Category Archives: Other Events

events of potential interest to our members

CFP: Joint Scholars & Scholarship Workshop on Feminist Jurisprudence

pict of Broadway, NYC

An interesting workshop opportunity in New York City, recently posted here on the Feminist Law Professors blog:

Joint Scholars & Scholarship Workshop on Feminist JurisprudenceJanuary 6, 2016
Fordham Law School

Sponsored by the Legal Writing Institute (LWI), the Association of Legal Writing Directors (ALWD), and the Legal Writing, Reasoning, and Research Section of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS).

LWI, ALWD, and the AALS Legal Writing Section are excited to collaborate with Fordham Law School in celebration of feminist scholars and scholars of feminist jurisprudence by offering a half-day workshop.   The Scholars & Scholarship Workshop will take place at Fordham Law School on January 6, 2016, the day prior to the beginning of the 2016 AALS Annual Meeting in New York City.

The Workshop is focused on scholarly writing and teaching in the field of feminist jurisprudence. Our goal is to encourage and support the work of scholars, including jurists and practitioners, as they challenge patriarchy and other hierarchical structures, critique existing jurisprudence from multicultural feminist perspectives, and share strategies and techniques for bringing a feminist perspective into the classroom.  It extends the conversation of the more than 50 scholars involved in the creation of the edited volume, Feminist Judgments: Rewritten Opinions of the United States Supreme Court (Kathryn  Stanchi, Linda Berger & Bridget Crawford eds., Cambridge University Press 2016).  We hope to more broadly support the work of feminist scholars in the academy, regardless of their subject area of study.

If you are interested in presenting a draft paper to receive feedback from an audience of informed scholars in a safe and supportive environment, please submit an abstract to the Scholars & Scholarship Workshop by October 5, 2015.  Abstracts should be no longer than 500 words in length and should be emailed to Professors Nantiya Ruan at nruan@law.du.edu and Shailini Jandial George at sjgeorge@suffolk.edu.  Those submitting abstracts will be informed of whether they were chosen to participate by October 31, 2015, and drafts will be sent to readers in mid-December.

If you are interested in attending the workshop, you can register here:

http://goo.gl/forms/GLpx1ylHkX

For more on feminist judgment projects, see a couple of our posts from earlier this year:  here and here.

 

 

BOOK LAUNCH: Theorizing Anti-Racism

From the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR):

event poster - most info included in text below

Please join us at

Book Launch

Theorizing Anti-Racism: Linkages in Marxism and Critical Race Theories

Wednesday, September 9th

2:00 PM
Nexus Lounge
12th Floor
OISE
252 Bloor St. W.  (at St. George subway station)

Panel discussion followed by refreshments and book signing

Join us to celebrate the launch of the edited volume, Theorizing Anti-Racism
Panel discussion with Abigail B. Bakan and Enakshi Dua (editors), and Sedef Arat-Koç, Himani Bannerji and Anthony Bogues (contributors)

From University of Toronto Press:

“Over the last few decades, critical theory which examines issues of race and racism has flourished. However, most of this work falls on one side or the other of a theoretical divide between theory inspired by Marxist approaches to race and racism and that inspired by postcolonial and critical race theory. Driven by the need to move beyond the divide, the contributors to Theorizing Anti-Racism present insightful essays that engage these two intellectual traditions with a focus on clarification and points of convergence. The essays in Theorizing Anti-Racism examine topics which range from reconsiderations of anti-racism in the work of Marx and Foucault to examinations of the relationships among race, class, and the state that integrate both Marxist and critical race theory. Drawing on the most constructive elements of Marxism and postcolonial and critical race theory, this collection constitutes an important contribution to the advancement of anti-racist theory.”

Sponsored by: Department of Social Justice Education (SJE), OISE, University of Toronto; Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), York University; and UofT Press.

http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/sje/

http://cfr.info.yorku.ca/

More info about Theorizing Anti-Racism:

http://www.utppublishing.com/Theorizing-Anti-Racism-Linkages-in-Marxism-and-Critical-Race-Theories.html

Table of Contents:

  1. Introduction
  2. Introducing the Questions, Reframing the Dialogue(Abigail B. Bakan and Enakshi Dua)
  3. Rethinking Foucault
    2. Revisiting Genealogies: Theorizing Anti-Racism Beyond the Impasse (Enakshi Dua)
    3. Foucault in Tunisia (Robert J. C. Young)
    4. Not Quite A Case of the Disappearing Marx: Tracing The Place of Material Relations in Postcolonial Theory (Enakshi Dua)

III. Revisiting Marx
5. Marxism and Anti-Racism: Rethinking the Politics of Difference (Abigail B. Bakan)
6. Marxism and Anti-Racism in Theory and Practice: Reflections and Interpretations (Himani Bannerji)

  1. Legacies And Relationships
    7. C. L. R. James and W. E. B. Du Bois: Black Jacobins and Black Reconstruction, Writing Heresy and Revisionist Histories (Anthony Bogues)
    8. Colonizing, colonized: Sartre and Fanon (Audrey Kobayashi and Mark Boyle)
    9. Intellectuals, Oppression, and Anti-Racist Movements in South Africa (Eunice N. Sahle)
  2. Interventions in Race, Class and State
    10. Race, Class and Colonialism: Reconsidering the ³Jewish Question² (Abigail B. Bakan)
    11. Race, Sovereignty and Empire: Theorizing the Camp, Theorizing Post/Modernity (Sunera Thobani)
    12. Rethinking Whiteness, ³Culturalism,² and the Bourgeoisie in the Age of Neoliberalism (Sedef Arat-Koç)
    13. Race and the Management of Labour in United States History (Elizabeth Esch and David Roediger)

 

 

CFP: Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the 2016 LSA Annual Meeting in New Orleans

New Orleans themed face masks
CC image courtesy of David Ohmer on Flickr

For those thinking of attending the Law and Society Association’s Annual Meeting in New Orleans next June, take note! From the Planning Committee:

Call for Papers – Friday September 18th Deadline Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Association Annual Meeting New Orleans, June 2-5, 2016

Dear friends and colleagues,

We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in 2016.

Information about the Law and Society meeting (including registration and hotel information) is at: www.lawandsociety.org/NewOrleans2016/neworleans2016.html.

Within Law & Society, the Feminist Legal Theory CRN seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. There is no pre-set theme to which papers must conform. We would be especially happy to see proposals that fit in with the LSA conference theme, which is belonging, place, and visions of law and social change. We welcome proposals that would permit us to collaborate with other CRNs, such as the Critical Research on Race and the Law CRN or the Gender, Sexuality and the Law CRN. Also, because the LSA meeting attracts scholars from other disciplines, we welcome multidisciplinary proposals.

Our goal is to stimulate focused discussion of papers on which scholars are currently working. Thus, while proposals may reference work that is well on the way to publication, we are particularly eager to solicit proposals for works-in-progress that are at an earlier stage and will benefit from the discussion that the panels will provide.

A committee of the CRN will assign individual papers to panels based on subject. Our panels will use the LSA format, which requires four papers, but we will continue our custom of assigning a chair for the panel and a commentator for each individual paper. As a condition of participating as a panelist, you must also agree to serve as a chair or commentator for another panel or participant. We will of course take into account your scheduling and topic preferences to the degree possible.

The duties of a chair are to organize the panel logistically, including registering it online with the LSA, and moderating the panel. The chair will develop a 100-250 word description for the session and submit the session proposal to LSA before their upcoming deadline on October 15, so that each panelist can submit his or her proposal, using the panel number assigned. Chairs will also be responsible for assigning commentators but may wait to do so until panels have been scheduled later this winter. The duties of a commentator are to read one paper and provide verbal comments as well as brief written (email is fine) comments.

If you would like to present a paper as part of a CRN panel, please email an abstract or summary, along with your name and a title, to Jessica Clarke at jessicaclarke@umn.edu. There is no need to upload the document to the TWEN site this year. Note that LSA is imposing a new requirement that your summary be at least 1,000 words long. Although a shorter summary will suffice for our purposes, you will be required to upload a 1,000 word summary in advance of LSA’s deadline on

October 15. If you are already planning a LSA session with at least four panelists (and papers) that you would like to see included in the Feminist Legal Theory CRN, please let Jessica know.

In addition to these panels, we may try to use some of the other formats that the LSA provides: the “author meets readers” format, salon, or the roundtable discussion. If you have an idea that you think would work well in one of these formats, please let us know. Please note that for roundtables, organizers are now required to provide a 500 word summary of the topic and the contributions they expect the proposed participants to make. Please also note that LSA rules limit you to participating only once as a paper panelist or roundtable participant.

Please submit all proposals by Friday, September 18. This will permit us to organize panels and submit them prior to the LSA’s deadline on October 15. In the past, we have attempted to accommodate as many panelists as possible, but have been unable to accept all proposals. If we are unable to accept your proposal for the CRN, we will notify you by early October so that you can submit an independent proposal to LSA.

We hope you’ll join us in New Orleans to discuss the scholarship in which we are all engaged and connect with others doing work on feminism and gender.

Best,

LSA Planning Committee

Jessica Clarke
Jill Hasday
Jessica Knouse
Elizabeth Kukura
Seema Mohapatra
Marc Spindelman

 

Angela P Harris Keynote: Compassion & Critique

This keynote is from the really interesting Law and the Curated Body conference put on by my colleague Faisal Bhabha and Jennifer Fisher of York’s Department of Visual Art and Art History.

Angela P. Harris will be known to most readers of this blog.  Now at UC Davis School of Law, she’s been at the forefront of critical race and critical legal scholarship for a long time now.  She’s one of the editors of Presumed Incompetent:​ ​The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia (2012, Utah State UP) (there is a transcribed interview, here, where she discusses the book, it’s reception, and the impact of increased corporatization of universities).

In this talk, she explores the connections between mindfulness (she teaches a course called “Mindfulness and Professional Identity: Becoming a Lawyer While Keeping Your Values Intact”) and critical race scholarship, illustrating the ways in which she sees the two as intimately connected.  The talk isn’t an easy one – she details violence and challenges our responses to it.   Harris also spotlights the work of many Black female artists in the accompanying slides.   Take the time to have a look.

 

Discussion IS YOUR BODY A TOXIC SITE? reproductive health as an environmental issue

Osgoode (and FES) colleague Dayna Nadine Scott, editor of the recent “Our Chemical Selves”, will be a panellist at this evening of discussion hosted by the Politics of Evidence Working GroupHow is human reproductive health affected by everyday encounters with a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors? This evening’s discussion will explore what we know about the endocrine disrupting chemicals in our waters, air, and consumer products, and our relationship to science, government, industry and environmentalism. What does the research tell us? How are they regulated here in Canada? WHY DON’T WE KNOW MORE? IS YOUR BODY A TOXIC SITE? reproductive health as an environmental issue AN EVENING OF DISCUSSION THE POLITICS OF EVIDENCE WORKING GROUP PRESENTS: WHEN Friday, May 15, 2015 WHERE University of Toronto, Emmanuel College, Rm 001 75 Queen’s Park Crescent TIME 7pm. Doors open at 6pm ADMISSION Free Space is Limited. Please register at: www.environmentaldefence.ca/panel Join scientist Dr. Miriam Diamond, lawyer Dr. Dayna Scott, and science studies scholar Dr. Michelle Murphy to discuss the current debates surrounding our exposure to endocrine disruptors and what you can do to change it. IN PARTNERSHIP WITH Dr. Miriam Diamond Dr. Michelle Murphy Dr. Dayna Scott

May 15 7PM (link with more information and registration)

How is human reproductive health affected by everyday  encounters with a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors? This evening’s discussion will explore what we know about the endocrine disrupting chemicals in our waters, air, and consumer products, and our relationship to science, government, industry and environmentalism. What does the research tell us? How are they regulated here in Canada?

WHY DON’T WE KNOW MORE?

 

PDF poster for Sharing/printing

 

cover image for Our Chemical Selves 2015 UBC Press Dayna Nadine Scott ed