Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities. We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.
Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.
Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a commentator for each individual paper. A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject and will ask CRN members to volunteer to serve as chairs of each panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before their upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for recruiting commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter.
If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please submit a 400-500 word abstract, with your name and a title, on the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page (details provided below). If you would like to serve as a chair or a commentator for one of our panels, or if you are already planning a LSA session with four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Cynthia Godsoe know (cynthia.godsoe@brooklaw.edu). In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion. If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please
let us know.
TWEN is an online resource administered by Westlaw. If you have access to Westlaw but haven’t yet registered for the TWEN page, signing up is easy:
Sign onto Westlaw, hit the tab on the top for “TWEN,” then click “Add Course,” and choose the “FLT CRN 2014” from the drop-down list of National TWEN Courses.
Once you arrive at the Feminist Legal Theory CRN TWEN page, look to the left hand margin and click on “Law & Society 2015 – Abstracts.” If you do not have a Westlaw password, please email Aziza Ahmed at Az.Ahmed@neu.edu and ask to be enrolled directly.
Please submit all proposals for paper presentations by Friday, September 19. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. If we cannot accept all proposals for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.
We hope you’ll join us in Seattle to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.
Best,
LSA Planning Committee
Aziza Ahmed
Cynthia Godsoe
Leslie Harris
Courtney Joslin
Ummni Khan
Dara Purvis
Julie Shapiro

NIP: Ed. Collection: Within the Confines: Women & the Law in Canada

Within the Confines: Women & the Law in Canada

The editor is Jennifer Kilty, of U of O Criminology, and the Table of Contents is quite broad (see here) with contributions from UBC’s Emma Cunliffe U of M’s Amar Khoday and U of O’s Angela Cameron.

PreOrder Available for November release.

 

Western feminists have long treated the rule of law as an essential ingredient of social justice; however, as the contributors to this collection remind us, meaningful justice remains out of reach for many women and racialized minorities precisely because the law turns a blind eye to the inequities that structure their daily lives. In fourteen chapters that open vital debates about the erosion of the welfare state and the media’s complicity in concealing political injustice, Within the Confines details the brutal ironies of a society that criminalizes the vulnerable while absolving the elite. 

Distinctive in its focus on Canada, the book traces the linkages among racial, ethnic, sexual, and economic vulnerability and reveals the inadequacies of legislative approaches to socio-historical problems such as drug trafficking, homelessness, infanticide, and the legacies of settler colonial violence. In accessible prose, the authors dismantle the myths behind topics that are often sensationalized in the media—pornography, single motherhood, sex work, filicide, gangs, domestic abuse, prison conditions, HIV nondisclosure—and present alternative arguments that expose the justice system’s role in widening the gap between the rich and the poor. What emerges is a poignant challenge to the neoliberal fable that women and minorities in Western democracies now enjoy full equality and an urgent call to action for those who seek to shift institutional norms in more equitable directions. 

A valuable resource for a wide range of fields, including criminology, sociology, social anthropology, gender studies, political science, social work, and legal history, this multidisciplinary volume offers a fresh perspective on the disturbingly predictable judgments that criminalized women face in Canada.

Empiricism and Equality: Studying Fathers’ Rights – Robson reviews Behre at Jotwell Equality

Empiricism and Equality: Studying Fathers’ Rights – Jotwell: Equality.

Very interesting, go and have a look at the review – and the article (Kelly A. Behre, Digging Beneath the Equality Language: The Influence of the Fathers’ Rights Movement on Intimate Partner Violence Public Policy Debates and Family Law Reform, 21 Wm. & Mary J.  Women & L. (forthcoming 2014), available at SSRN.).

While discussions, critiques, and analysis of the equality rhetoric of the international fathers’ rights movements are not novel, Kelly Behre’s article, Digging Beneath the Equality Language: The Influence of the Fathers’ Rights Movement on Intimate Partner Violence Public Policy Debates and Family Law Reform, does – – – as the title promises – – – “dig beneath.” The article’s first section is an excellent overview of the equality narratives of the fathers’ rights movement, including the appeal to civil rights movements and the use of both discrimination and gender-neutral tropes. But the real contribution of Behre’s article is her exploration of the relationship between empiricism and equality. [from Ruthann Robson's explanation of why she likes the article - lots]

 

Just before i go and teach, I was astonished that the story of Danièle Watts’s experience with the police in Los Angeles is making the Canadian morning news - not unhappy, just astonished.  But I wanted to say…this is a good example of something which is not new at all, but is news. This isn’t just in the US. And it isn’t just about interracial dating.  Assuming that Black and Indigenous women (in cars? near cars?) are selling sex isn’t unusual police behaviour – nor is it unusual for just ordinary folk to do it (this was a part of the Stacey Bonds story (sorry I cannot link to the IFLS posts because something is up this am – here is the ruling throwing out charges against HER, at least), and was noted in the Report of the Commission on Systemic Racism in the Ontario Criminal Justice System. (1995)).  This is part of how some citizens have to police their own behaviour, locations, dress, etc, if they don’t want to unfairly attract the wrong (police!) attention (to say nothing of the situation of actual sex workers).   This is one way that racial profiling affects racialized women – and particularly some racialized women.   I’d love to hear more about this.  As always, the use of one incident to dramatically illustrate something is both wonderful (light of day!), and troubling (discovery!??).