Category Archives: Co-hosted events

Upcoming Events: The OFC Edition

As usual, the Osgoode Feminist Collective is up to awesome things. Here are two events not to miss next week!

In honour of Diversity Week, BLSA and OFC Present “Ackee & Saltfish” and “Strolling”: Film Screening and Discussion
Tuesday, February 23, 2016 at 12:30 P.M. in the Moot Court

‘Ackee & Saltfish’ is a short film, directed and written by Cecile Emeke, starring Michelle Tiwo as Olivia, and Vanessa Babirye as Rachel.  The film is described as “connecting the scattered stories of the black diaspora”, and looks at gentrification in London through the conversations of two best friends.

‘Strolling’ is a short documentary film series also created by Cecile Emeke, where we take a stroll with people in various cities and countries around the world, having refreshingly raw and honest conversations about various issues at the forefront of their society. The film touches on everything from feminism, sexuality, gender, race and politics to philosophy, art, history, capitalism, war and poverty… and everything else you can think of.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/186650391698161/

 

OUTLaws and OFC present, My Transformation: A Conversation with Rachel Lauren Clark (poster attached)
Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 1:00 P.M., location TBD

event poster for talk by Rachel Lauren ClarkJoin OUTLaws and Osgoode’s Feminist Collective for a conversation with the inspiring trans rights activist Rachel Lauren Clark. Rachel grew up in upstate New York, and was part of the marine corps for eight years. Leaving the military at the age of 25, Rachel eventually moved to Toronto in 2003, where she was working in information technology. In 2013, Rachel started living openly as a trans woman. She is now heavily involved in the LGBTQ community, serving on the board of Pride Toronto.

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/987552994613518/

 

Film Screening Feb 11 @ Osgoode: “Whitewash” by Nadine Valcin

On February 11, the IFLS and the Black Law Students Association (BLSA) are joining forces to screen a short film by Osgoode artist in residence Nadine Valcin. Details below.

event poster - text included in post

“Whitewash”
A Film Screening by Nadine Valcin
Thursday, February 11, 2:30-4pm 
Osgoode ADR (Rm 1014)

A 5-minute video installation that examines slavery in Canada and its omission from the national narrative. The country prides itself as being a benevolent refuge where enslaved Africans who were brought to United States gained their freedom via the Underground Railroad. That powerful image overshadows the fact that slavery was legal in Canada for over 200 years under both French and British rule. Whitewash brings to light some of the slave families that were brought to what is now the province of Prince Edward Island by Loyalists and looks at how nine generations of descendants have assimilated to the point of leaving very few visible traces of their origins. Screening will be followed by a panel discussion.

Nadine Valcin is an award-winning bilingual producer, writer and director. Her factual and documentary work has been shown in Canada on CBC, CBC News Network, TVO, W, Artv, Réseau de l’information (RDI), Société Radio-Canada (SRC), TFO, as well TV One and the History Network in the United States. Valcin has been awarded numerous grants and prizes including the prestigious Chalmers Arts Fellowship and a Drama Prize from the National Screen Institute for the short film In Between.

 

Suzanne Bouclin @ Osgoode Feb 10: “Reforming Prisons, Reforming Women: Ann Vickers and Abortion Law”

event poster

On February 10, the IFLS and Law Arts Culture will be co-hosting the following talk by University of Ottawa Professor Suzanne Bouclin:

Reforming Prisons, Reforming Women: Ann Vickers and Abortion Law
Talk by Suzanne Bouclin of the University of Ottawa 
Wednesday February 10, 2016 
12:30-2pm
Rm 2027, Osgoode Hall (Keele campus) 

Please RSVP at bit.ly/osresearch, using the event code BOUCLIN.

Abstract:

Women in Prison (WIP) movies are a relatively obscure and often under-read body of films. The central theme of this talk is that many of these films provoke us to reconsider whether prisons for women should exist at all. I have argued elsewhere that WIP movies are a site of women’s legal subjectivity and agency and I am currently refining a theory of WIP movies’ generic conventions to further that assertion. The aim of my work is not to establish whether WIP films reveal anything about the actual conditions of incarcerated women. These films vary in their cultural verisimilitude. And while a particular film may hold considerable truth-value, it is often more fictionalized and mediated version of the prison experience that hold the most critical potential.  Thus I suggest an iconological standpoint in relation to WIP movies that takes seriously their potential to leave us feeling unsettled about prisons, about the women who are warehoused in them, and about the crimes with which these women have been accused.  I have generated a (non-linear and non-essentialist) taxonomy of WIP films that emerge during three moments in feminist theorizing and activism that can be loosely arranged as the first, second, and third waves. I conclude that this body of films – this genre – is a shifting and complex feminist jurisprudence. Individual films in inter-textual relationship with a broader body of films present women who negotiate formal and informal legal structures that frame and limit their autonomy and agency. Nevertheless, they also present women who refuse to accept ‘law’ that is externally imposed upon them or the legitimacy of the legal actors that enforce it – whether wardens, child and welfare services, medical practitioners. I examine the dialogical relationship between these representations of women in prison and the manner in which formalized legal institutions and official legal agents label particular women ‘criminals.’ Without a doubt, some WIP movies reproduce the gendered operations and assumptions of criminal law; yet, some do so while also challenging its institutions and apparatuses of power. Moreover, some exemplary WIPs (I highlight one in this talk) offer ways to imagine the violence of state/legal practices and the inhumanity of total institutions to suggest broader gender, race, and class injustices that render particular women more vulnerable to criminalization and incarceration.

The centerpiece of my discussion is the film Ann Vickers. Drawing on the critical methodology of law-and-literature and law-and-film studies, I will engage in a literary and legal analysis of the novel and the film Ann Vickers (1930) and especially how WIP movies’ generic law gets mapped on to the canonical (written) law. I focus on two modes and sites of law: the formal prohibition of abortion and the informal regulation of film’s content under the Production Code during a period of lax regulation. I will explore substantive legal questions around women’s suffrage and access to safe abortion. I will also grapple with jurisprudential questions around the nature of authority, inter-textual dialogue and precedent that emerge when engaging in inter-textual dialogue (here of a novel and its cinematic representation).

Suzanne Bouclin is an Associate Professor at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law (Programme de Common Law en Français). She writes and researches on law and poverty, feminist jurisprudence, law and popular culture, and the regulation of women’s bodies. She recently launched a new iteration of the Ticket Defence Program (TDP)a free mobile legal clinic that offers representation to the homeless and street-involved people who experience social profiling at the hands of police and by-law officers. Dr. Bouclin is also a recent recipient of the Ontario Early Researcher Award for a five-year project which explores the potential for furthering access to justice through new communications technologies.

Save the date, and some travel $: Feminist Legal Studies Seminar at QMUL summer 2016: Mixing Feminism, Legality and Knowledge

Source: The FLaK seminar: Mixing Feminism, Legality and Knowledge

 

End of June in London, UK.  Definitely hoping to be there and conserving my institutional funds for the purpose.  Anyone else? More information coming soon from the organizers (who include recent IFLS visitor, Feminist Legal Studies Editor-in-Chief and QMUL Professor Ruth Fletcher.

In addition, the Osgoode IFLS is hoping to start preliminary discussions with FLS and other interested organizations in Canada about a follow up meeting in Toronto summer 2017…

Here’s the current blurb for the London Seminar- a schedule and more detailed description is currently in draft.

Feminist Legal Studies will hold a special seminar at Queen Mary University of London to consider anew the relationship between feminism, legality and knowledge. In anticipation of FLS’s 25th birthday in 2017, we would like to think with others about the kind of ‘kitchen table’ that FLS might provide into the future. How might feminist legal studies – the approach and the journal – best use its food, equipment, techniques, time, space, mood, energy and commitment?

How shall FLS scholars and associates make the most of what we have in a room that can sometimes be confining and confusing, yet also exciting and sustaining? How do others engage with the processes and products of our kitchen table?

In considering such questions and more, we propose to draw reflexively on feminist legacies of praxis, internationalism and openness, as we ‘stock-up’ and critically reflect on know-how, protest and publishing practices.

 

A storify re: Reclaiming our Narratives: Racial and Gender Profiling in Toronto

Storify just collects tweets, so you can use it to tell a story about an event or issue.  Here’s one I put together after attending this event, (you can see the event announcement here).
It was great. Congratulations to the organizers on a really well put together public event.  I met some really great women, learned a lot, had feelings and thoughts at the same time (!), wallowed in being one of the oldest people in the room.  Sometimes folks ask me, what’s up with the younger feminists, what are they reading, what are they doing, what are they thinking?  Here’s one piece of the answer.  Been to any really great events related to feminism and law lately? Want to post about them, even after the fact? About the experience of being there? Let me know.

-sonia