Category Archives: What we’ve Done

February 3 1230-2, Jula Hughes: Politics is Women’s Work: A gender lens on the duty to consult

IFLS talk "Politics is Women’s Work - A Gender Lens on the Duty to Consult" Dr. Jula Hughes  Date: 3-Feb-2017 Time: 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM Location: 2027 Osgoode Hall Law School  Dr. Jula Hughes researches in the areas of criminal law, Indigenous governance & Aboriginal law, and judicial ethics. She was the lead researcher on a multidisciplinary, community-driven research project on the duty to consult with urban Aboriginal organizations in Atlantic Canada conducted by the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network.  Her current work considers the duty to consult through a gender lens.  The research explores Indigenous women's governance and living experiences in Eastern Canadian urban settings.  Kindly RSVP www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp
IFLS talk “Politics is Women’s Work – A Gender Lens on the Duty to Consult” Dr. Jula Hughes (UNB Law)

3-Feb-2017     12:30 PM – 02:00 PM
2027 Osgoode Hall Law School
Ignat Kaneff Building (IKB Bldg #32 here)

Public transit directions to York University)

Kindly RSVP, as lunch will be served:  www.osgoode.yorku.ca/research/rsvp

Abstract:  In Atlantic Canada, Indigenous women participate in the political and organizational leadership of off-reserve and non-Status organizations like Native Councils and Friendship Centres to a much higher degree than Canadian women participate in political leadership at any level. In a series of interviews and through research projects in collaboration with Indigenous women leaders, I have asked how these women leaders came to their political work and explored their political practice. In this presentation I report on findings from this research. What emerges is an understanding of the role of women in Wabanaki society that is anchored in a traditional division of labour that emphasized community leadership as women’s work. Indigenous women leaders also understand their work as an important response to the historical experience of gender discrimination under the Indian Act. They note that governments perpetuate its gender discriminatory effects by failing to engage with and consult off-reserve and non-Status populations and advocate for a development of the constitutional duty to consult that promotes gender equality.

Dr. Jula Hughes researches in the areas of criminal law, Indigenous governance & Aboriginal law, and judicial ethics. Find some of her work here, on SSRN. She was the lead researcher on a multidisciplinary, community-driven research project on the duty to consult with urban Aboriginal organizations in Atlantic Canada conducted by the Urban Aboriginal Knowledge Network. Her current work considers the duty to consult through a gender lens. The research explores Indigenous women’s governance and living experiences in Eastern Canadian urban settings.

 

 

 

January 8 at Osgoode: Emma Cunliffe on “Gendered Violence: R v. Barton & the death of Cindy Gladue

Emma Cunliffe (UBC Law) at the IFLS January 8 2016,  1230-2

RSVP at bit.ly/osresearch, use event code Emma (or click through the image below and use event code Emma)

IFLS talk: Emma Cunliffe "Gendered Violence: R. v. Barton and the Death of Cindy Gladue"

Gendered Violence:

R. v Barton & the Death of Cindy Gladue

 

In March 2015, Bradley Barton was acquitted of murder in relation to the death of Cindy Gladue.  Gladue was a Métis mother who bled to death in the bathroom of an Edmonton hotel, allegedly while Barton slept. Barton testified that her wounds had been caused by consensual ‘rough sex’. The forensic pathologist called by the Crown at Barton’s murder trial invited the jury to inspect Gladue’s preserved body tissue in order to reach their own conclusions about how her injuries were caused. (R v Barton, 2015 ABQB 159.) When the acquittal was reported, Indigenous communities, women’s advocates and others responded with anger and dismay. The trial judge’s decision to allow the pathologist to introduce Gladue’s body tissue became a particular focus of disapprobation (eg Sampert, 2015; Cormier, 2015).

This talk will investigate whether expert evidence and legal conceptions of expertise function as Trojan Horses by which discriminatory stereotypes and implicit bias find purchase within Canadian legal processes regarding gendered violence. In particular, Dr. Cunliffe will consider whether the failure of legal processes to respond adequately to gendered violence is partly produced by legal conventions and expert opinions that undermine Charter commitments to fair and egalitarian fact determination.

 

Emma Cunliffe is an associate professor at UBC’s Allard School of Law. Her research analyses the fact determination functions of courts, and particularly addresses expert scientific and medical evidence, the role of implicit stereotypes and bias in the criminal justice system, and the principles of open justice. Emma has received the Killam Prize for Teaching Excellence and the George Curtis Memorial Award for Teaching. At UBC, she teaches evidence, criminal law, jurisprudence and interdisciplinary research methodologies.  Emma’s last visit to York was for the SLST series in 2014, when she talked Women and Wrongful Convictions. 

Reclaiming our Narratives: Conversations on Gender and Racial Profiling in Toronto

GRP - PosterThis event has been fully booked for a while.  It’s tomorrow at Osgoode, organized by a dynamic group of women and a great collection of organizations (see below for a complete list).  IFLS is pleased to be a sponsor of this event and once the post-event report is finished, we’ll hope to have it available on this blog.

You can find a full description of the event below – or click here for a program in pdf.

Reclaiming Our Narratives: Conversations on Gender and Racial Profiling in Toronto 

Saturday, November 28, 2015, 9:30AM to 6:30PM

We all seem to be talking about racial profiling – from lawyers to police officers; from the media to politicians; from people who are profiled every day to those who have never been subject to the experience. But what aren’t we talking about when we talk about racial profiling?
Join us on November 28, 2015, as we discuss the many ways gender impacts racial profiling. We will highlight the often silenced stories of women, girls and trans people, and their experiences with racial profiling — whether at the border or in jails, whether it’s the direct experience of being profiled or the indirect experience of parents and supporters of those who are profiled.

10:00am: Keynote 11:00am: Police brutality and incarceration 12:00pm: Border policing 1:00pm: Lunch & free clothing bank provided by Windfall Clothing 2:00pm: Racial profiling and reproductive justice 3:00pm: Youth experiences 4:00pm: Closing plenary: remedies and resistance
Accessibility:
We know these conversations can be traumatizing for people who are forced to live with the experience of being profiled. We will strive to create a safe and accessible space for speakers, facilitators, and attendees by providing the following services throughout the conference:
active listeners and/or counsellors; ASL language interpretation; child-minding;  Halal food options; gender-neutral washrooms;  room accessibility for mobility devices and tokens for transportation support.
A final report detailing the conference will be produced and distributed. We will also explore other ways to share the event’s key insights.
Organizing Partners:
This event is the collective effort of a number of people and organizations, including
Across Boundaries (rep: Idil Abdillahi); Andrea Anderson, PhD Candidate, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University; Anti-Black Racism Network (rep: Idil Abdillahi); Canadian Association of Muslim Women in Law (rep: Fathima Cader); Harmony Movement (rep: Brittany Andrew-Amofah); METRAC (rep: Jessica Mustachi); Network to Eliminate Police Violence (rep: Kimalee Phillip)

 

August 27 Toronto Book launch for Dayna Scott (ed) Our Chemical Selves

Co sponsored by Osgoode Hall Law School, IFLS, the Politics of Evidence Working Ground and National Network on Environments and Women’s Health

An evening event to share research findings on the environment and reproductive health, and to launch the new book,

Our Chemical Selves: Gender, Toxics and Environmental Health

edited by Dayna Nadine Scott.

A range of speakers include members of the Politics of Evidence Working Group

Thursday August 27 2015        630-830 PM

1214 Queen Street West The Gladstone Hotel  (Gladstone Gallery, 2nd Floor)

This event is made possible by a grant from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research

PLEASE RSVP AT THIS LINK  using event code DNSevent poster. All information in text of post.

 

 

 

Visiting the IFLS: Ruth Fletcher, Queen Mary University London

Photograph of Dr. Ruth FletcherWe’re very pleased to have a short visit (return!) from Dr. Ruth Fletcher this summer.  Her work is focused on medical law and while she is here, she’s working on a host of different things, at the moment.  Here is a small slice:

A Feminist Legal Studies symposium next summer on feminism, legality and knowledge.  Save the date! (June 30-July1 2016).  Dr Fletcher is the lead editor at FLS, here’s a recent Editorial on the submission process:  http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10691-015-9283-7 ,

She is also a part of the  REvaluing Care network http://revaluingcare.net (you can find her comments at http://revaluingcare.net/making-law-liveable-bringing-feminist-knowledge-of-care-into-the-curriculum/ and http://revaluingcare.net/peripheral-thinking-and-abortion-care/).  There is an edited collection forthcoming with Routledge Social Justice Series in 2016, including her chapter ‘Strangeness in Transnational Spaces’

Her interest in abortion law is also evident throughout her work, see for instance this human rights compliant legislation for Ireland drafted by feminist academic lawyers: http://journals.kent.ac.uk/index.php/feministsatlaw/issue/view/16 and http://humanrights.ie/gender-sexuality-and-the-law/an-ihrl-compliant-post-8th-amendment-abortion-law-for-ireland-repealthe8th/
Her faculty page at QMUL is here, and includes information about her research, teaching and publications.
Osgoode folks interested in connecting with Dr. Fletcher during her visit (to end of August) should get in touch with the IFLS co directors.