Category Archives: (New) in Print

CFR Book Launch Feb 8 @ York: “Chroniques d’une musulmane indignée” by Asmaa Ibnouzahir

Le Centre de recherches féministes présente / Centre for Feminist Research presents:

 lancement de livre / book launch

“Chroniques D’une Musulmane Indignée” 

Par/By Asmaa Ibnouzahir 

8 février, 2016 / February 8, 2016

16 h 00-17 h 30 / 4-5.30pm

Collège Universitaire Glendon, Salon Albert Tucker 3e étage, Pavillon York 317 /Chroniques Dune Musulmane Indignee poster

Glendon College, Room Albert Tucker 3rd floor, YH 317

Présenté par Dr. Amélie Barras / Introduced by Dr. Amélie Barras

Veuillez confirmer à / Please RSVP to juliapyr@yorku.ca by February 1 / au plus tard le 1er février, 2016

Asmaa Ibnouzahir partage un récit autobiographique racontant des défis qu’elle a relevés en tant que jeune immigrante musulmane d’origine marocaine arrivée au Québec en 1994. Elle présente également une analyse éclairante sur des questions qui reviennent souvent dans les médias québécois au sujet de l’islam, des femmes et de la société: les musulmans-es «modérés», les crimes «d’honneur», le foulard, le féminisme islamique et bien d’autres. Engagée dans les débats sociopolitiques qui ont traversé le Québec au cours de la dernière décennie, sur la religion, l’immigration et les valeurs québécoises, Asmaa Ibnouzahir livre un témoignage essentiel qui donne un accès sans précédent aux coulisses de ces débats.

Depuis une dizaine d’années, Asmaa Ibnouzahir est engagée dans la réflexion et les débats sociaux autour des droits de la personne, notamment sur les questions touchant autant à l’immigration et à la religion dans la sphère publique qu’au statut des femmes dans l’Islam. Elle a également voyagé et travaillé dans plus d’une quinzaine de pays en tant que spécialiste de la nutrition d’urgence humanitaire.

***

Asmaa Ibnouzahir shares an autobiography recounting the challenges she faced as a young Muslim Moroccan immigrant arriving in Quebec in 1994, as well as an illuminating analysis on issues that come up in the media about Islam, women and society: “moderate” Muslims, “honor” killings, headscarves, Islamic feminism, etc. Engaged in the Quebec sociopolitical debates related to these issues over the last decade, Asmaa Ibnouzahir offers an important testimony that gives unprecedented access to the corridors of these debates.

Asmaa Ibnouzahir is a feminist human rights activist who has been engaged for ten years in the social debates in Quebec on issues of immigration, religion and women. She has also worked in more than fifteen countries as a specialist in humanitarian emergency nutrition.

Co-parrainé par / Co-sponsored by: Gender, Feminist and Women’s Studies and the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University.

NIP: Why Some Men Are Above the Law by Martha C. Nussbaum

Famous men standardly get away with sexual harms, and for the most part will continue to do so. They know they are above the law, and they are therefore undeterrable. What can society do? Don’t give actors and athletes such glamor and reputational power. But that won’t happen in the real world. What can women do? Don’t be fooled by glamor. Do not date such men, unless you know them very, very well. Do not go to their homes. Never be alone in a room with them. And if you ignore my sage advice and encounter trouble, move on. Do not let your life get hijacked by an almost certainly futile effort at justice. Focus on your own welfare, and in this case that means: forget the law.

Source: Why Some Men Are Above the Law | Martha C. Nussbaum

An interesting intervention from the eminent scholar.  One question this leaves open for me is this – how are we defining famous?  I wonder whether in truth it is defined largely in relation to the standing of the woman in question and calibrated to the jurisdiction. Famous enough…

New in Print: “To Live Freely in This World: Sex Worker Activism in Africa” by Chi Adanna Mgbako

book cover
source: http://nyupress.org/books/9781479849062/

A new book for a new year. Here’s one to add to our 2016 feminist reading list, just released from NYU press.

To Live Freely in This World: Sex Worker Activism in Africa by Chi Adanna Mgbako

From the publisher’s website:

Sex worker activists throughout Africa are demanding an end to the criminalization of sex work and the recognition of their human rights to safe working conditions, health and justice services, and lives free from violence and discrimination. To Live Freely in This World is the first book to tell the story of the brave activists at the beating heart of the sex workers’ rights movement in Africa—the newest and most vibrant face of the global sex workers’ rights struggle. African sex worker activists are proving that communities facing human rights abuses are not bereft of agency. They’re challenging politicians, religious fundamentalists, and anti-prostitution advocates; confronting the multiple stigmas that affect the diverse members of their communities; engaging in intersectional movement building with similarly marginalized groups; and participating in the larger global sex workers’ rights struggle in order to determine their social and political fate.

By locating this counter-narrative in Africa, To Live Freely in This World challenges disempowering and one-dimensional depictions of “degraded Third World prostitutes” and helps fill what has been a gaping hole in feminist scholarship regarding sex work in the African context. Based on original fieldwork in seven African countries, including Botswana, Kenya, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda, Chi Adanna Mgbako draws on extensive interviews with over 160 African female and male (cisgender and transgender) sex worker activists, and weaves their voices and experiences into a fascinating, richly-detailed, and powerful examination of the history and continuing activism of this young movement.
About the author:
picture of Chi Mgbako
Chi Mgbako. Source: https://www.fordham.edu/info/23164/chi_adanna_mgbako

Chi Adanna Mgbako is clinical professor of law and director of the Walter Leitner International Human Rights Clinic at Fordham Law School. In partnership with grassroots organizations, she and her students work on human rights projects focusing on sex workers’ rights, women’s rights, criminal justice reform, and access to justice. She has conducted human rights fieldwork in many countries, among them Botswana, Ethiopia, Kenya, Liberia, Mauritius, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Uganda, and the United States.

Under Mgbako’s direction, the clinic has conducted human rights trainings on women and HIV/AIDS, female genital cutting, and LGBT refugee rights; published human rights reports on access to safe abortion and police abuse of marginalized communities; ran mobile legal aid clinics in rural communities; contributed legal research to lawsuits challenging the forced HIV testing of sex workers; submitted claims to the United Nations on behalf of arbitrarily detained prisoners; and consulted organizations on best practices of community-based paralegal programs, among many other projects.

Mgbako’s publications have appeared in the Harvard Human Rights Journal, Yale Journal of International Affairs, Georgetown Journal of International Law, and Human Rights Quarterly, and popular media, including The International New York Times, The Guardian, and The Huffington Post. She is the author of To Live Freely in This World: Sex Worker Activism in Africa (New York University Press, 2016).

In recognition of Mgbako’s clinical teaching, writing, and human rights advocacy, she has been honored as one of the New York Law Journal’s Rising Stars, National Law Journal’s Top 40 Lawyers of Color Under 40, Fordham Law School’s Public Interest Faculty Member of the Year, and the Police Reform Organizing Project’s Citizen of the City Award recipient.

Before joining the Fordham law faculty in 2007, Mgbako served as the Harvard Henigson Human Rights Fellow in the West Africa Project of the International Crisis Group, where she focused on justice sector reform in Liberia and political reform in Nigeria, and as the Crowley Fellow in International Human Rights at Fordham Law School, where she co-produced a documentary on the feminization of HIV/AIDS in Malawi.

Mgbako earned her JD from Harvard Law School, where she received the Gary Bellow Public Service Award, and her BA, magna cum laude, from Columbia University.

Belated, Bhopal 31 years later: Questions for all of us about the lands where we live

December 2 was the 31 year anniversary of the Union Carbide plant leak in Bhopal.  It killed 20 000 and injured many more.

“Do cities have a mechanism of passing on their history to newcomers or children growing within their borders? Or do all cities ask you to make do with a jigsaw puzzle of footprints and unreliable memories for their children to solve? Does it always take an effort to find out the stories of what had once happened on the land where they were born? Is it important to know the soil where one is born at all? In our world of rootless, migrant workers, is our memory and identity still really linked to our hometowns? ”

 

Continue reading Belated, Bhopal 31 years later: Questions for all of us about the lands where we live

Recently Published: “Nonpracticing Female Lawyers: Why Did They Leave and Where Are They Now?”

Check out this recently published paper, co-authored by Ellen Schlesinger, the current Student Success and Wellness Counsellor at Osgoode:

Ellen V Schlesinger & Lee Butterfield, “Nonpracticing Female Lawyers: Why Did They Leave and Where Are They Now?” (2015) 14:2  The Canadian Journal of Career Development/Revue canadienne de développement de carrière 47.

pic of EllenFrom the abstract:

Since a greater proportion of female lawyers leave the law profession, the present study investigated women lawyers’ decisions to transition from the practice, their feelings at the time they decided to leave, and the characteristics of their current careers. Thematic Analysis of the interviews with nine female participants highlighted the nature of legal work and family responsibilities as the main reasons participants left the legal profession. Most participants reported experiencing anxiety, depression or burnout at the point they decided to change careers. Participants described their transition into new careers, the characteristics of their new work, and reflected on their decision to leave. Implications for career counsellors are considered.

The full article is freely available online on the Canadian Journal of Career Development website.

Ellen worked as a lawyer and legal research consultant for 8 years prior to becoming a counsellor. She specializes in working with professionals, lawyers and law students. As a counsellor, she has worked at Vancouver’s Downtown Community Court, Sheway, and the Adler centre.  See her website here for more information about her impressive work experience and current practice.